Jump to content

Wine


Hollywood

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, Jimbaround said:


Sparkling cab?

Yep, it was incredible. For background, they are only non-members of the Fellowship of Friends cult to farm their vineyards, who produced the legendary Renaissance cabs. Along with Dani Rozman, they are making some of the best wine in California right now in North Yuba County. Smoke damage was bad in 2020, so to remove the skins they did a white cab (which was ok) and then this sparkling. Most places in SF are cellaring it so we were lucky to get a bottle. I know the old David Keck places in Houston have a relationship. 
 

Also, Partida Creus imo. 

 

Edited by We’reTexas
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hope those were patiently waiting in your cellar and you didn’t have to pay current market prices. Look forward to your thoughts on both. 

Both of these bottles have been resting in friends cellars for years! Current market prices have me thinking about selling my collection. I'm perfectly content drinking QPR wines everyday!

The Leroy was mind boggling. Best wine of the year so far. And Roulot holds a special place in my heart! White burg is so darn good but the cost has gotten insane!
  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/7/2022 at 7:23 AM, VABuckeye said:

I opened a bottle of Chateau Smith Haut Lafitte last week.  It was very enjoyable.

That one was the Blanc.  Very good. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Couple nice drank bottles last night. Mag of 1997 burgundy and a 1972 Sterling.

Sterling didn’t have any fruit left but it was a friends 50th bday and was a nice treat to be able to open it.

Not pictured was the 1953 Petrus that I held and definitely was not allowed to open.

5f12353ec6afd082db2451ed27c5e733.jpg
3cac7430f164128f038e116497bb8662.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Hook 'Em 1
  • Drool 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Came back from Italy with 8 bottles of wine... nothing mind-bottilng or expensive per se but all from small wineries in Romagna so wines that would be hard to find here.  Lots of good Rebola, Sangiovese, Famoso and other local wines being made in the hills in the province of Rimini plus we also stopped by a couple in the hills outside of Castel Bolognese.  

A sample of some of the wineries we visited...

https://en.aziendalacasetta.it/ 

https://vinidellangelo.it/

https://www.sangiovesa.it/lazienda-agricola/

Also have gotten to know this winemaker https://www.santaluciavinery.it/ and we had a long conversation with some of the great wines from https://www.instagram.com/agricolaimuretti/?hl=it

We also had a chance to go to a local wine festival where tasting were 3 Euro a taste but each taste was basically a glass of wine.  There were 26 wineries and each one would have 3-5 wines available to try.  This was the fourth year we had attended the event and it keeps growing.

https://www.romagnaatavola.it/it/eventi/p-assaggi-di-vino-rimini-ponte-di-tiberio/

 

  • Hook 'Em 1
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

‘99 Clos Saron cab imo. Actually Renaissance vineyards, but the winemaker escaped the cult and kept some barrels. Prob slightly past peak but an opportunity to taste California history for less than $80. 
CBDBD837-F713-4475-81F0-6ED34A64C66B.thumb.jpeg.38fb9fc2b0e37f8a49aa51a3b87d1a4a.jpegD0FF149B-C875-42F8-9FDA-2C6983FF476A.thumb.jpeg.7c7fa49fd319e08cc0c63e805c7ce193.jpeg

Edited by We’reTexas
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/5/2022 at 5:40 PM, HenryJames said:

f Robert Parker

That’s a little harsh.  I’m not a fan of big California cab fruit bombs either, but before Parker there was a ton of shitty thin acidic wine out there.  The quality of wine around the world generally improved because of Parker.  I mostly drink Bordeaux and until he retired I could select a 90-92 point red Bordeaux in the $30 range (and there were several and some were even cheaper) and pretty much be guaranteed a good experience.  Same for southern Rhone.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, HouTex said:

That’s a little harsh.  I’m not a fan of big California cab fruit bombs either, but before Parker there was a ton of shitty thin acidic wine out there.  The quality of wine around the world generally improved because of Parker.  I mostly drink Bordeaux and until he retired I could select a 90-92 point red Bordeaux in the $30 range (and there were several and some were even cheaper) and pretty much be guaranteed a good experience.  Same for southern Rhone.

I mean, he did a lot of damage to wine. The point system certainly helped consumers but was bad in the long run. LOL at decent Bordeaux under $50 these days because of it. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, We’reTexas said:

I mean, he did a lot of damage to wine. The point system certainly helped consumers but was bad in the long run. LOL at decent Bordeaux under $50 these days because of it. 

