Jump to content
wild_turkey

Fort Worth is exploding

Recommended Posts

BI location? Good thing for them is their parking lot can be attributed to a few other places. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any of you been on Horne lately? Didn’t know they flattened the old rec center, but the new one looks nice as fucking shit if you’re heading south back towards Vickery. That shit had to cost some coin. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ss13 said:

BI location? Good thing for them is their parking lot can be attributed to a few other places. 

yes BI. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With escalating beef prices, I was surprised to see prime Top Sirloin on sale for $9.99 a pound at Central Market Friday night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Fudbelty said:

Checking in safe from cock fighting sting

Thoughts and prayers to the eight dead roosters 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Dr Fear said:

 

Back in the 90's I heard Joe Ely sing this at Caravan of Dreams multiple times-always greatness.  Jason does a good turn here as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who’s going to admit to attending? 

Quote

Hundreds of people crammed into a warehouse in downtown Fort Worth on Friday and Saturday night to celebrate a bar director’s birthday in spite of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. 

Corey Mobley said he decided to have a party for his 37th birthday at the last minute and invited hundreds of his friends to the secret location. The rain on Friday night kept some people away, so he decided to have a second round on Saturday.

“I was bored and there’s nothing else to do,” he said about the parties.

Mobley is the director of operations and founder of Whiskey Garden’s Turtle Races, an event usually held every other Monday in which an array of turtles race to a finish line. He plans and hosts parties for the bar and throws an annual birthday party, he said. Since the bars are closed, he decided to have the warehouse parties instead.

On Friday, 300 to 400 people filled the warehouse. On Saturday, hundreds more showed up. Mobley broke open a coronavirus-themed pinata filled with mini bottles of Rumple Minze, and photos show the crowd of people packed together to take a picture.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Who’s going to admit to attending? 
Hundreds of people crammed into a warehouse in downtown Fort Worth on Friday and Saturday night to celebrate a bar director’s birthday in spite of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. 
Corey Mobley said he decided to have a party for his 37th birthday at the last minute and invited hundreds of his friends to the secret location. The rain on Friday night kept some people away, so he decided to have a second round on Saturday.
“I was bored and there’s nothing else to do,” he said about the parties.
Mobley is the director of operations and founder of Whiskey Garden’s Turtle Races, an event usually held every other Monday in which an array of turtles race to a finish line. He plans and hosts parties for the bar and throws an annual birthday party, he said. Since the bars are closed, he decided to have the warehouse parties instead.
On Friday, 300 to 400 people filled the warehouse. On Saturday, hundreds more showed up. Mobley broke open a coronavirus-themed pinata filled with mini bottles of Rumple Minze, and photos show the crowd of people packed together to take a picture.
 
I've seen that guy around West 7th for years lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“Founder of Turtle Races” is funny. Chris Jordan didn’t call himself that way back in the day at Woody’s, & they certainly weren’t the first either. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damnit, Kane! 

Quote

Fred’s Texas Cafe has closed its landmark TCU-area location on Blue Bonnet Circle, co-owner Quincy Wallace said Wednesday.

Fred’s owners are “putting all our effort” into reopening the iconic burger restaurant’s Currie Street mothership, Wallace said. A third location, “Fred’s North” on Western Center Boulevard, already reopened.

Fred’s TCU opened in 2013, replacing a short-lived Love Shack that had filled the vacancy left by two old-time neighborhood hangouts, Caro’s Restaurant and the Oui Lounge. Caro’s also operated briefly as Dos Juans.

Bluebonnet Circle, a frequent hangout for Horned Frogs football fans, underwent street construction and parking changes. But business was still good before the coronavirus recession.

A German restaurant, Greenwood’s, had already closed nearby before the recession. A former college bar and hangout, The Bottom, has converted to the Purple Frog restaurant and grill.

