Jump to content
Walden Ponderer

2020 Gardening: digging up some new dirt on an old hobby

Recommended Posts

12 hours ago, Mrs Whiggins said:

If you need a little time to perhaps see about delivery instead of going out, maybe read this article and see if it would be pertinent for you. It has some advice for if you need to delay planting for awhile including longer than ten days.

https://www.starkbros.com/growing-guide/article/how-to-delay-planting

Nice thought, but these were bare root trees, so they pretty much had to go in the ground today. Local feed lot is offering "order on line, drive up, we put it in your truck" service, so I never had to even roll down the window when I went out. Probably a good thing, too. I planted roughly twenty trees, came inside, took my temp, it was an even 101°. No respiratory symptoms, but still, I am glad to be done planting for a few days. I may not have Covid-19, but I have something, and it sucks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I has a question, looking for some experienced guidance. Wife bought a cheap greenhouse kit, 6x8 footprint, thin plastic panels. Now that I have it and started scanning the assembly instructions, I see that part of the structural integrity comes from the base being secured to the floor we put it on.  Driving stakes into bare earth is one choice, but since we plan on using layered grow boxes inside, I was thinking a build a wooden floor for it and screw the frame into that. 
so, boxed 2x4s with another or 2 down the middle, and plywood top? That simple?  Or should I have 4x4s on the outside, and open ended more like a large pallet so it’s easier to level?

is there treated plywood that would be ok in the elements, including snow on it for weeks at a time?  Or would some sort of deck build be better?

Edited by Pato del Muerto

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Finished up the top trim on the raised beds and got both started with vegetables/herbs. Also started to make three tapered planters for container growing some citrus trees.4baa4f8cfdabf75952ddd95050759cf6.jpg7298a5eddad7a7bfbc11045c3e05fa82.jpgd0fa36d6a411c1677499203ceb3bb9da.jpg29fabeab0cb1b18d259dedaec096327f.jpg
Well even if your veggies go to shit, you still win the internets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even with it being a turd floater, I have to get the extension onto the raised bed done. Bought a bunch of plants yesterday that can sit around a couple days till I get time to get them on the soil. Only have this afternoon of some free time for prep before back to the grind tomorrow. 87d5d2c8d5129dfe8e54c7344a79c7bf.jpgcdaa2af021e25eff0212ef24b3ac9770.jpg68d1903124443049811daed2e3d66fef.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Walden Ponderer said:

Nice thought, but these were bare root trees, so they pretty much had to go in the ground today. Local feed lot is offering "order on line, drive up, we put it in your truck" service, so I never had to even roll down the window when I went out. Probably a good thing, too. I planted roughly twenty trees, came inside, took my temp, it was an even 101°. No respiratory symptoms, but still, I am glad to be done planting for a few days. I may not have Covid-19, but I have something, and it sucks.

I hope you feel better soon, but don't overdo the exertion for sure.

8 minutes ago, Both Tacos said:

Even with it being a turd floater, I have to get the extension onto the raised bed done. Bought a bunch of plants yesterday that can sit around a couple days till I get time to get them on the soil. Only have this afternoon of some free time for prep before back to the grind tomorrow. 87d5d2c8d5129dfe8e54c7344a79c7bf.jpgcdaa2af021e25eff0212ef24b3ac9770.jpg68d1903124443049811daed2e3d66fef.jpg

I have garden space jealousy here. That is a nice setup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been a process over time to get it that big (that's what she said).

What I'm going to like is I can spread out the plants and not getting hung up on cages or two plants growing into one another. It also gives me the room to grow cantaloupes and melons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My neighbor has a cattle panel trellis where they bent it in a gentle arch and secured it to four metal T posts. They grow small melons/squash on it. Their backyard has a lot of play equipment for their children so they maximized their space. Your ability to spread out like you said is a big plus.

The rain has been a blessing, but I am looking forward to putting in some more seeds this week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/22/2020 at 2:13 PM, Pato del Muerto said:

I has a question, looking for some experienced guidance. Wife bought a cheap greenhouse kit, 6x8 footprint, thin plastic panels. Now that I have it and started scanning the assembly instructions, I see that part of the structural integrity comes from the base being secured to the floor we put it on.  Driving stakes into bare earth is one choice, but since we plan on using layered grow boxes inside, I was thinking a build a wooden floor for it and screw the frame into that. 
so, boxed 2x4s with another or 2 down the middle, and plywood top? That simple?  Or should I have 4x4s on the outside, and open ended more like a large pallet so it’s easier to level?

is there treated plywood that would be ok in the elements, including snow on it for weeks at a time?  Or would some sort of deck build be better?

You know what you can't fuck up?

