Jump to content
LTtxfan

2020 CFB Catch All Thread

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

10 game B10 Conference only schedule... ut oh ūüėē

"The Big Ten conference announced on Thursday that it will play a conference-only football schedule in the fall of 2020. The conference-only season will be 10 games, according to Sports Illustrated's Pat Forde."

https://www.si.com/college/2020/07/09/big-ten-conference-only-schedule-2020

 

 

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

 

The Pac-12 is expected to go to a conference-only schedule in the coming days, according to The Athletic. The ACC also is expected to shift to conference-only games, with independent Notre Dame joining the league for those games, according to Stadium’s Brett McMurphy.

 

 

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was this a shot across the bow to the SEC?  Is the B1G playing heavy handed in sync with Pac12?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Damn Dp...

Why the Pac-12 decided to go conference-only games in its fall s
 
Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/29442565/what-do-pac-12-big-ten-decisions-mean-college-football 

What do Pac-12 and Big Ten decisions mean for college football?

Jul 10, 2020          ESPN

The Pac-12 has decided to go to a conference-only model for fall sports, following the lead of the Big Ten, which announced the same move on Thursday.   It's the latest setback during a college football offseason that has been upended by the coronavirus pandemic, and is almost assuredly not the last domino to fall as conferences attempt to cobble together a season.

While so much about the season remains unknown, here's what we know now that 40% of the Power 5 has moved to conference-only football schedules.

Are the ACC, Big 12 and SEC going to follow suit? If so, when?

It seems to be trending that way.

"Over the last few months, our conference has prepared numerous scenarios related to the fall athletics season," ACC commissioner John Swofford said. "The league membership and our medical advisory group will make every effort to be as prepared as possible during these unprecedented times, and we anticipate a decision by our board of directors in late July."

One ACC source said it is "very likely" the ACC is headed to a conference-only season but reiterated it is a week-to-week discussion that continues to evolve.

The SEC will discuss its options during a meeting Monday with athletic directors and league officials that was scheduled before the Big Ten's decision.

SEC commissioner Greg Sankey said in a statement last week there should be more clarity about the season by late July, and issued a similar statement to ESPN on Friday, referencing "the coming weeks."

"The Southeastern Conference will continue to meet regularly with our campus leaders in the coming weeks, guided by medical advisors, to make the important decisions necessary to determine the best path forward related to the SEC fall sports," the statement read. "We recognize the challenges ahead and know the well-being of our student-athletes, coaches, staff and fans must remain at the forefront of those decisions."

How likely is a spring season at this point?

More likely than a couple of weeks ago, but it's still viewed as a last resort by many. A spring season raises a new batch of questions regarding player safety -- can they physically handle two seasons, even shortened ones, in one calendar year? -- the NFL draft and uncertainty about the state of the virus and a vaccine by the new year.

Spring football is an option, Duke coach David Cutcliffe said on Friday, "when it's the only option left," echoing sentiments by Penn State AD Sandy Barbour and Bowlsby, who both called it a "last resort."

American Athletic Conference commissioner Mike Aresco went even further.

"We don't have much of an appetite for spring football ... we're not confident that spring football, if we don't play in the fall, will even happen," he said. "Especially if there's no vaccine. And we're not really sure that it's not going to compromise part of the 2021 season if you're playing in the spring. Also, if you have to practice in the middle of the winter to get ready for your spring football, you're practicing indoors, are you going to spread the virus more easily in that scenario? These are rational questions that have to be answered."

Not everyone is so skeptical, though.

"I think the people who say it's not [an option], in my opinion, just don't want to think about it," Oklahoma coach Lincoln Riley said earlier this month. "I just think it would be wrong of us to take any potential option off the table right now. I think it'd be very difficult to say the spring is not a potential option. I, for one, think it's very doable. ...

"It'd probably be a conference season and postseason only. We've seen often teams go in and play well into January in the College Football Playoff and start spring practice at some point in February, and nobody says a word about that. You'd have to give players plenty of time off to get their bodies back in the summer. Maybe a little later start back the next fall."