Disagree.  And there are many, many excellent Bordeaux for under $50.   You probably know of it, but search Jeff Leve’s site winecellarinsider.com and you’ll find them. Just get away from the notion that you have to have a classified wine to enjoy it.  There are oceans of excellent Bordeaux, especially in good years—and most of the recent available vintages have been very good to great.  On the whole, Bordeaux is a better bargain than California cabs/merlots.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robert Parker bears a lot of responsibility for the oaked-up, jammy, high-alcohol nonsense that point-chasers salivated after and that frequently displaced more traditional wines.  Thankfully there's been a move back to more restrained wines in the last decade plus, and many producers who went overboard on the RP train are coming back to earth, in part, I'm sure, because there's a growing market for more restrained wines.  As someone who drinks a lot of Burgundy, N. Rhone, and Piedmont, this is a welcome development.  I don't think his influence was all bad, but I do think there's a lot of bad wine out there today that's the equivalent of the pre-RP thin and shrilly stuff, only now it's amped up with oak staves (or worse), mega purple, RS, high alcohol, etc.  All that said, there's probably never been a better time to drink wine than now.  And I actually subscribed to the Wine Advocate again recently, for the first time in 20+ years, because of William Kelley's coverage of Burgundy and, to a lesser extent, Bordeaux.

  • Hook 'Em 2
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No picture but I just had a 2018 CDP Domaine Du Pegau Reservee and it was one of the best wines I’ve had in the last several years.  Many people might say this was an over the top fruit bomb.  They would be wrong.  Leve gave it 95 points and I would agree.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/24/2022 at 8:30 AM, creeper said:

Robert Parker bears a lot of responsibility for the oaked-up, jammy, high-alcohol nonsense that point-chasers salivated after and that frequently displaced more traditional wines.  Thankfully there's been a move back to more restrained wines in the last decade plus, and many producers who went overboard on the RP train are coming back to earth, in part, I'm sure, because there's a growing market for more restrained wines.  As someone who drinks a lot of Burgundy, N. Rhone, and Piedmont, this is a welcome development.  I don't think his influence was all bad, but I do think there's a lot of bad wine out there today that's the equivalent of the pre-RP thin and shrilly stuff, only now it's amped up with oak staves (or worse), mega purple, RS, high alcohol, etc.  All that said, there's probably never been a better time to drink wine than now.  And I actually subscribed to the Wine Advocate again recently, for the first time in 20+ years, because of William Kelley's coverage of Burgundy and, to a lesser extent, Bordeaux.

Thank you!  I agree with this... honestly can't stand the bulk of what most people like to drink in the US and your description of oaked-up, jammy, high-alcohol nonsense is on the nose... not to mention that most of that crap gives me a headache.  Never get a headache drinking Italian wine and with those California bombs, it's a 50/50 proposition that I'm going to feel like garbage.

On an unrelated note, can I use a civil war bayonet to open a bottle of bubbles or will I end up with shrapnel, just like the olden days?

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, texasdago said:

Thank you!  I agree with this... honestly can't stand the bulk of what most people like to drink in the US and your description of oaked-up, jammy, high-alcohol nonsense is on the nose... not to mention that most of that crap gives me a headache.  Never get a headache drinking Italian wine and with those California bombs, it's a 50/50 proposition that I'm going to feel like garbage.

On an unrelated note, can I use a civil war bayonet to open a bottle of bubbles or will I end up with shrapnel, just like the olden days?

Well, imo California is the most exciting place in wine right with its new wave of young producers who are basically anti-Parker. 
 

You can use about anything to saber - I’ve used an iPhone. Just need a blunt edge. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

 

11 minutes ago, We’reTexas said:

Well, imo California is the most exciting place in wine right with its new wave of young producers who are basically anti-Parker. 

Who do you like?

Edited by HenryJames
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, We’reTexas said:

Well, imo California is the most exciting place in wine right with its new wave of young producers who are basically anti-Parker. 
 

You can use about anything to saber - I’ve used an iPhone. Just need a blunt edge. 

Even in Italy which is traditionally very change-averse we came across producers getting much more creative and doubling-down on grape varieties that usually get no love.  

An example of grapes that have made great wines that we've enjoyed...  http://www.artecibo.com/il-vitigno-famoso and https://www.italianowine.com/en/varieties/nosiola/

Also lots of producers making metodo ancestrale wines... aka pet nat.  One producer I talked to made it very clear... wine like our nonno used to make.  At one point the industry saw that wine as flawed but now they understand the value behind it. 

Like growers in Texas who are now experimenting with grapes like Teroldego (which is a niche grape in Italy).  Lots of interesting stuff.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, HenryJames said:

 

Who do you like?

My two favorite producers are Martha Stoumen, who I think makes extremely expressive but fun wines primarily sourced from Mendo, and Dani Rozman, who under his current project La Onda is doing incredible stuff in North Yuba with cab and Syrah. Frenchtown Farms, also in North Yuba, is doing incredible stuff up there as well, which is impressive considering how hard it is to farm there. They work with Gideon Beinstock, of Renaissance fame and currently making wine under the Clos Saron label. 
 

Others include Jolie Laide (they sort operate with Martha out of Pax Mahle’s winery in Sebastopol, which has begun producing excellent Northern Rhône-style syrah in its own right), Stagiare, Minus Tide, Les Lunes, Stirm (great Riesling), Dunites (syrah), Augur (syrah), Idlewild (Italian varietals), Scar of the Sea, and Emme Wines. 
 