TCU-area restaurants are facing a slow summer and fall with fewer students in school and football attendance potentially limited.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clearly not the main take away of the article but was Dos Juan's really Caros under a new name? The time I ate in there they swore they weren't. But I assumed after John ran everyone off, they changed the name as a last ditch effort to save the place. Damn I miss Caros.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What kind of food was Caro’s? There was a seafood place on Bluebonnet that was good for awhile, not Rockfish but a similar name. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Caro's was Mexican food. Pretty old school and didn't taste like anything else in town that I know of (if anybody knows of anything similar, please do tell). They had puffy tacos, bizarrely incredible nacho cheese, and the puffy tostadas and hot sauce were like crack. I know it wasn't everyone's cup of tea, but I grew up on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally made it by Derek Allens yesterday, just got some brisket, thought it was great, except the b a rk had zero flavor. It was like they ran out of pepper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems like a lot of effort to end up right back where you started. 

Quote

Last seen leaving on a flatbed trailer, Salsa Limón Museo is about to make a jubilant return to the Cultural District.

A flashy new Salsa will open as early as next week at 925 University Drive, in a mixed-use project on the site of the old Salsa chrome diner.

When last seen in 2016, the old Salsa Museo was loaded onto a trailer and left northbound. It made a short trip to its new home as Salsa Limón Rio, in the River District at 5012 White Settlement Road.

The new Museo is inside a Crockett Row project. Technically, it’s one door north of the old Salsa location.

Salsa founder Milo Ramirez describes Museo as “super modern” with a giant bar (folks, stay 6 feet apart for now) and a great view of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth.

There’s also an art piece, “Mesa Infinita,” that pays tribute to the Martin Puryear “Ladder for Booker T. Washington” at the museum.

The working menu is broader than other Salsa locations, with “eco” veggie and vegan tacos, burritos, bowls and quesadillas ($2.50-$6.50) or the familiar fillings like chicken, chorizo, bacon, asada, pastor or barbacoa ($3.50-$9).

It’s the first prominent opening in Crockett Row since the coronavirus pandemic began fluctuating.

“Salsa Limón has a huge following of hard-core fanatics that come to us for soulful Mexican food,” Ramirez said.

“We are doing our best to weather COVID-19 with their support.”

Current Salsa locations are open for breakfast, lunch and early dinner at 550 Throckmorton St., 1465 W. Magnolia Ave. and on White Settlement Road. A La Gran Plaza mall location has not reopened yet.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/20/2020 at 8:40 PM, TyphoonSe7en said:

Caro's was Mexican food. Pretty old school and didn't taste like anything else in town that I know of (if anybody knows of anything similar, please do tell). They had puffy tacos, bizarrely incredible nacho cheese, and the puffy tostadas and hot sauce were like crack. I know it wasn't everyone's cup of tea, but I grew up on it.

Good times back in the day when Johnny Day Whitten was running Caro's.  One stop shopping while getting your drink on at the Oui and having him bring you an order of puffy tacos to eat at the bar. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

God I miss those puffy tacos/tostadas, and their hot sauce... hell pretty much everything on the menu. They used to do pork chops with grilled pico... why in the hell doesn't anyone do puffy tacos up here?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

600 block of N. Sylvania. Hope he catches at least one charge just to have to deal with the headache. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/18/2020 at 8:57 PM, TornACL said:

Thoughts and prayers to the eight dead roosters 

The Colonel at KFC picked them up earlier

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

According to police, the male got into his own vehicle instead of his friend's. The man drove down the street and attempted to run over some of the bar staff standing outside of the bar, police said.

Police said the man drove over the curb and hit several objects before turning around and attempting to run over the bar staff again.

https://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/woman-injured-hit-by-car-outside-fort-worth-bar-police-say/2376258/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At least we didn’t pull a Dallas. 

Quote

A party bus owner who was escorted out of an Uptown bar is accused of shooting to death a man outside of the bar, Dallas police said Monday.

After the shooting, Franklin Moore left the scene, but he later surrendered to Euless police.

Moore was in the Dallas County Jail on Monday and his bond had not been set.

Moore, 24, faces a charge of murder in the shooting, police said.