What does conference-only play mean for Notre Dame?
The Fighting Irish have now lost three marquee games -- Wisconsin, USC and Stanford. The most likely and expected scenario remains for Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick and ACC commissioner Swofford to extend their partnership and have the Irish fill the rest of their schedule with ACC games. Notre Dame is already set to play six ACC opponents.

What about other teams scheduled to play the Big Ten or Pac-12 in nonconference?
To be determined. After the Big Ten and Pac-12 announcements, conferences and teams affected put out statements that were similar to this one from Mountain West commissioner Craig Thompson:

"We were aware of this possibility and will continue to evaluate the appropriate decisions and the proper timing going forward. The safety, health, and wellness of our student-athletes, coaches, staff members and campuses remain our top priority."

After Alabama's showcase opener against USC was canceled, Crimson Tide AD Greg Byrne said "we will do our best to adjust."

Speaking of marquee games, which high-profile ones have been canceled so far?

Oregon has lost two fascinating ones, first with FCS power North Dakota State and its NFL draft darling QB Trey Lance. Then the Ducks were slated to host Ohio State in Week 2.

USC loses games with Alabama and Notre Dame, and the Irish also will miss playing Wisconsin at Lambeau Field in Green Bay. Jim Harbaugh and Michigan were scheduled to open the season at Washington, and the Utah-BYU rivalry game is also off for the year. BYU could lose as many as six games off of its schedule if the rest of the Power 5 leagues follow suit.

What will the season look like for the Pac-12 and Big Ten?

For the Pac-12, it will be delayed.

One of the reasons the conference decided to push back the start of the football season was a concern that UCLA and USC would not be ready to play in early September because of coronavirus cases in the Los Angeles area, sources told ESPN.

Big Ten officials, meanwhile, are still considering the possibility of moving its division games to the front of the schedule, in case the season is interrupted by the coronavirus. That way, it might still be able to determine a championship through division winning percentage in spite of an incomplete season.

Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith is still hoping for a full, 10-game conference schedule.

"I'm hopeful that that's where we end up next week in locking that down," he said. "We've talked about that, and that's our preference."

"We have not delved deep into those details yet," Smith added. "I anticipate next week we'll get into the details of how our schedules will work."

Smith also said if teams are able to play in September but something happens later in the month or in October, "we can hit the pause button and provide a window of opportunity for our student-athletes not to be put at risk. We can move games. ... There's a flexibility, I can't say that enough, that's significant."

Get used to it. If there is going to be a season this year, every option needs to be on the table.

What does this mean for the College Football Playoff and bowl games?

CFP executive director Bill Hancock has told ESPN that the playoff will be ready for "whatever comes down." As for the overall bowl system, the immediate impact is unknown. It depends in part on what the other conferences decide. If the other Power 5 conferences follow the Big Ten's lead and play only conference games, overall league depth will be the most significant factor in the eyes of the CFP selection committee. Teams from top-heavy leagues and divisions might have more trouble since they won't have the opportunity to secure big nonconference victories, particularly if they stumble in conference play.

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

one of my favorite annual reads...

Bruce Feldman’s 2020 college football Freaks List

since this is the catch-all thread, of particular interest to me personally...

8. Racey McMath, LSU, wide receiver

Freakiest attribute: Speed

This is the top freak on a team full of freaky athletes. The Tigers staff is expecting a breakout season from the senior this year with Justin Jefferson having left for the NFL and opening up a starting spot. Prior to this season, McMath proved to be a special teams demon and a solid backup, catching 17 passes for 285 yards and three TDs in 2019. At 6-3, 224 he is exceptionally fast and strong, benching almost 400 pounds to go with a 4.39 40.

