Jump to content
Goo Punch

Greg Brown III - Supposed to announce on April 24

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, orangecat92 said:

Previous couple of generations, but I believe LaSalle Thompson was the highest rated recruit to come to Texas before the Barnes' years.  I sort of kind of remember that Thompson was a High School All-American.  That man could rebound better than the remainder of the Texas big men in the last 30 years or so.  He led the country in rebounding. 13. something rebounds per game.  

Maybe so but Derka’s opinion (well, fact) is that Greg is the highest rated Austin player ever. LaSalle was from Cincy. 

Not sure about who was a bigger recruit, because I was born the year LaSalle committed, but I doubt we will ever garner a bigger recruit than KD. I still remember being at a dinner one night about 12 years ago with a bunch of wealthy guys. Avery Johnson was coaching the Mavs at the time, in their prime, and he was still the toast of the town. Some of the guys were so close with a minority owner of the Mavs that they’d traveled on the team plane for away games and so we ordered AJ a bottle of wine and he joined us. I asked him, “Coach, if you had the first pick, you take Oden or KD?”  He responds, “Now you gotta go with Oden.  I love KD’s game but you gotta go with the big man.”  I love Avery, and that was conventional wisdom at the time of pretty much every GM. But it was retarded. KD is arguably will be the best player and/or most prolific scorer of his generation, and a career 20 ppg was a known pre-draft. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Having recently been able to rewatch those games KD played against Tech and A&M only makes it 10x more absurd in my mind than it already was a week ago. I was watching him in total awe. He was an NBA All Star playing against college kids, and he was the youngest guy on the court. He was literally a 6'11" guard who could shoot from 25 feet, could dunk on anyone, could handle and drive as well as our All American PG, and oh yeah he averaged 12 boards, 2 blocks, and 2 steals per game. But, you know, gotta go with big man, right? 🙄 

A couple of questions for all of the great NBA minds of 2007:

When's the last time a guy was irrefutably they best college player by a hundred miles and all the NBA GM's were like, "nah, i'll pass for this other guy"?

When's the last time a guy in the NBA didn't pan out because he wasn't strong enough? "Yeah, shame about Brandon. Shoots like Bird, passes like Magic, jumps like Michael, and he's seven feet tall; if only he could lift heavier weights."

Edited by Goo Punch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

He might come to Texas. We are the favorite for a reason. Based on following his recruitment as well as his dad's comments, if they don't choose to go to the highest bidder then I really believe he chooses Texas. He's going to college for exactly one year, and his family isn't hurting for money. Shaka started recruiting him when he was in 8th grade and has a great relationship with the entire family, all of whom would like to be able to watch Greg play in person without having to travel to Lexington or Memphis. I'll be a little surprised if he doesn't choose Texas. 

Edited by Goo Punch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Goo Punch said:

Having recently been able to rewatch those games KD played against Tech and A&M only makes it 10x more absurd in my mind than it already was a week ago. I was watching him in total awe. He was an NBA All Star playing against college kids, and he was the youngest guy on the court. He was literally a 6'11" guard who could shoot from 25 feet, could dunk on anyone, could handle and drive as well as our All American PG, and oh yeah he averaged 12 boards, 2 blocks, and 2 steals per game. But, you know, gotta go with big man, right? 🙄 

A couple of questions for all of the great NBA minds of 2007:

When's the last time a guy was irrefutably they best college player by a hundred miles and all the NBA GM's were like, "nah, i'll pass for this other guy"?

When's the last time a guy in the NBA didn't pan out because he wasn't strong enough? "Yeah, shame about Brandon. Shoots like Bird, passes like Magic, jumps like Michael, and he's seven feet tall; if only he could lift heavier weights."

Boggles the mind. That was 1980s/early 1990s wisdom that was easily disproven since Shaq (game has shifted away from the big man; AD now is just as important on the perimeter).  I was kinda stunned then hearing from an NBA mindset, with the Mavs no less, and they were nowhere near a lottery pick. It was just common NBA thought. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Goo Punch said:

Axtell would have been a killer in today's game. he was perfectly suited for the modern style of basketball. just born too early i guess. 