Dallas police responded to the shooting call at about 1:20 a.m. Monday near the One Sette in the 2600 block of McKinney Ave. in Dallas.

Officers found a man later identified as Tommie Richard Rodgers, 32, suffering from a gunshot wound to his chest in the 2500 block of Boll Street, just across the street from the bar.

Rodgers was taken to a hospital, where he died.

Dallas detectives learned that Moore had been involved in a disturbance in the bar with several patrons and escorted out.

Moore then grabbed a handgun out of a party bus that he owns, Dallas police said.

Moore re-entered the club and again was escorted out.

Once outside, Moore and Rodgers got into a confrontation that ended when Rodgers was shot multiple times.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, this was an ex-friend of mine 5 years ago. He was eventually re-hired & still works as a firefighter. 

Quote

A firefighter has been terminated over allegations that, while drunk, he tried to hit two employees of a west Fort Worth bar with his pickup after they refused him service and tried to prevent him from driving.

Jason Langford, who was arrested on charges of driving while intoxicated and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon in January, was indefinitely suspended effective Friday, according to a disciplinary letter obtained by the Star-Telegram.

The letter, signed by Fire Chief Rudy Jackson, acknowledges that Langford had no previous record of discipline and has since addressed some of the personal problems that led to the incident.

But it states, “this department cannot and will not retain an employee that is believed to have purposely and knowingly attempted to intimidate, maim or kill good Samaritans whose only goal was to protect him and others.”

Langford, 37, who has been with the department for over nine years, will appeal his firing, said his attorney, Jim Lane.

Lane said a plea deal with prosecutors in the criminal case is in the works.

“We have worked out an agreement with the district attorney’s office, but we’ve not pled it so I’m not going to disclose what it is,” Lane said.

The disciplinary letter indicates that, as part of the plea deal, Langford intends to plead guilty to DWI and deadly conduct, both misdemeanor charges.

A disclosure filed by prosecutors in March and included in Langford’s criminal case file indicates that James Pendleton, one of three alleged victims listed in the police report, told prosecutors that while Langford was very intoxicated that night, he doesn’t believe the firefighter was intentionally trying to hit him or other staff.

Pendleton told the prosecutor that he believes Langford did what he did “more out of panic than anything else” and that he wasn’t “sure he even saw us.”

He also said he had plenty of time to move out of Langford’s way, the disclosure notice states.

Langford is charged with two counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon in connection with two of the bar employees. Pendleton is not among the alleged victims, court records show.

REFUSED DRINKS

Langford was placed on restricted duty after his arrest due to the “serious nature of the charges,” the disciplinary letter says.

In a written statement to the department’s Office of Professional Standards, which conducts internal investigations of such matters, Langford admitted he had been drinking throughout the day at home and went alone to the Landmark Bar at 3008 Bledsoe St.

He wrote that after a few drinks there, he was declined further drinks by the bar and walked to the nearby Magnolia Motor Lounge at 3005 Morton St.

Video footage inside the lounge shows Langford staggering and sitting at the bar.

Though Langford told internal investigators he was not given a drink at the bar, the video showed that he requested and was given a beer.

“Within minutes of receiving the beer, employees of the Magnolia Motor Lounge surmised that Firefighter Langford was heavily intoxicated and decided to both cut him off from further drinks and take away the drink he had been given earlier,” the letter states.

Both the video and witness statements showed Langford became upset that he was cut off and began to curse and berate the bartender, the letter states.

Staff members offered to call Langford a taxi, but he declined. He also declined their requests that he give them his keys, the letter stated, prompting staff to call for police.

‘HE TRIED TO RUN US OVER’

According to the letter, Langford followed a staff member when the employee walked outside to call 911. In a recording of that 911 call, investigators could hear staff pleading with Langford to give over his keys.

“I’m following you to make sure you don’t get in your car, sir — you’re intoxicated,” a staff member could be heard saying.

The staff member then told the 911 dispatcher, “Oh, he’s coming after me right now.” Investigators believe that an angry Langford had made an “aggressive move” toward the employees trying to stop him.