19. Ja’Marr Chase, LSU, wide receiver

Freakiest attribute: Separating strength

The Biletnikoff Award winner as the nation‚Äôs top wideout, Chase has incredibly strong hands and a powerful lower body, which make him virtually uncoverable. Just ask Clemson. He has continued to get much faster since coming to LSU, clocking a 4.40 at 6-0, 208 pounds. He‚Äôs also power cleaned 330 pounds this off-season. ‚ÄúHe‚Äôs special,‚ÄĚ LSU coach Ed Orgeron said. ‚ÄúHe‚Äôs such a stud. He has worked his butt off. He is so strong and the way he can come in and out of his breaks, running full speed, putting his foot in the grass, turning and catching the ball, guys have never seen someone do it like he can.‚ÄĚ

 

34. Damone Clark, LSU, linebacker

Freakiest attribute: Speed/strength combo

JaCoby Stevens is another big athlete in the middle of the LSU defense who timed really well in the 40 and could have made the list this year. I went with Clark, who at 6-3, 245, is even bigger yet still ran a 4.50 in the 40. The junior also bench presses 405 pounds, squats 600 and cleans 352. Clark (22 tackles in 2019) is one of those guys the Tigers staff expects to have a breakthrough season in 2020. They’ve gushed about his smarts, work ethic and athleticism for a while now. ...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

https://247sports.com/Article/College-Football-new-rule-changes-2020-149388033/

 

The new rule changes in college football you need to know

By. BRANDON MARCELLO   91 minutes ago

Rules are meant to be bent.  They’re also meant to be changed.  College football made a slew of changes in the offseason heading into the 2020-21 season, and with the discussions and decisions are several rules that would have affected the outcomes of games in previous seasons, particularly in big-time rivalry games near the end of the season.

As a refresher, 247Sports examined the rule changes (along with new rules) to provide a refresher course for fans before the start of the 2020-21 season.  These rules were approved by the NCAA Football Rules Committee and the Playing Rules Oversight Panel in April, and were written by Steve Shaw, the rules editor for the NCAA Football Rules Committee.

Check out the 11 changes and additions to the lengthy college football rulebook and how they will affect the future (and could have affected past games):

  • Certain ejected players allowed on sidelines

Players who are charged with targeting and are ejected from the game will be able to remain on the sidelines. Players were previously forced to leave the sidelines for the locker room, where they had to watch the remainder of the game on television.  Players ejected for targeting in the second half can remain on the sideline through the end of the game and may also participate in pre-game, warm-up activities at the next game, though they will remain suspended from playing through the first half and can remain on the sideline interacting with teammates.

  • New penalties requiring ejection

Players charged with fighting, two unsportsmanlike conduct fouls or flagrant personal fouls are reclassified as fouls requiring ejection. Those players will not be allowed to stay on the sideline after ejection and must ‚Äúremain out of view of the field of play under team supervision,‚ÄĚ according to the NCAA Football Rules Committee and the Playing Rules Oversight Panel.

  • New pre-game warmup requirements

All players’ jersey numbers must be visible during pre-game warmups and an assistant coach or the head coach must be on the field during warmups before team captains or escorted to the field for the coin toss. This could drastically change the game-day routines for kickers and punters, who usually warm up on the field well before other teammates and do so, sometimes, without their jerseys. Assistant coaches are also usually in the locker room two hours before the game, leaving team managers to help with kickers. Kickers will now be required to be supervised by an assistant coach. If a player’s jersey number is not visible or an assistant coach is not guiding their warmup, they must leave the playing field.

Florida coach Dan Mullen is notorious for allowing his players to not wear jerseys during pre-game warmups in an effort to hide injured players and personnel lineups from opposing coaches.

  • Relaxing the defensive substitution rule

Defenses will be allowed to have 12 or more men on the field ‚Äúto anticipate the offensive formation,‚ÄĚ but must have 11 players on the field when the ball is snapped. The rule change is a direct result of a trick formation in the Alabama-Auburn rivalry in which Auburn lined up its quarterback at punter and its punter at receiver on fourth down late in a close game. Alabama kept 12 men on the field trying to substitute players before the snap and were charged with a foul, resulting in a first down for Auburn, which was able to ice the game on the ensuing set of downs.

