Jump to content
Hornius Emeritus

Traces of Texas' new Collaboration with Texas Highways Magazine

Recommended Posts

For some deranged reason, Texas Highways magazine has decided to give me ---- Traces of Texas ---- a monthly Texas history column. I'm crazy excited to do it as I've always loved the magazine. In honor of this auspicious event, they're giving my readers a deeply discounted subscription offer and I thought I'd pass it on to y'all, too: $17.50 for one year and $29.50 for two years. You have to use this link. The offer expires Nov. 3:

https://ssl.drgnetwork.com/ecom/THM/app/live/subscriptions?org=THM&publ=TH&key_code=JXTOTX&type=S&gift_key=J5FXGFT&fbclid=IwAR1hYa8SNahPZ5tk9nB1booXjZku5nrwBogh62UM53G3zcxZk7UHodDuXRE
 

As you can imagine, I'm beyond happy to be collaborating with Texas Highways, being that I've been a reader for 45 years. I'll be getting the inside back cover of each issue. The first issue with my Vintage article is the November issue and it was just published. I posted the photo/article below. As you can see, this is a photo that reader Cecilia Thompson sent in to me. I was very, very happy that she shared it and allowed Texas HIghways to publish it because it's so utterly classic in every way. These kids in Dallas have a true "Dennis the Menace" quality and you just KNOW there's a slingshot in the back pocket of at least one of them. Those cane poles, the cans of worms ... too much.

Anyway, for a year's worth of great information about what to do in Texas, where to go, all kinds of great info etc...  it seems like a pretty good deal to me. I'm thrilled to be able to collaborate with the great folks at TxDot  who put out the magazine.

Also, if you have a great Texas history photo and you'd like to see it published, please send it to me at this email address: tracesoftxphotos@gmail.com   Please include as much relevant information as you can think of.


73141113_2762700840428694_20662193878361
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great news! Very happy for you and proud to be Surly with you. I'll be subscribing. We had a subscription to the magazine all thru my childhood and it was the source material for many family weekend getaways and always had great photographs. It's still one of my favorites to pick up when I'm at the barber shop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, DoobieWah said:

Can we assume that each of your missives will end with a rousing

OU SUX

?

 



Tried to sneak that by the editors but they caught it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dude that’s fantastic. I was just telling my wife yesterday how awesome your Facebook feed is. I read about the oven temperature control post yesterday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats!

One of my images was on the cover of the October edition of Texas Highways (Fall colors) - Images from Texas.

Keep up the good work.

Grasshopper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, BottleRocket said:

My favorite picture to date.
067c48d2587b4efa028693f6472d4d70.jpg

 

Ha! I had totally forgotten that one. When I first saw it I thought of Dieter on Sprockets:  "Would you like to pet my monkey?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats!  I follow you on Facebook and have made all my friends and family do the same. 
 

Actually You are pretty much the only reason I still log onto Facebook. 
 

I’ll Try to remember to send you some old Galveston grade raising pictures I have 

Edited by Xian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/29/2019 at 9:28 PM, BottleRocket said:

My favorite picture to date.
067c48d2587b4efa028693f6472d4d70.jpg

Best is the UT sorority girls from the 40s.  Don’t have it handy.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy Cow so it's you.  I absolutely love your posts on Facebook and missed them while you were MIA over the summer.   I've always been a Texas history fan and love traveling the state.  Now with my kids save one leaving the house and a possible move to the Hill Country soon, I'm looking forward to doing a lot of in state travel.   Keep up the good work and a new subscription is on the way.  Used to read that magazine all the time as a kid wherever their was a waiting area and still do when I get a chance and I'm off my darn phone.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/31/2019 at 7:13 AM, Nueces River Rat said:

Holy Cow so it's you.  I absolutely love your posts on Facebook and missed them while you were MIA over the summer.   I've always been a Texas history fan and love traveling the state.  Now with my kids save one leaving the house and a possible move to the Hill Country soon, I'm looking forward to doing a lot of in state travel.   Keep up the good work and a new subscription is on the way.  Used to read that magazine all the time as a kid wherever their was a waiting area and still do when I get a chance and I'm off my darn phone.  


Thanks, Rat.  The current issue has an OUTSTANDING article about Caddo Lake  by S.C. Gwynne, who wrote "Empire of the Summer Moon"  about Comanche chief Quanah Parker. . The photos are haunting, too:

https://texashighways.com/things-to-do/on-the-water/lakes/against-all-odds-caddo-lake-prevails/

 

As I say, I'm pretty proud of what the magazine has become. It's way better than it was 10-15 years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Image may contain: mountain, sky, outdoor, water and nature

I can't get over how awesome this image is. The Battleship Texas passes through the Panama Canal in 1929. STUNNING! It's amazing to think that so many Texans have been on the very decks that those sailors are standing on!

