Jump to content
Both Tacos

Griddle me this Batman

Recommended Posts

but can you do an onion volcano?

I want to try one, but I never think about it until it’s too late.

I don’t know what the benefits for flaxseed oil are supposed to be, but it’s getting more popular. I think you’re supposed to be able to season it quicker and with less oil. Not really sure if it’s worth the extra cost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Jkwellborn said:


I want to try one, but I never think about it until it’s too late.

I don’t know what the benefits for flax seed oil are supposed to be, but it’s getting more popular. I think you’re supposed to be able to season it quicker and with less oil. Not really sure if it’s worth the extra cost.

Less heat probably because it has a lower smoke point.  But if you cook above that smoke point, I think the durability of the season degrades.  But whatever you use, use as little as possible and rub it in until it's not apparent that you used any oil at all.  It's in there, even when you can't see it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to try one, but I never think about it until it’s too late.

I don’t know what the benefits for flaxseed oil are supposed to be, but it’s getting more popular. I think you’re supposed to be able to season it quicker and with less oil. Not really sure if it’s worth the extra cost.
It may not be worth the extra $$$ but check the video I posted on the science behind why to use flaxseed oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think about the oiling a different way. Instead of "too much" or "enough" oil, just think that it is impossible to have "too little" oil. If you oil the surface and then wipe it repeatedly with a clean cloth, the remaining residue is just right for seasoning. You can try to wipe it as many times as you want using fresh cloth, you will never remove the residue layer (unless you wet wipe with soap) If you can see the oil layer, it's probably too thick. Super thin residue film, seasoned multiple times, is key to great seasoning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Hank_Hill said:

Since we're talking seasoning and there isn't a cast iron thread here, how do y'all go about reseasoning cast iron pans? Mines gotten a little rough in points, do you completely strip it first or just season on top of what's already there?

big fan of Serious Eats and Kenji Lopez-Alt's stuff generally: https://www.seriouseats.com/2010/06/how-to-buy-season-clean-maintain-cast-iron-pans.html

 

Spoiler

 

Initial Seasoning

When you first get your cast iron pan, it will have either a bullet-gray dull finish (for an unseasoned pan), or a black, slick-looking surface (for a preseasoned pan). Unless you are buying a 75-year-old pan from a garage sale, your pan will also have a pebbly-looking surface like this one:

20100608-cast-iron-fresh.jpg

Modern cast iron is bumpy like this because it's been cast in a sand-based mold as opposed to the solid molds old cast iron were cast in. Some people claim and that it's not possible to season these bumpy pans properly. I don't buy it. I have compared my shiny, totally smooth 1930s Griswold (acquired at a flea market) to my 10-year-old Lodge skillet (which I bought new and seasoned myself). The old stuff is certainly more non-stick, but the new Lodge pan is pretty darn close, and good enough for most needs.

So the key is all in seasoning it properly. How does it work?

Well, if you look at a cast iron pan under a microscope, you'll see all kinds of tiny little pores, cracks, and irregularities in the surface.* When food cooks, it can seep into these cracks, causing it to stick. Not only that, but proteins can actually form chemical bonds with the metal as it comes into contact with it. Ever have a piece of fish tear in half as you cook it because it seems like it's actually bonded with the pan? That's because it has.

To prevent both of these things from happening, you need to fill in the little pores, as well as creating a protective layer above the bottom of the pan to prevent protein from coming into contact with it. Enter fat.

When fat is heated in the presence of metal and oxygen, it polymerizes. Or, to put it more simply, it forms a solid, plasticlike substance that coats the pan. The more times oil is reheated in a pan, the thicker this coating gets, and the better the nonstick properties of the pan.

Here's how to build up the initial layer of seasoning in your pan:

  • Scrub your pan by pouring a half cup of kosher salt into it and rubbing it with a paper towel. This will scour out any dust and impurities that may have collected in it prior to use. Wash it thoroughly with hot, soapy water and dry it carefully.
  • Oil your pan by rubbing down every surface with a paper towel soaked in a highly unsaturated fat like corn, vegetable, or canola oil. Unsaturated fats are more reactive than saturated fats (like shortening, lard, or other animal-based fats), and thus polymerize better. It's an old myth that bacon fat or lard makes the best seasoning agent, probably borne of the fact that those fats were very cheap back in cast iron's heyday
  • Heat your pan by placing it in a 450°F oven for 30 minutes (it will smoke), until its surface is distinctly blacker than when you started. An oven will heat the pan more evenly than the stovetop will, leading to a better initial layer of seasoning
  • Repeat the oiling and heating steps three to four timesuntil your pan is nearly pitch black. Pull it out of the oven, place it on the stovetop to cool. Your pan is now seasoned and ready to go

 

and after use:

  • Spoiler

    Dry thoroughly, reheat it, and oil it before storing. After rinsing out my pan, I replace it on a burner and heat it until it just starts to smoke before rubbing the entire inside surface with a paper towel lightly dipped in oil. Take it off the heat, and let it cool to room temperature. The oil will form a protective barrier preventing it from coming into contact with moisture or air until its next use

     

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, mycox said:

You guys are overthinking this oil thing

Yeah...let’s get back to onion volcanos and, more importantly, catching shrimps with our hats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Hank_Hill said:

18 hours of seasoning time seems excessive

Sheryl is a bit intense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Gene Parmesan said:

I used an artisanal pistachio oil on mine.

Smoke point of pistachio is not high enough. 

I used paper towels for a year to collect the oil off of my nose and then a dehumidifier on the lowest setting to extract the liquid from the towels. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/7/2020 at 1:26 PM, Baboontyme said:

Smoke point of pistachio is not high enough. 

I used paper towels for a year to collect the oil off of my nose and then a dehumidifier on the lowest setting to extract the liquid from the towels. 

Are you Lebanese?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Burgers last night. Turned out great. 

Deer camp breakfast for 9  this morn.  Scrambled and fried eggs, hashed browns with unnins and serranos, bacon, pan sausage, English muffins and tortillas.  It was nice to have it all going at once rather than on skillets in the trailer.  

Phlliy cheese steaks tonight.   

Ironstone makes a great product. Very easy set up and seasoning process.  Like clubbing baby seals. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would be nice if those manufacturers would put leveling screws on the corners. It wouldn’t cost $5 and would make a huge difference on draining grease or keeping it where it’s needed.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it’s a pain trying to get the damn thing level every time you need it. I would move mine around so it would change a little.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Did an al pastor keto fried rice (riced cauliflower).  Used the Mi Tienda al pastor from HEB.  Peas, garlic, onion, broccoli, sesame oil, some garlic herbed oil, salt pepper, few eggs, etc. Didn't follow the al pastor thing through all the way, but griddling some pineapple and garnishing with cilantro would set it off.

 

B11-CEFEB-B056-4-CF6-98-DA-84-B0167-BAE8

 

D633-D58-D-A80-F-48-B3-9-D48-15-D72861-C  

 

69178-C0-B-165-C-4719-BEE9-EC3-D8-E63-F4

Edited by Anastasis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got some al pastor from a local place. Griddled it at work last weekend for the guys that work for me. Started to take some pictures for the thread, decided to eat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, I bet with this Sheltering in Place, the griddles have been getting used a lot more. I've cooked a few meals on it the past couple if weeks but didn't have phone out to snap pics but will do so next time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...