  • Protection for long snappers

Defenders are not allowed to line up within the body frame of a long snapper when within one yard of the line of scrimmage. Defensive players may not initiate contact with the longer snapper until 1 second has passed after the snap. The rule Is meant to ‚Äúenhance the protection‚ÄĚ of snappers, according to the NCAA.

  • Limiting duplicate numbers

No more than two team members may be assigned the same jersey number. There previously was not a limit to duplicate numbers. Such a violation will be for unsportsmanlike conduct against the head coach. Players will be required to immediately change jersey numbers.

  • Penalty carry-overs

All penalties at the end of a half will have the option to be carried to the ensuing kickoff and to the succeeding spot in overtime.

Extended jurisdiction for officials

Game officials will now oversee all action on the playing surface 90 minutes before kickoff. Official were previously in charge starting at 60 minutes before the kickoff. At least three officials will be on the field 90 minutes before kickoff. Also, all officials must be on the field 40 minutes before kickoff.¬† The usual buffer zone near midfield separating the two teams as they warm up before the game will begin ‚Äúno later than 40 minutes before kickoff,‚ÄĚ according to the NCAA. It‚Äôs believed the time extension will curb extracurricular activities and arguments between teams during warm-ups.

Kentucky quarterback Lynn Bowden threw a punch at a Virginia Tech player before warmups of the Belk Bowl in December, but because the altercation occurred outside the 60-minute rule, he was not ejected and was allowed to play.

  • The¬†Nick Saban¬†Rule

Another controversial play in the Iron Bowl last season resulted in a change in the NCAA rulebook. If a clock expires at the end of a half, but replay shows there is time remaining on the clock, there must be at least 3 seconds remaining on the clock for a play to be run if the clock is running upon the referee’s whistle.

If the clock is running and it is determined 2 seconds or less remain on the running clock, the half is over. If the clock is stopped, however, and more time is added to the clock after a run out of bounds or an incomplete pass, a play with 2 seconds or less remaining after replay review will be allowed to be conducted.¬† A similar review before halftime last season in the Iron Bowl determined 1 second was remaining on the clock following a running-clock play by Auburn. Auburn was allowed to snap the ball quickly and kick a 52-yard field as time expired before halftime. Alabama coach¬†Nick Saban¬†argued against the ability of a ball to be snapped in less than 1 second upon a ref‚Äôs whistle with a running clock. His argument fell on deaf ears ‚ÄĒ until the NCAA considered new rules in the offseason.

Auburn went on to beat Alabama 48-45. The rule change in April led to a sarcastic tweet from Auburn coach Gus Malzahn directed at his rival.

‚ÄúInteresting rule change,‚ÄĚ he tweeted, with two emojis of a person rubbing their chin.


Replay reviews shortened

Think of this as more of a guideline rather than a rule. Instant replay officials are expected to conduct and complete their reviews in 2 minutes or less starting with the 2020 college football season. There is one caveat: ‚Äúif the review has end-of-game impact or has multiple aspects as a part of the review, it should be completed efficiently but will have no stated time limit.‚ÄĚ


New number allowed on jerseys

Players will be allowed to wear ‚Äú0‚ÄĚ as their jersey number starting this season. The number was previously illegal. Players, however, will not be allowed to wear double-digit numbers with zero proceeding the second number (example: 01 or 00).

Uniform violations

Two players wearing the same jersey number on the field at the same time is still illegal, and so are vests or altered jerseys (velcro, clasps, fasteners). Violation of these rules will result in a 15-yard penalty after the kickoff of each half and a loss of a timeout in each quarter an illegal jersey is worn by a player

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So just listening to an SEC journalist (can‚Äôt remember who) on ESPNU‚Äôs ‚ÄúFull Ride‚ÄĚ who had some interesting takes.

- totally defended the 8 plus 1 approach to the SEC schedule.  So that games like LSU v Texas could take place.  I wonder if it means Alabama v the Citadel (or whatever patsy they have tee’d up since their tough game-USC- is off because of the P12 decision) can also take place.

- thought Texas’ idea of 50% capacity idea was asinine.  All games should be fan free.  I kinda of agree.