I agree, maybe a poor man's Kevin Durant. He had all the skills, though where Durant was a 10/10 Axtell was a 7/10. But used properly, he could have been a hugely disruptive matchup. 

He also might not have had the mental fortitude that Durant has. His flameout might have been inevitable whether he picked UT or not.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, SwanderedTalent said:

I agree, maybe a poor man's Kevin Durant. He had all the skills, though where Durant was a 10/10 Axtell was a 7/10. But used properly, he could have been a hugely disruptive matchup. 

He also might not have had the mental fortitude that Durant has. His flameout might have been inevitable whether he picked UT or not.  

 

Came across this article on Axtell... He's been helping veterans and was living in Dripping Springs, Tx.

https://www.kansas.com/sports/outdoors/article151286287.html 

"Former KU basketball player Luke Axtell helps bring the outdoors to service heroes"

Axtell, 38, is national director of hunting and fishing for Heroes Sports, a nonprofit organization that connects returning U.S. military service members with sports, the outdoors and an active lifestyle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Dr. Beeper said:

So I played high school ball with Axtell and Mihm. My summer league team consisted of Chico and a bunch of brothers. I was the one white kid on the team. Chico is a great dude. I played in games against Clack, Marty Hardy and Stringfellow. Clack and Axtell were far and away the best players I ever played with. It wasn’t close. Chico had more athleticism than Axtell, but not much. His game in HS was truly KD-esque. Before you think that comparison is ridiculous, consider the HS level competition of CenTex basketball. His game was more athletic than people realized and he was our 2-guard. 

In terms of raw athleticism combined with skill, I’ve never seen someone like Clack. We feared him; all of Austin did. He was that good. 

Marty was a terrific baseball player as a youth too, not sure when he switched to basketball full time. Roger Roesler played at Balcones back then as well, those two guys looked like grown men at age 12. Our 11-12 all-star team came close to making it out of Waco. That’s my csb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Goo Punch said:

He might come to Texas. We are the favorite for a reason. Based on following his recruitment as well as his dad's comments, if they don't choose to go to the highest bidder then I really believe he chooses Texas. He's going to college for exactly one year, and his family isn't hurting for money. Shaka started recruiting him when he was in 8th grade and has a great relationship with the entire family, all of whom would like to be able to watch Greg play in person without having to travel to Lexington or Memphis. I'll be a little surprised if he doesn't choose Texas. 

Highest bidder shouldn’t really be a big deal for a lottery pick a year later who can get money under the table from an agent after a handshake deal. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Goo Punch said:

Brown is far and away the best player to ever come out of the Austin area. Athletically he's like a 6'8" Kerwin Roach, but he actually has real basketball skill. Handle, passing, shooting, driving- he can do it all on offense. Our team next year will probably have five guys averaging double digits (or close to it), so he may not light up the world like KD, but he has a very well-rounded offensive game and should be an impact player from day one, assuming we change our offense and he's not just standing around the 3-point line like a ball rack. His one year in college should be full of highlight reel plays; just wish he got some real coaching/winning to go along with it. 

Which absolutely means he will stand around the 3 point line waiting for the ball with under 5 seconds on the shot clock. The typical Shaka offense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Project starting five with key rotation players.  A stab:

PG - Coleman

G - AJ

G - Ramey

G/F - Brown

C - Sims

Bench: Williams, Cunningham, Febres, Baker, Hamm, KJ, Hepa

With the way Cunningham and Hamm flashed down the stretch, and Williams to some extent, all others better step up their game. Baker, KJ and Hepa need to develop and fast or they’re gonna be outside a tighter rotation. Febres had better be used sparingly and get increased minutes when hot. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Dr. Beeper said:

Project starting five with key rotation players.  A stab:

PG - Coleman

G - AJ

G - Ramey

G/F - Brown

C - Sims

Bench: Williams, Cunningham, Febres, Baker, Hamm, KJ, Hepa

With the way Cunningham and Hamm flashed down the stretch, and Williams to some extent, all others better step up their game. Baker, KJ and Hepa need to develop and fast or they’re gonna be outside a tighter rotation. Febres had better be used sparingly and get increased minutes when hot. 

