Jump to content
Texas007

Tell me about ou

Recommended Posts

15 minutes ago, Sbbruin said:

What's a good OU free football forum to follow?  Want to see if they are giving our game any consideration or are assuming it's a layup.

I assume by good you mean active.  As you will soon see, unless you are there to suck their dicks and tell them how great OU football is, there is no suck thing as a good  OU football forum  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Go Pokes said:

I assume by good you mean active.  As you will soon see, unless you are there to suck their dicks and tell them how great OU football is, there is no suck thing as a good  OU football forum  

Indeed what I mean.  I mean, I'm not sure you could call surly a "good" site.  Buncha heathens and vermin on here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sbbruin said:

Indeed what I mean.  I mean, I'm not sure you could call surly a "good" site.  Buncha heathens and vermin on here.

Definitely thefootballbrainiacs.  Good discussion (usually) and a fairly intelligent look inside the game, good perspective on recruiting and things of that nature.  During the season they get into opponents and, there are film study posts about the opposition and how they play, things like that.  It's the best OU board i've been to in terms of getting good information but sure, there will be some annoying tards on there too, like anywhere.  there's a texas page too. texas.thefootballbrainiacs.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure there’s enough lube on earth for the ramrodding we are going to experience on Saturday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many of them think they the same as a public ivy, because David Boren tried so hard to hang with that crowd. It was truly pathetic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, 'stache said:

Many of them think they the same as a public ivy, because David Boren tried so hard to hang with that crowd. It was truly pathetic.

Lol.  Maybe the T shirt idiots who never went to any college.  I don’t know a single grad who thinks of OU as a public ivy.  That’s actually comical.  

Boren was a pompous douche though.  No doubt about that.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, ChiTownDoc said:

Lol.  Maybe the T shirt idiots who never went to any college.  I don’t know a single grad who thinks of OU as a public ivy.  That’s actually comical.  

Boren was a pompous douche though.  No doubt about that.  

This! Also, are you my coworker? He says this any time Boren's name is mentioned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Longboard Horn said:

This! Also, are you my coworker? He says this any time Boren's name is mentioned.

Don’t think so but that guy sounds smart.  Give him a raise.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Sock Drawer said:

That's a disservice to Persian cats. 

You're really going to hate how it ends if that's how you feel about cats. DEVELOPING!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many raises did Stoops' agent get him by floating his name as a possible NFL HC every single year?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a sham!

  Passing          PTD's  
BJ Symons 5833 52  
Graham Harrell 5705 48  
Graham Harrell 5111 50  
Kliff Kingsbury 5017 45  
Patrick Mahomes 5052 45  
       
Baker Mayfield 4627 43  Heisman
Kyler Murray 4361 42  Heisman 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ESPN article.....

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/27808801/facing-longhorns-gets-personal-texans-mayfield-murray-jalen-hurts

"Facing Longhorns gets personal for Texans like Mayfield, Murray and Hurts"

Oct 9, 2019   Ivan Maisel.    ESPN Senior Writer

Jalen Hurts is the most experienced quarterback in college football and among the most successful in the history of the game. When he takes the field for No. 6 Oklahoma on Saturday (noon ET, Fox), Hurts will play in his 48th collegiate game. He is 31-2 as a starter. He played in three national championship games at Alabama.  Until the Sooners dropped to No. 6 in Week 5 of this season -- punished for the crime of taking off Week 4 -- Hurts had never played for a team ranked outside the top 5.  But as long as his college football résumé is, Hurts has never played in the Red River Showdown. He has never descended that concrete ramp in the Cotton Bowl on the second Saturday in October and been cold-cocked by that wall of sound.

Four decades have passed since Thomas Lott played quarterback at Oklahoma, and when Lott starts talking about playing Texas, he is 20 years old again, wearing a bandana underneath his helmet, running the wishbone for Barry Switzer and the Sooners.  "Walking down that ramp, and walking into that stadium, when you step onto that field, and that stadium erupts, there is no feeling in the world like that," Lott said. 