- his expectation was that they would fight like hell to get the first game played.  After that, just wait and see.  I guess if the season was 2 games long, it would be better than no games.
 

I personally think there’s a low likelihood this season sees its end.  Unless it’s punted until later.  What a weird time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Bleacher Report projects preseason Top 25 rankings

 

9. TEXAS LONGHORNS

9819170.jpg?fit=bounds&crop=620:320,offs

(Photo: Daniel Dunn, USA TODAY Sports)

Bleacher Report: "An Oklahoma-sized obstacle stands between Texas and a Big 12 title, while trips to LSU and Oklahoma State loom as marquee games for the Longhorns."

247Sports take: Chris Ash inherits a defense that largely underachieved last season for various reasons and will continue the development of Joseph Ossai and Caden Sterns, two leaders on that side. The most important player for Texas is quarterback Sam Ehlinger. This team's championship hopes ride on his shoulders. If he can stay healthy, new OC Mike Yurcich believes the sky is the limit for this offense.

 

(aggy #10 ūüėā)

https://247sports.com/LongFormArticle/College-football-Top-25-rankings--149394656/Amp/?__twitter_impression=true

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, LTtxfan said:
ūüėā

 

Edited by LTtxfan
Brainfart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/29531554/some-top-prospects-taking-loans-pay-their-own-insurance

 

Some top prospects taking out loans to pay for their own insurance

Jul 24, 2020. Alex Scarborough  Mark Schlabach

Some pro prospects in college football are reaching into their own pockets and taking out sizable loans in order to offset the cost of permanent and total disability policies and loss-of-value insurance riders that would typically be paid for in large part by a fund distributed to schools by the NCAA.

Due to the cancellation of winter and spring championships because of the coronavirus, including the NCAA basketball tournament, the NCAA reduced its distribution to Division I conferences and schools by about $375 million to $225 million. As a result, the Student Assistance Fund, which helps to pay for things like insurance, clothes, computers and other necessities, was slashed from $87.1 million to $27.3 million, which is divided among schools based upon a formula that takes into account different factors such as the number of athletes receiving Pell grants.

It's at the school's discretion how that money is spent. Since 2014, schools have been able to use those funds to pay insurance premiums.

One prospect from a Big 12 school, who spoke to ESPN on the condition of anonymity, said he was told before the pandemic that the college he attends would be covering the entirety of the premium for his permanent and total disability policy, which cost approximately $30,000 and would provide him $3 million in coverage if he were to sustain a career-ending injury. Then the coronavirus swept across the country and everything changed.

The player said he was told recently that the Student Assistance Fund had been reduced and that the school would only be able to provide $5,000 toward the insurance premium, leaving him to take out a loan for the remaining $25,000.

The player fears the risk of playing during the pandemic, citing potential side effects of COVID-19 such as reduced lung capacity. What's more, he said a lack of a normal offseason conditioning program could lead to more injuries than normal.

"So you can't even grant me protection on the field?" the player said of his school. "Even though this is a sport, we feel like essential workers. And we're not getting paid and we're not getting any type of benefit -- nothing. We're just here in the midst of it all."

Eric Chenowith, who owns and operates Leverage Disability and Life Insurance Services and placed more than 70 college football and college basketball policies last year, told ESPN that he's experienced similar issues of college athletes not getting the usual support from schools to pay premiums and taking out loans to make up the difference.

One broker, who spoke on the condition of anonymity in order to preserve relationships with universities, said he has three different clients from the ACC who are taking out loans of roughly $20,000; one player was denied any financial assistance from his school while the two others were being given 50% of the cost of a permanent and total disability policy and nothing for a loss-of-value rider. "And in the grand scheme of things, loss-of-value is the most important," the broker said, because PTD is difficult to collect since there are so few career-ending injuries anymore."

An insurance consultant who works with several Power 5 programs said the combination of a shortfall in the SAF and a fear of unknown revenues in the coming months has caused the shift. "Funds have been significantly reduced," the consultant said.