By the way, with Ramey developing down the stretch and AJ starting to return to form, that’s a salty starting lineup and 12-deep. Can’t wait to see how Shaka fucks it up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of combinations, if we waste Brown as a pick and pop 4......lord help us. I could see minutes at the 3 if he can keep improving his ball handling.

PG: Coleman

SG: Jones

SF: Williams

PF: Brown

Center: Sims

 

A backup 5.....

PG: Ramey

SG: Febres

SF: Liddell, Cunningham

PF: Cunningham, Hepa, Hamm

Center: Kai Jones, Will Baker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Revolution512 said:

Lots of combinations, if we waste Brown as a pick and pop 4......lord help us. I could see minutes at the 3 if he can keep improving his ball handling.

PG: Coleman

SG: Jones

SF: Williams

PF: Brown

Center: Sims

 

A backup 5.....

PG: Ramey

SG: Febres

SF: Liddell, Cunningham

PF: Cunningham, Hepa, Hamm

Center: Kai Jones, Will Baker.

I wanna see Ramey play more and I don’t mind having a three guard lineup.  Coleman is gonna play 30 mpg at point anyway. But would love to see more of Williams. I don’t want Febres playing 20 mpg off the bench. He is a one trick pony and a detriment most of the time. Your lineup of bench players would seem to shortchange Cunningham and Hamm and we cannot have that any more. Shaka can’t afford to let either wither on the bench. Cunningham isn’t a PF, and Hepa and KJ are out of position. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you’re gonna run a 3 guard lineup and not play Febres much that leaves some tough rotations for a coach whose proven he’s absolutely shitty at figuring that out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Revolution512 said:

If you’re gonna run a 3 guard lineup and not play Febres much that leaves some tough rotations for a coach whose proven he’s absolutely shitty at figuring that out. 

Wouldn’t mind starting games like that but in no way would I stay in it all game most games. I wouldn’t mind Williams starting. But Ramey and Brock need to be the first guys off the bench, and then Hamm to spell Sims. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe this is a 5 star player.  If that is correct, if I  was a 5 star parent who could go to any university for one year and have a 90%+ chance of going in the first round of the draft the next year, I would not give a hometown discount to the horns.  I would simply look for the coach that has the best reputation for developing players.  My second consideration would be playing time.  If I look at the top two considerations, Texas wins for playing time, and that's it.  If he is getting NBA lottery money he can pay to fly his parents anywhere in the country his first year in the NBA.  

In short, I think we get Shaka and no GBIII if the parents look at developing players for the next level.  

What is our record next year without GB?  Depending upon the creampuffs in November December, I say about the same as this year.  Then 8 and 10 in conference . 

Other secondary consideration, does GB want to play before a nearly empty Erwin Center in conference games in February?    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if he comes to Texas we're gonna be pretty good next year. as LonghornMatt said earlier, even Shaka can't fuck next year's team to the point where we miss the tourney (assuming GB III is a Horn). We should be a tournament team without him in all honesty. With a good coach we could even be a preseason top 20-25 team. We return everyone from a bubble team and will actually have an experienced, athletic, and deep roster next year. Add GB III and that's a really good looking team, HC notwithstanding. All of this is to say that the FEC will have 12,000+ throughout conference play if GB III joins and we play to something like 70% of our potential. I know that's a big "if", but GB III himself would be a pretty big attraction. We should definitely have better crowds next year. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/28/2020 at 6:44 PM, Dr. Beeper said:

Chico struggled much more than anyone thought with the transition to the college level. In high school, that ‘94-‘95 season, it was he and Clack dominating the Austin HS scene and it was really cool. Stringfellow was a competent big, but those two were really special. Again, I played ball with him all summer and the dude was crazy good. 

College players were more of a challenge for him, but he carved out a nice niche for himself as a starter and role player and defensive guy. 

Chico struggled in college because he enjoyed it waaaay too much.  They didn't call him the mayor of Austin for nothing.  Dude loved to have a good time and gained a lot of bad weight during college years as a result. Still consider him a friend til this day.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Catdaddyhorn said:

Chico struggled in college because he enjoyed it waaaay too much.  They didn't call him the mayor of Austin for nothing.  Dude loved to have a good time and gained a lot of bad weight during college years as a result. Still consider him a friend til this day.  