There's the setting, smack in the middle of the State Fair of Texas, beneath the benevolent gaze of Big Tex.  There's the 50-50 split of fans in the Cotton Bowl, 92,000 Texas Longhorns and Oklahoma Sooners proving what anyone who isn't colorblind already knows: Burnt orange and crimson clash off the field, too.  There's another characteristic unique to the Red River Showdown: So many Texans cross the border to play for Oklahoma. It is a sign of the sheer amount of football talent in Texas, a sign of the credibility that Oklahoma established after World War II and maintains to this day, from Bud Wilkinson to Chuck Fairbanks to Barry Switzer to Bob Stoops to Lincoln Riley.

For decades, Oklahoma has had more native Texans on its roster than it has had, to coin a lyric, Sooners born and Sooners bred.  

Hurts, for all his experience, has never taken the field as a Texas native wearing the crimson and cream of the Longhorns' biggest rival. Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield, who grew up a Sooners fan in Austin, Texas, trying to keep his head afloat in a sea of burnt orange, said it's "absolutely" a different experience.  "If you're born around it, and you know how much it truly means to the people that are invested in it every year," said Mayfield, who went 2-1 in three starts against the Longhorns, "I think it means a whole lot more."

Hurts grew up more interested in Texas A&M than he did Texas or OU, and, of course, he spent the past three seasons at Alabama more interested in the SEC than the Big 12.  "I see it. I hear it," he said this week of the hum of Texas-OU. "I respect the tradition here at this school. Obviously, people care about it a lot. I care about winning. I'll approach it that way. Try to go out there and handle business." If that sounds anodyne, bloodless, well, Hurts has some inkling that Saturday will be special. He knows the history of the Cotton Bowl and the 50-50 crowd.  "I've never been to the State Fair," Hurts said. "When I drive home to Houston, I ride by the stadium and get a glimpse of it. Any of my family members that have driven from Houston [to the Oklahoma campus], they always mention passing the stadium."

Knowing that the Cotton Bowl isn't just any stadium will help. Hurts, like former Aggie Kyler Murray, transferred into this rivalry and will get only one shot at it. Murray, now with the Arizona Cardinals, said this week, "It's different than any other game.". This season will mark the sixth consecutive season in which a Texas native has started at QB for OU, from Trevor Knight of San Antonio (2014), to Mayfield of Austin (2015 to 2017) to Murray of Allen (2018) to Hurts of Channelview, 15 miles east of Houston. In the six decades before that, for all the Texans who played for Oklahoma, there hadn't been a whole lot of quarterbacks.

The most famous spiriting of a Texan across the border occurred in the fall of 1967, when a young Oklahoma assistant named Barry Switzer became an unofficial member of the Mildren family in Abilene as he pursued Jack Mildren.  "I spent every Thursday night in Abilene, Texas, with Larry and Mary Glynne [Jack's parents]," Switzer said, "and ate with them, and I sat in the easy rocking chair and watched Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton with Larry Mildren."  Mildren signed with Oklahoma and never looked back. He started at quarterback when the Sooners converted to the wishbone in 1970, started for them as a senior in 1971 when Oklahoma went 11-1 and finished second to Nebraska. Mildren put down roots in Oklahoma and the state rewarded him by electing him lieutenant governor in 1990. He died in 2008 at age 58.

Switzer, as an assistant and, by 1973, as the Oklahoma head coach, became renowned for signing African American players out of Texas while his counterpart in Austin, Darrell Royal, dithered. Switzer signed Lott out of San Antonio in the winter of 1975, even though, on signing day, Switzer had to improvise. Wendell Mosley, the assistant recruiting Lott, didn't bring the national letter of intent. "We get ready to sign him," Switzer said, "and all of a sudden I asked Wendell, 'Hey, Wendell, you got the papers?''  'Naw.'  "I said, 'Wendell, the head coach doesn't bring the damn national signing papers.'"   Switzer stalled the Lotts for four hours while a plane carrying no passengers delivered the paperwork from Norman to San Antonio.  By his sophomore year, 1976, Lott debuted as a starter against Texas.  "We knew that the players we were playing against at the University of Texas were some of the best players in the state of Texas because we had played against them," Lott said. "We had played with them. We respected the players. It was the university. The university was the problem we had. That burnt orange color. The Longhorn emblem on the helmet."

Paul Thompson, who grew up just north of Austin, started at quarterback for Oklahoma as a fifth-year senior in a 28-10 loss in 2006. Thompson turned down a scholarship offer from Longhorns coach Mack Brown because the Texas staff wanted Thompson to play wide receiver, not quarterback.  "He had a nice one," Thompson said. "Vince [Young] was coming in. We were the same year."  Once Thompson committed to Oklahoma, he said players on the other side of the line of scrimmage called him "traitor" and "Okie."