 

Seriously, if y'all aren't following Traces of Texas, you need to rectify that immediately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, HornOnTheBayou said:

Image may contain: mountain, sky, outdoor, water and nature

I can't get over how awesome this image is. The Battleship Texas passes through the Panama Canal in 1929. STUNNING! It's amazing to think that so many Texans have been on the very decks that those sailors are standing on!

 

Seriously, if y'all aren't following Traces of Texas, you need to rectify that immediately.

22228474_10214485956292354_6223900841745

 

Onboard the Texas for a Scouting overnighter.  Glad we got to do the "Live Aboard" before all the upcoming headaches with moving her for the [much needed] repairs.

 

22308948_10214485987773141_3937360091891

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Space Balls reenactment?  LOlz.

 

LOVE Traces of Texas and regret just now seeing this thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

man this is such great news.  I love, love, love your instagram feed.  I like and comment regularly.  so glad you get a reoccurring feature in such an amazing mag.  I'll subscribe absolutely!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Legitimately loled at the TOT Facebook entry today.  It was a Christmas miracle.

Quote

I feel a little guilty laughing at The Texas Quote of the Day, which needs a little historical background. Once upon a time, meaning the mid-1950s, Jules Loh, who would go on to become a national prize-winning writer in New York for the Associated Press, labored as a young reporter for the Waco News-Tribune. He was sent to report on a Nativity pageant being staged in the rural community of Blooming Grove, Texas. This is the pageant story as seen through his eyes. The News-Tribune declined to publish this:

"BLOOMING GROVE, Texas

They held the Nativity pageant here Monday night, and if it had happened in Bethlehem like it happened in Blooming Grove, Christmas would be a day sooner - or maybe not at all. For a year the good people of Blooming Grove, Barry and Emhouse, Texas, had prepared for the pageant. They practiced religiously, as it were, and sacrificed nothing to realism. The women made the costumes; the men gathered their sheep. Somebody even found myrrh. The Blooming Grove preacher, a former tent show operator called Brother Bill, arranged the setting.

The manger was in an old barn. A milk cow and an old ram were tied to the manger. At the left was the inn, and at the right were the fields where shepherds, costumed and holding long crooks, were watching over their sheep by night. Brother Bill had put spotlights on both sides, which were to follow the characters as they entered. Miss Alva Taylor was the reader. As she read the Christmas story from the Bible the characters would enact the passage. However, some things got enacted that weren't exactly Biblical.

The choir began to sing, the reader began to read, and the pageant was on. Out of a pasture behind the barn came Mary and Joseph on their way to enroll; Mary riding a donkey, Joseph walking beside. The donkey was balky. He kept stopping, and Joseph kept yanking at the halter. Finally, right before they got to the inn, the donkey had enough. With a grand bray, he rared back and pitched Mary right on her bundle of swaddling clothes. She lit with both legs up in the air. The audience gasped. Some of the women thought she was actually pregnant. The donkey went down on his side. Joseph thought the donkey was hurt. The donkey wouldn't get up. While Mary picked herself up, Joseph inspected the donkey's legs. He finally decided it was a too tight saddle girth that caused him to pitch. There was Mary brushing straw off her clothes, and Joseph loosening the saddle girth, and Brother Bill hollering, "For Lord's sake, get those spotlights off'em! Shine 'em on the inn!" Mary was fixing to mount up again for another try, but the saddle was too loose so she and Joseph decided to walk the rest of the way to Bethlehem.

Joseph stopped at the inn and just as he was about to knock, the door opened with the innkeeper shaking his head. Mary had forgotten about the inn and was already kneeling at the manger. The ruckus didn't phase Miss Alva a bit. She kept fight on reading and managed to stay about four verses ahead of the rest of the pageant. Then it came to pass for the angels to appear to the shepherds.

At about the same time the spotlights shifted to the fields and the choir began with "Angels We Have Heard on High," the sheep spied that ram tied to the manger. The sheep started for the ram. The angel popped up from behind some cedar boughs and said, "Fear not!" but the shepherds were sore afraid. They were running this way and that, swatting the sheep with their crooks, trying to keep the whole flock from charging the manger. A few got away - about six. They crowded into the barn next to the ram, and began eating the straw out of the manger. Happy now, the old ram went "Baa, baa" the rest of the night, and it was somewhat disconcerting to Miss Alva. She would look over at that ram disgustedly, lose her place, find it and continue.

Out of the east came the wise men, slowly, following the star. They deposited their gifts before the manger - all except one of them who had a vase and couldn't get it to stand up on the straw. Finally he got it balanced, stepped back. The old ram stepped up and kicked it over. The wise man shrugged and let it lay. Now all were in the barn - Mary, Joseph, shepherds, wise men, sheep and cow - for all to watch and meditate while the choir sang. But there was more excitement. In the middle of "Adeste Fideles," the loudspeaker went to shrieking. And during the deathly pause while it was being fixed, the old milk cow raised her tail and let loose fight where somebody was sure to step in it. Then the Blooming Grove Nativity Pageant was over. "Amen," said Brother Bill, and the audience answered, "Amen."

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...