Yeah, just to clarify-- there was nothing wrong with Chico's college career. He was a good player, had a decent career. He just didn't end up being the kind of difference-maker people hoped he'd be when he signed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well March was like, 8 months long. So we’ll all be dead by the time 4/24 happens 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, SwanderedTalent said:

Yeah, just to clarify-- there was nothing wrong with Chico's college career. He was a good player, had a decent career. He just didn't end up being the kind of difference-maker people hoped he'd be when he signed. 

He saved our asses from being Coppin State’s second upset victim in 1997...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/30/2020 at 8:35 PM, Goo Punch said:

 

Courtney Ramey left the comment "Lob City 👀". Let's hope so. 

Somebody tell Greg that in April, it's not CST, it's CDT.  And we hope the teach him the difference here at the University of Texas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andrew Jones

Greg Brown

Donovan Williams

Royce Hamm

Kai Jones

 

is that the most athletic lineup in all of college basketball? I say yes. we probably wouldn't want to run this particular lineup a ton during conference or anything, but still- if we add GB III then we have one of the most athletic teams in the entire country next year. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yep, that's another ridiculous athlete. take out Williams or Hamm for Sims and you still have probably the most athletic lineup in America.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

The Athletic published a piece on GBIII today. Doesn't really discuss where he's headed, more of a piece illustrating him, his background, and his relationship with is dad. Paywall'd, but posted in my post after this one.

https://theathletic.com/1738044/2020/04/13/greg-brown-could-remain-austins-hometown-hero-but-the-top-recruit-has-options/

Edited by TaxMaster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Greg Brown could remain Austin’s hometown hero, but the top recruit has options

GettyImages-1160853752-1024x683.jpg
By Brian Hamilton 4h agocomment-icon@2x.png 1 save-icon@2x.png

AUSTIN, Texas — Among the first assignments on this particular morning at Vandegrift High School: two-ball dribbling. From sideline to sideline and back, groups of two or three taking turns and filling the gym with rhythmic thuds before the clock on the wall hits 8 o’clock. A series of shooting stations follows without much of a break, soundtracked by Galantis’ “Peanut Butter Jelly” on a speaker. There’s only silence when the bell rings at 8:40. It’s a full stop for the Pledge of Allegiance, the Texas Pledge and brief announcements that end with a thank you and encouragement to have a great day, and go Vipers.

With that, the balls start bouncing again.

Everything is thoroughly and unsuspiciously ordinary, until it’s not. This is the way Greg Brown III decided it should be. He’s sweating through a humdrum high school practice with a bunch of dudes he has played with for years, some of them since middle school. In the era of academies and prep school super-squads, it’s increasingly the last place you’d look for a five-star prospect with a gilded pro future. But he chose this. And in doing so, he chose to accommodate interludes of the not-ordinary, which on this day manifests as Bruce Pearl and his Auburn staff walking in midway through the workout, after calling Vandegrift’s coach around 10 p.m. the night before to say they’d be flying in for a visit.

When Brown arrived here on this unremarkable late February morning, the whole plan was news to him. “It is still crazy,” he says of the attention, sitting at a courtside table while his out-of-town suitors await their audience. “They’ll bring their whole staff, and it’s like, dang, that’s a lot of people in one gym.”

Quite a few people, in fact, are interested in what he chooses next. On April 24, one of the last available gems in the 2020 recruiting cycle — and the No. 19 player in The Athletic 40, our ranking of all prospects across all high school classes — will make his college choice known. The finalists are Auburn, Kentucky, Memphis, Michigan and Texas. Whoever signs Brown III will get a 6-9 forward who’s still growing, in pretty much every sense, and whose multi-tool skill set offers the promise of infusing any lineup with a walking mismatch. A commitment from a McDonald’s All-American might have deeper resonance for each program, sure, particularly the one that operates about 15 miles down the road. But his play, in all reality, is the thing.

And nobody is entirely sure what Brown will do in this sense either, which is the source of the enthrallment. “Every year, he’s gotten twice as good as he was the year before, and I don’t see that stopping,” Vandegrift coach Cliff Ellis says. “I can’t wait to see him when his life is gym, weight room and cafeteria. When that becomes his life, he’ll be hell to deal with.”