Keith Lerner of Total Planning Sports Services in Gainesville, Florida, wrote policies for Florida State's Jameis Winston, Oregon's Marcus Mariota, Georgia's Todd Gurley, Miami's Frank Gore and others in the past. The Winston insurance package was reportedly $10 million -- $5 million in disability and $5 million in loss of value -- and Florida State paid a $55,000 premium for one year of coverage during Winston's sophomore season in 2014, a year after he guided the Seminoles to a national championship and won the Heisman Trophy.

Lerner said that in the past five years, the SAF has increasingly become a source that many schools have used to pay for players' insurance policies. He called it a "major recruiting tool for the five-star student-athletes" and that occasionally he'll have parents of high school seniors inquire with him about which schools may and may not pay the premiums.

"There's going to be less money this year, and I think it's going to be a conference-by-conference deal," he said.

"We have had some players who have inquired and said they would have to foot the bill themselves. We explain to them, 'Look, the disability insurance is protecting them.' If the school is able to do it, that's a nice benefit. But if not, it's still something important to have in order to protect your career. End of the day, a player has to make a decision, whether a school is going to kick in or not with regards to insurance."

Not all players are being impacted, including some who took out policies and paid their premium before the pandemic. A source told ESPN that Oregon paid the premiums of offensive lineman Penei Sewell and safety Jevon Holland -- projected first-round picks -- in the spring. However, industry experts said that the majority of draftable football players either take out or renew policies during the summer months.

A Big Ten athletics director told ESPN that the school had paid for insurance policies for its NFL prospects before spring practice.

Brokers said players they've dealt with from the SEC have had a less difficult time securing funding from their schools. According to SEC associate commissioner Herb Vincent, the conference's executive committee made the decision this year to fund the SAF at the same levels as last year, using the unrestricted revenues provided by the NCAA.

In an email sent to Division I presidents and chancellors, conference commissioners, athletic directors and other administrators, the NCAA said that unrestricted funds were given to provide latitude to conferences and "stressed the importance of using the distributions to aid college athletes during this current uncertain environment, along with the importance of planning carefully with less revenue."

Permanent and total disability policies and loss-of-value insurance riders have become increasingly popular in recent years as a tool to mitigate the risk of career-ending injuries. Loss-of-value riders are generally offered only to potential top-15 picks, while permanent and total disability policies can cover Rounds 1-4.

According to Chenowith, top-five NFL draft picks generally qualify for $20 million of permanent total disability with a $7.5 million loss-of-value rider. Picks 5-10 qualify for $10 million PTD and $5 million loss-of-value, and picks 10-15 qualify for $7.5 million PTD and $2.5 million loss-of-value.

Lerner said the premiums, on average, cost about $8,000 to $10,000 for each $1 million in coverage for one year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/21/2020 at 1:23 PM, Kyrie Eleison said:

one of my favorite annual reads...

Bruce Feldman’s 2020 college football Freaks List

since this is the catch-all thread, of particular interest to me personally...

8. Racey McMath, LSU, wide receiver

Freakiest attribute: Speed

This is the top freak on a team full of freaky athletes. The Tigers staff is expecting a breakout season from the senior this year with Justin Jefferson having left for the NFL and opening up a starting spot. Prior to this season, McMath proved to be a special teams demon and a solid backup, catching 17 passes for 285 yards and three TDs in 2019. At 6-3, 224 he is exceptionally fast and strong, benching almost 400 pounds to go with a 4.39 40.