They are all sort of the American reaction to the French glou glou scene, but much more balanced. Others have been around for a while of course, like Broc and Michael Cruse, but these shops have all gotten started up within the past five years or so. 
 

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

40 minutes ago, texasdago said:

Even in Italy which is traditionally very change-averse we came across producers getting much more creative and doubling-down on grape varieties that usually get no love.  

An example of grapes that have made great wines that we've enjoyed...  http://www.artecibo.com/il-vitigno-famoso and https://www.italianowine.com/en/varieties/nosiola/

Also lots of producers making metodo ancestrale wines... aka pet nat.  One producer I talked to made it very clear... wine like our nonno used to make.  At one point the industry saw that wine as flawed but now they understand the value behind it. 

Like growers in Texas who are now experimenting with grapes like Teroldego (which is a niche grape in Italy).  Lots of interesting stuff.   

One of the great things about the Italian wine scene is that natural winemaking techniques and indigenous varietals have always been around. COS, Arpepe, etc are legends and still influential today. 
 

I don’t really focus on grapes, but Pelaverga has become a hot varietal among the somm set as a grape very expressive of Piedmont but for good value. Look for Burlotto, Scarpa and Verduno. 

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, We’reTexas said:

One of the great things about the Italian wine scene is that natural winemaking techniques and indigenous varietals have always been around. COS, Arpepe, etc are legends and still influential today. 
 

I don’t really focus on grapes, but Pelaverga has become a hot varietal among the somm set as a grape very expressive of Piedmont but for good value. Look for Burlotto, Scarpa and Verduno. 

Texas' Burlotto importer got their drop last week, so for those who want to check out his Pelaverga, now's the time...

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

La Onda, IMO. Have had three bottles of this and Dani’s cab/Syrah blend is the most memorable wine I’ve had this year. Epic for only 13%.

7C27636A-9C01-4BDB-A7CA-8C7D111001A0.thumb.jpeg.5f887f3918c22687c936f36d08ae930c.jpeg

Sky, old school mountain zin.

D87D6195-3D52-4134-9955-C4F27644C6EE.thumb.jpeg.7c18347075c6c19b9b66fd6319cc3cbb.jpeg

Grower champagne, imo.

87118732-0C80-4E02-A5F5-DA757735D3DC.thumb.jpeg.551b71fcb51d5986404f7b20244c1c57.jpeg

Edited by We’reTexas
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, milkman said:

db8e95b1029d055a5e826d8ce1b6778e.jpg

Man, that's pretty special.  I hope your guests appreciated those.

Noticed the corks look a little worse for wear; wines holding up ok?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They are known to overfill their bottles so these corks are pretty normal. The Leroy wines were great but there were some crazy great wines opened that night! I'm sure I'm leaving some out...

f0685aa03cafa0b2425b62ea10cfa9fd.jpg

1961, 1982, 1989, 1990 Lynch Bages
1990 Angelus
1988 Certan de May
1990, 1993 Dom Perignon
1999 Salon
2002 Pol Roger Winstan Churchill
1995 Mouton Rothschild
1995 Haut Brion
1995 Leoville Las Cases
1994 Diamond Creek Red Rock
2012 PYCM Corton Charlemagne
2009 Konsgaard

  • Drool 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Man, that's pretty special.  I hope your guests appreciated those.
Noticed the corks look a little worse for wear; wines holding up ok?

This was a tasting put together by a small group. We sourced the wines from a collector willing to part with them for far less than market value.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can I has his digits, please?  Lol


So I want to put together a vertical tasting with some friends this fall.   Everyone will put in a set amount of money then the wine gets sourced.  I’d like the budget to be up to $1k for the tasting but I may get pushback on that.  The tasting will be for 5-6 people.  

I’m looking for suggestions.  It’s definitely a red wine tasting.  My tastes run to the classic Italian wines but I’m starting to learn (and greatly enjoying) French wines.   While I like California wines they aren’t my favorite but I am also not a fan of fruit bombs though I understand that phase may thankfully be petering out. 
 

Thanks for any and all suggestions.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can I has his digits, please?  Lol

So I want to put together a vertical tasting with some friends this fall.   Everyone will put in a set amount of money then the wine gets sourced.  I’d like the budget to be up to $1k for the tasting but I may get pushback on that.  The tasting will be for 5-6 people.  

I’m looking for suggestions.  It’s definitely a red wine tasting.  My tastes run to the classic Italian wines but I’m starting to learn (and greatly enjoying) French wines.   While I like California wines they aren’t my favorite but I am also not a fan of fruit bombs though I understand that phase may thankfully be petering out. 
 
Thanks for any and all suggestions.  

Depending on what sort of vertical you are wanting you might want to up your budget.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...