How acutely Brown’s past informs his future, whether the sum of his experiences and decisions amounts to a clue or a red herring, only amplifies the intrigue. It’s easy to say he’s not always followed the predictable path, but that also depends on your working definition of predictable.

He came to Austin at the age of 10, moving in with his father, Greg II, after living in the Dallas area with his mother and twin sister. “He started giving her some issues,” Brown II says, and the former defensive back for Texas and the Denver Broncos swiftly moved to occupy his son, whether his son liked it or not. Brown III had not played much basketball to that point, at least not with any conviction. But his height — he was at least a few inches past 5 feet already — dictated the plan. A hoops trajectory became preeminent. Within a year or two, the younger Brown was running hills and stairs too, even in the dead of miserably hot Texas summers, even when he’d concluded that pursuing basketball was not worth running said hills and stairs.

Those complaints that he didn’t want to play anymore were met with a shrug. I have no problem with that, the father would tell his son. But we’re still going to do this work. “To be honest,” Brown III says now, “I didn’t really like basketball when I started.” It wasn’t until he reached seventh grade, in fact, that he began to prod his father to start the day’s training. By then Brown III was even a more-than-willing participant in early morning workouts, driving with his father to the indoor court at The Verandah, an apartment complex where one of his dad’s cousins lived. He drilled everything from his weak hand to wrong-foot finishes to pull-ups starting at 5:45 a.m., before returning home to shower and head to school. “You don’t really know whether you like a sport or not until you get good at it,” Brown Jr. says. “Once Greg started seeing success, it started almost becoming like a drug.”

Foundations aren’t meant to shift much, even as you build upon them, and so it went with an emerging star in the hills outside Austin. Brown III had made friends, naturally, over the first few years with his dad, playing alongside of them on those sixth- and seventh-grade basketball teams. Changing course and, say, enrolling at a high school with a stronger basketball tradition and track record would’ve defeated the purpose on a couple of fronts; one, he wouldn’t be around his guys. And, two, summers were for loading up with similarly gifted players and playing with top talent on the grassroots circuit. The challenge at Vandegrift — finding a way to win without the benefit of Division I talent at every other position — was the entire point.

And it would be a challenge, competing in the largest classification in Texas high school athletics, facing off with teams such as Austin’s Westlake High, which could deploy multiple future Division I players. “He’s still the big fish in a big pond,” Ellis says. Brown III averaged 17.2 points and 10.7 rebounds as a freshman for a Vandegrift team that finished five games below .500. When his senior season ended with a regional quarterfinal playoff loss on March 3, he had led Vandegrift to a 33-3 record while finishing his prep career with 3,007 points and, not long after, earning Gatorade Player of the Year honors in Texas. “I figure if you can (win) with kids that aren’t very talented, what happens when you get with guys who can actually play?” Brown Jr. says. “How special would that be?”

It was actually the dynamic the Browns confronted before his final high school campaign, and it is one that can and will be stripped for meaning until April 24. Greg Brown III could have played almost anywhere else last winter. He could have enrolled at a powerhouse prep school, as so many other top-shelf talents do, for one high-profile tuneup before the one-year stopover on a college campus. He could have avoided one more season of teams ganging up on him and doing anything inside and outside the rules to frustrate and unsettle an otherwise fairly undeniable force: untying his shoelaces at the free-throw line, pulling his hair and his jersey, touching him, uh, everywhere. “When I say everywhere, I mean everywhere,” Brown III says. “It’s weird.”

He was, in his father’s estimation, “almost out the door” to IMG Academy in Florida. But one thought kept tugging at him.

“My teammates, basically,” Brown III says. “They’ve put in so much work for me and I put in so much work for them, we just built a bond. I couldn’t see myself walking away from them. I had to stay here and complete our legacy. This is our last year, and we’re never going to get this back again.”