"It was kind of weird," said Thompson, 35, now an entrepreneur in Edmond, Oklahoma. "I was the one out there, I was the one sacrificing my body. All my friends back home? If they wanted to call and talk noise, at the end of the day, I'm the one who has to go out on that field. You can just bump your gums and yap and you don't have to actually produce anything. So you get to the point where you mute your phone. Leading up to that week, it was personal."

Bob Stoops, who coached Oklahoma from 1999 through 2016, signed Thompson and many other future Sooners stars out of Texas.  "There's a little bit of, 'Where are your parents going to work if you go up there to Oklahoma?'" Stoops said. "I used to tell kids if that ever did come up, 'This is America. You don't need a passport to get up to Oklahoma. What are you going do if the New England Patriots draft you in the first or second round? Are you going to tell them you can't go? You gotta stay in Texas?'"

On the other hand, Stoops didn't sign his last quarterback, Mayfield, as a recruit. Mayfield showed up as a transfer, as did Murray, as did Hurts. The three of them took a more circuitous route from Texas to Oklahoma. And on the second Saturday in October, they return to Dallas, right at home in a crimson helmet.

Jake Trotter and Josh Weinfuss contributed to this story.

 

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Valmy77 said:

We get another OU dick sucking article from ESPN every year now.

Until Texas whips some gooner ass and Wins a B12 Championship again, all the writers will keep sucking blOU, bama and clemson's teets...

 

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there was a woman behind me in the line at whole foods today wearing the full litany of sooner junk, trucker hat, jersey, etc, etc. i had a texas hat on and saw her look at it, so i'm thinking oh shit, here we go. however she started up the conversation with "you have any idea where i might find oklahoma suks beer?" gotta admit, i was a bit stunned for a second so i could only respond with a laugh at first and then "heb, if it's open", of course. thanked me, gave her a parting "ou sucks", she gave me a horns down, and that was that.

as much as i loathe the sooner degens that make it out to the game/fair, i love this fucking rivalry. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh great. Look what just strolled into my hotel. He may or may not be wearing shoulder pads.24cc79744896c57336b57a711b3d9567.jpg


He can really pull off the layered look unsuccessfully.

x 1

Chick is "Hot or Not" worthy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This trick helps explain why Lincoln Riley is so good at calling plays

By Zach Barnett -
 October 16, 2019
 
Lincoln-Riley.jpg?zoom=1.5&resize=514%2C Credit: Getty Images

In four and a half seasons as Oklahoma’s offensive coordinator and head coach, Lincoln Riley has called 4,267 plays. Those plays have covered 33,933 yards — that’s 7.95 yards a play, every play, over nearly 60 games, with three different quarterbacks and dozens of different skill players and linemen — and 362 touchdowns.

And Riley remembers just about all of them.  The hosts of Riley’s weekly radio show like to play a parlor game with him, picking out a random situation from Riley’s past and asking him to remember the play call. And he’s 7-for-7 so far.

 

On the 1-to-10 difficulty scale, this is about a seven. It’s not completely random — “Tell us your 2nd-and-6 call with 5:45 left in the second quarter against Kansas in 2016” — but it’s not easy either. This was Riley’s second game at Oklahoma, a monumental comeback win over the 23rd-ranked Volunteers that Bob Stoops would later describe as one of his favorite wins at OU. It was also 57 games ago, and Riley recalls his play call within a minute.

It’s a trait he shares with another play-calling savant.

The recall that Riley and McVay have helps explain why they’re among the best at what they do — they have very little life outside of football, and their mental rolodex for play calls has more entries than the Library of Congress.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This may be the best tweet I've seen in a long, long time......Thought for sure it would be here already.....

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do the ponies and these two women have in common?

They’re both draggin that wagon boi!!!

9482e54b34a8ef9762eb6a112d971fe5.jpg
85ffe4d5a2d2e28f32abdd9071328684.jpg

Edited by Longboard Horn
Lol I'm drunk!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eh, I’m always going to root against the school that harbored a rape culture and, for all intents and purposes, walked away without a scratch.

Baylor should be winless and shamed forever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...