The letter states that despite their efforts, Langford got in and started his Toyota pickup. Video surveillance then showed him making a deliberate turn to the right toward the staff members who had been trying to stop him.

“When asked, the lounge staff clearly stated and truly believes that Firefighter Langford intended to run them over with his Toyota truck,” the letter states. “On 911 call audio, one can clearly hear the staff comment, ‘He’s threatening us with his vehicle. He tried to run us over.’”

The letter states Langford then came to a quick stop, backed his pickup up, and parked for about 20 seconds before driving out of the parking area.

According to a Fort Worth police report, an officer responding to the call spotted the pickup on University Drive and conducted a “high-risk” traffic stop of the truck.

The report states Langford told the officer that he had had only three beers and refused to consent to a breath or blood test. A search warrant was then obtained for a sample of his blood, the report states.

Blood tests later revealed Langford had a blood alcohol level of 0.205 — more than two and a half times the legal limit of 0.08.

ALLEGED UNTRUTHFULNESS

In the letter, investigators also accused Langford of being untruthful during the internal investigation.

In a March 26 interview with department officials, the letter states, Langford was “very vague” regarding details of that night and had trouble recalling some of the events, the disciplinary letter states.

When Assistant Chief David Coble told Langford that investigators had obtained video of that night and offered Langford the chance to tell the truth concerning his actions that evening, Langford declined to change his statement.

“To the best of my recollections, that’s how I remember the incident,” he allegedly said, according to the letter.

“While Firefighter Langford readily admits to being heavily intoxicated on said evening, his versions of events do not match obtained evidence and witness statements,” the letter states. “Ultimately, I believe that Firefighter Langford lied during this investigation to cover up his true actions on said evening.”

 

If you’re ever a cop or firefighter in trouble in this city, you call Jim Lane. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Roy Pope Grocery, an old-time neighborhood supermarket, meat market and burger grill serving west Fort Worth since World War II, will reopen under a partnership led by chef Louis Lambert, he said Thursday.

The grocery, 2300 Merrick St., is under contract to Lambert and investors Mark Harris and Rodger Chieffalo, Lambert said.

The butcher shop and market “will finally get the update and facelift that it needed,” owner Bob Larance said in an email.

“It will truly be a neighborhood store.”

Lambert, co-founder of Dutch’s Hamburgers and owner of Austin restaurants, said “We want to embrace the history of service and everything that made Roy Pope special.

The specialty grocery will enlarge the kitchen, expand the deli and add indoor and outdoor seating for a neighorhood wine bar, he said.

He compared it to the Royal Blue urban markets in Austin — “small and with the fresh meats Roy Pope was known for.”

Lambert, an experienced restaurateur, is known for Lambert’s, Jo’s Coffee and Lou’s Bodega in Austin along with Dutch’s Hamburgers and a former Lambert’s in Fort Worth.

“Living in New York and San Francisco, I loved little neighborhood markets — there’s something romantic about it all,” he said.

In Fort Worth, he’s shopped every few weeks at Roy Pope.

“I would always think — wow, this place would be so cool,” he said.

Bob and Renee Larance closed the supermarket in March just as coronavirus restrictions began, but Bob Larance said they had already been planning to sell it.

In a month when supermarkets nationwide did record business, customers rushed to Roy Pope’s closeout sale to beat the superstore lines for meat, produce and paper goods.

“But one week doesn’t solve years of problems,” Larance said then.

When the grocery opened, it was a partnership between Pope and another grocer, Charles Kincaid.

In 1946, Pope and Kincaid split in a disagreement. Kincaid opened his own grocery three blocks east. It went on to become today’s Kincaid’s Hamburgers.

Over the years, Kincaid’s updated the store and eventually became a hamburger restaurant. But Roy Pope Grocery kept the original grocery layout with narrow aisles, cluttered shelves and a full-service meat market where diners could pick up a cheeseburger or some of the west side’s best fried chicken.

 

Lambert was just on an episode of ‘Man Fire Food’ last night. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...