It doesn’t appear to be an act; inasmuch as anyone can judge from one visit, there seems to be a genuineness to Brown III’s affection for the group and an appreciation of being part of it, albeit a very obviously distinguishable part. He looks at a poster of the Vandegrift seniors hanging on the gym wall and runs through the parts each of them play: Jake Hatch is the dad of the team, he says. Kale Farone is like the little brother. Freddie Southwell and Gabe Rayer are the team goofs, and Brown III can’t decide which is goofier. Jed Willis will “fight anybody at any time,” but he’s also a sort of the Greg Brown Whisperer, pulling Vandegrift’s star aside before every tipoff and reminding him to just do what he does, to stay poised.

They all eat at Pluckers. They all go to each other’s houses and play NBA2K, with Brown III declaring himself the best player and chief smack-talker. They are, if this is to believed, just normal high school dudes who happen to have a potential future lottery pick sitting on the couch. During a ceremony at Vandegrift to commemorate his selection to the McDonald’s All-American Game, Brown III took the microphone and immediately invited his teammates to join him on the floor, and a group hug ensued. “He could walk around here like, I’m better than this, I’m better than y’all,” Ellis says. “It’s nothing like that. This could’ve been a very negative experience. I’ve heard the horror stories about prima donna athletes. He’s not like that at all.”

IMG-7367-1024x768.jpg
 
While other top recruits congregate at the major prep schools, Brown instead chose to stay home and be the focus of attention on and off the court at Vandegrift. (Brian Hamilton / The Athletic)

To believe it was all gumdrops and rainbows for four years is to be more than a bit naive, of course. It’s high school, and it’s youth athletics, so there are bound to be strong and hard feelings on all sides along the way. “I probably would’ve slapped the taste out of a couple teammates’ mouths,” Brown Jr. cracks as he thinks back across his son’s high school years, before noting that any time he raised complaints, Brown III would simply reply: Dad, I got it. I’m not worried about it. Even during this final season, Ellis says there was “a little situation” early on that caused the team to “get testy,” without going into detail. A couple of conversations set the record straight and, voila, a 33-win season followed. “They’re really good kids,” Brown Jr. says. “He really enjoys those guys, he really embraced them, and really embraced the whole thing, man.”

Where all of this takes Greg Brown III is one more choice he has to make, but it should be no surprise what he is prioritizing.

“Relationships is one of the big things with us,” he says.

He benefits from a clear-eyed view of a process that’s coming to an end, thanks to a mother and father who both were college athletes and both experienced the recruitment song-and-dance. (Tonya Wallace, his mother, competed in track and field at Texas.) All of the sweet-talking and promises from coaches is laundered through a reality check, Brown Jr. laughing as he says it’s almost like judging “who lied to us the least.” He has told his son that college coaches want to keep their jobs above all, and they do that by winning, and however they think Greg Brown III will help them achieve that goal is how they’ll use him on the floor, no matter what they’ve said.

Perhaps it’s why the object of everyone’s affection, in this case, doesn’t even bother with proclamations about what he wants, basketball-wise, at the next level. He knows it might not matter as much as he’d like it to. “I can be coached any way,” Brown III says. “I can fit into any system.”

Nor are the family ties to Texas superseding objective appraisals of all five finalists, at least according to the appraisers. “I just told him: I couldn’t care less,” Brown Jr. says. “I did what was best for me at time. What I need you to do is what’s best for you.” The focus is the endgame, and the endgame is what Greg Brown III once told his father: He wanted to be an NBA legend. And if that is the case, then college is a means to an end, and sentimentality simply can’t factor into the decision. “They want me to be happy wherever I go,” Brown III says of his parents. “I just can’t put that factor in my decision. Because I gotta make the best decision for me and what I want to achieve.”

Wherever he goes, there won’t be one or two players hanging off his limbs on every possession. There won’t be junk defenses to clog up the spacing and limit the effectiveness of his speed and ability to handle the ball. He will not see what he has seen for four years running because there will be, as his high school coach puts it, other Greg Browns out there. Everyone is waiting expectantly to find out where Greg Brown III is going to go, yes. But it’s not about the vigil or the destination, at least not entirely. It’s about what he can be once he gets there.

For those who don't have an athletic subscription.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ah, ya gotta love that straight from the mouth of an alumnus

I'm not saying he's wrong about how to make the decision, but it would be preferable to hear him say "Obviously as a Longhorn I hope he picks UT, but only if that's what's best for him" or something along those lines. Not "I have no preference, Michigan, Memphis, Texas, it's all the same". 