19. Ja’Marr Chase, LSU, wide receiver

Freakiest attribute: Separating strength

The Biletnikoff Award winner as the nation‚Äôs top wideout, Chase has incredibly strong hands and a powerful lower body, which make him virtually uncoverable. Just ask Clemson. He has continued to get much faster since coming to LSU, clocking a 4.40 at 6-0, 208 pounds. He‚Äôs also power cleaned 330 pounds this off-season. ‚ÄúHe‚Äôs special,‚ÄĚ LSU coach Ed Orgeron said. ‚ÄúHe‚Äôs such a stud. He has worked his butt off. He is so strong and the way he can come in and out of his breaks, running full speed, putting his foot in the grass, turning and catching the ball, guys have never seen someone do it like he can.‚ÄĚ

 

34. Damone Clark, LSU, linebacker

Freakiest attribute: Speed/strength combo

JaCoby Stevens is another big athlete in the middle of the LSU defense who timed really well in the 40 and could have made the list this year. I went with Clark, who at 6-3, 245, is even bigger yet still ran a 4.50 in the 40. The junior also bench presses 405 pounds, squats 600 and cleans 352. Clark (22 tackles in 2019) is one of those guys the Tigers staff expects to have a breakthrough season in 2020. They’ve gushed about his smarts, work ethic and athleticism for a while now. ...

 

Posting-Tip-45-LSU.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/29510375/three-chick-fil-kickoff-games-awaiting-word-opening-matchups

Three Chick-fil-A Kickoff Games still awaiting word on opening matchups

Jul 21, 2020    Andrea AdelsonESPN Senior Writer

With the ACC, Big 12 and SEC waiting until next week to make a decision about their respective season schedules, three prominent Chick-fil-A Kickoff Games remain in limbo.

If those three conferences follow the Big Ten and Pac-12 into going to conference-only play due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Florida State-West Virginia, Georgia-Virginia and Auburn-North Carolina games set for Weeks 1 and 2 in Atlanta would be canceled -- a loss that Peach Bowl CEO Gary Stokan estimates at $100 million in economic impact.

"If we didn't have COVID-19, we were on our way to selling all three games out," Stokan said in a phone interview with ESPN. "We would have had over $100 million in economic impact and probably $7.5 million flow back into the tourism industry here locally in Atlanta. So it's a big loss to the community if we have no games. If we have some capacity, we can still make a little bit of money for the tourism industry because they've been shut out of everything. We could be a little bit of a bright spot."

This is the first time in the Kickoff Game's history that they arranged to play three games to open the season. Though Stokan has no say in the final outcome, he has tried to play scheduling matchmaker for them.

If the three decided to adopt a model of conference games plus one nonconference game, the SEC/ACC rivalry games between Florida-Florida State, Georgia-Georgia Tech, Louisville-Kentucky and Clemson-South Carolina would surely be saved.

That model would impact two teams in the three scheduled Kickoff Games. Stokan has pitched pairing Virginia-West Virginia to fill the gaps and at least save two of the three games.

In addition, he also pitched Notre Dame-Alabama and Notre Dame-Miami to all three of those schools' athletic directors, as they all have holes in their schedules from games that were canceled by the Big Ten and Pac-12.

Stokan doesn't know whether any of his ideas have any traction, but he felt he had to do something to at least try.

"I've got to throw a Hail Mary out, because if I don't and they go conference-only, we lose three Kickoff Games," Stokan said.

Stokan said if the conferences decided to keep the games but push back the start of the season, Mercedes-Benz Stadium would still be able to host the games. In fact, he said the stadium is prepared to host all three Kickoff Games, the SEC championship game and the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl at any time on the schedule -- including in the spring.

"We have to be as flexible as possible, and we will be with respect to our partners at College Football Playoff, to the bowl game and the conference commissioners for the Kickoff Games," Stokan said. "If they want to put us in September, if they want to put is in October, if they want to start the season with conference games and play the plus-one at the end, we're able to do that. We're able to move our bowl game back. We're able to play in March or May if they play in the springtime.

"Whenever they need us to play the game, all the Football Bowl Association bowl directors feel the same way: We'll be as flexible as they need us to be."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did not realize the entire purpose of rule changes was to right any wrong ever committed against Nick Saban. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Newy25 said:

I did not realize the entire purpose of rule changes was to right any wrong ever committed against Nick Saban. 

He paid folks off with Mountain Dew Moon Pies.?!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found the cure: just make all teams fielded, have players shorter than 5 foot 11 inches...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
‚Äč
√ó
√ó
  • Create New...