 “I just told him: I couldn’t care less,” Brown Jr. says. “I did what was best for me at time. What I need you to do is what’s best for you.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

not to mention that Mama Brown and Uncle Brown ran track and played basketball respectively at Texas. 

Edited by Goo Punch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, SwanderedTalent said:

ah, ya gotta love that straight from the mouth of an alumnus

I'm not saying he's wrong about how to make the decision, but it would be preferable to hear him say "Obviously as a Longhorn I hope he picks UT, but only if that's what's best for him" or something along those lines. Not "I have no preference, Michigan, Memphis, Texas, it's all the same". 

 “I just told him: I couldn’t care less,” Brown Jr. says. “I did what was best for me at time. What I need you to do is what’s best for you.”

I don’t care that that’s his Dad’s attitude. Blood is thicker than college allegiance and we have a fucktard for a coach. I don’t like Brown Jr.’s public comments about his son’s HS teammates. What a jackass. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are Okie State and the G League legit options at this point, after GB III has had a "solid final five" for so long now? I sure hope not.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Goo Punch said:

Are Okie State and the G League legit options at this point, after GB III has had a "solid final five" for so long now? I sure hope not.

 

Jalen Green is probably doing it.....

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Goo Punch said:

fuuuuuu.....

if GB III goes pro out of nowhere he's going to piss off all of Austin, Texas. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That’s fine with me. Nothing has turned me off on college basketball more than the one and dones. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

welp, he's tripping if he doesn't take $400,000 over a year languishing under Shaka Smart. Bye bye Greg Brown. We hardly knew ye.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SA-KC_Horn said:

How in the fuck is G-League even an option? 

What the hell am I am missing here.?

Don't gotta play no skool yo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SA-KC_Horn said:

How in the fuck is G-League even an option? 

What the hell am I am missing here.?

Back in 2018, the NBA announced that starting this year, high school graduates would be able to play one year in the G league for $125,000 before being draft eligible instead of going to college:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/18/sports/nba-g-league-one-and-done.html

However, that structure was recently revamped in order to convince top players not to go overseas to play professionally before they were draft eligible (ala Lamelo Ball)

https://www.espn.com/nba/story/_/id/29043828/sources-top-high-school-player-jalen-green-enter-nba-g-league-pathway

Jalen Green, one of the top 2020 prospects is expected to make around $500,000 plus will be able to sign shoe and other endorsement deals. They will get placed on a Select Team, probably in SoCal, unaffiliated with a current NBA squad, that will focus on development, mentorship, life-skills, etc and will play against G-league teams (that don't count for G league standings), NBA academy teams, foreign teams, etc.

Excerpts:

"NBA commissioner Adam Silver and G League president Shareef Abdur-Rahim have worked to eliminate two massive hurdles to convincing players uninterested in college basketball to pass on the lucrative National Basketball League of Australia by providing a massive salary increase and a structure that doesn't include playing full time in the G League."

"...yearlong developmental program with G League oversight that will include professional coaching, top prospects and veteran players who will combine training and exhibition competitions against the likes of G League teams, foreign national teams and NBA academies throughout the world, sources said."

"The season could include 10 to 12 games against G League teams that wouldn't count in standings, sources said. The primary objective will be assimilation and growth into the NBA on several levels -- from playing to the teaching of life skills.

The salary bonus structure in Green's contract, for example, is expected to include financial incentives for games played, completing community events and attending life skills programs coordinated by the G League's oversight of the program, sources said.

The NBA's plan is to stock this team with veteran pro players who would be willing to balance mentorship of Green and other prospects with the personal opportunities that might emerge because of the intense NBA scouting exposure that will come with these teams."

"Without the restrictions of NCAA amateurism rules, players are free to hire agents, profit from likenesses and pursue marketing deals from sneaker companies worth hundreds of thousands of dollars."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Goo Punch said:

welp, he's tripping if he doesn't take $400,000 over a year languishing under Shaka Smart. Bye bye Greg Brown. We hardly knew ye.

400k really isn’t shit especially after taxes and an agent get theirs. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...