Cut stone. I built my garden years ago and it looks the same today

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I has a question, looking for some experienced guidance. Wife bought a cheap greenhouse kit, 6x8 footprint, thin plastic panels. Now that I have it and started scanning the assembly instructions, I see that part of the structural integrity comes from the base being secured to the floor we put it on.  Driving stakes into bare earth is one choice, but since we plan on using layered grow boxes inside, I was thinking a build a wooden floor for it and screw the frame into that. 
so, boxed 2x4s with another or 2 down the middle, and plywood top? That simple?  Or should I have 4x4s on the outside, and open ended more like a large pallet so it’s easier to level?
is there treated plywood that would be ok in the elements, including snow on it for weeks at a time?  Or would some sort of deck build be better?
My guess would be to get whatever structure you are planing to secure the sides to off the ground. Treated lumber will last for a couple years I would imagine, but any wood in contact with the bare earth will eventually succumb Mother Nature more quickly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My neighbor has a cattle panel trellis where they bent it in a gentle arch and secured it to four metal T posts. They grow small melons/squash on it. Their backyard has a lot of play equipment for their children so they maximized their space. Your ability to spread out like you said is a big plus.
The rain has been a blessing, but I am looking forward to putting in some more seeds this week.
I do the same thing with 16 ft cattle panels to grow cucumbers and green beans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Irwin F Fletcher said:
On 3/22/2020 at 3:13 PM, Pato del Muerto said:
I has a question, looking for some experienced guidance. ...is there treated plywood that would be ok in the elements, including snow on it for weeks at a time?  Or would some sort of deck build be better?

My guess would be to get whatever structure you are planing to secure the sides to off the ground. Treated lumber will last for a couple years I would imagine, but any wood in contact with the bare earth will eventually succumb Mother Nature more quickly.

Some of us take advantage of that, actually. It's called "huglekultur", and it has a ton of benefits, not the least of which is, it's easier than hauling off scrap wood from when you prune, trim, clear, etc. Here's a good primer on the subject, though it's really pretty straightforward. Just build a mound of old scrap wood, make layers of logs, trimmings, leaves, compost, etc., and as each layer rots, you get a new planting surface. You can cheat the first year by adding topsoil directly to the top of your mound in the area you want to plant, but a good huglekultur mound can last for a decade or more before you have to move on to the next pile of rotting wood on your property. Or, you can cheat again, by adding more compost to your existing hill.

 

diagram-of-a-hugelkultur-bed-678x381.jpg

 

 

Edited by Walden Ponderer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally harvested a couple of strawberries this weekend. It was my first attempt at growing them. My contraption to keep the critters away is homely but did the job. Planted some garlic bulbs a little late, but it is an experiment so we'll see what happens. The peas have some blossoms and the bees have been buzzing around due to the other flowers. I really enjoy having some veggies sprinkled in among the flowers. It is more stressful as I worry over crops more than I do blooms, but given the shelter in place going on, gives me a different outlet for the worry I suppose! My next door neighbor thinks I'm turning into a female version of Elmer Fudd based on my squirrel comments. Not wrong. He was digging around my seedlings and ruined a bunch of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I got my plants into the topsy turvy's this weekend. 2 Japs and 1 cherry tomato. I may have murdered the tomato plant upon transfer though. If you ever decide to try one of these, make sure you (GENTLY) put them through the hole plant first, despite what the instructions say. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That’s a shitload of work and materials only to have Mother Nature and gravity fuck it up in 5 years or less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, 4th and 5 said:

That’s a shitload of work and materials only to have Mother Nature and gravity fuck it up in 5 years or less.

No shit. I don't understand the enclosure idea, anyway. I plant out in the open, following my grandma's advice, planting three times what I want: one third for me, one third that fails, and one third for varmints.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I typically don't go for ornamentals -- I mean, why plant something that's just pretty, when fruit trees are pretty and productive? But this piece of property has things growing on it that I never would have put there on my own, and now that they are blooming, I'm glad to see them. Saucer Magnolias, Bradford Pear, Wisteria, and a bunch of stuff I don't even recognize, and they are all over the place.

91180314_10219739555213843_1797485560458117120_n.jpg?_nc_cat=101&_nc_sid=110474&_nc_ohc=6Qk0d6_40YoAX8Uhqfp&_nc_ht=scontent.fiad1-1.fna&oh=12569e0eb4babd095099c91e362552be&oe=5EAAF1A591646016_10219781524543050_6144750332464332800_n.jpg?_nc_cat=102&_nc_sid=110474&_nc_ohc=OsxD4B6z9uEAX9lJ4F5&_nc_ht=scontent.fiad1-1.fna&oh=c47ffec7f226f28ef42976566945d198&oe=5EA7B539Image may contain: plant, tree, flower, outdoor and nature91570094_10219781534583301_7994670683328086016_n.jpg?_nc_cat=107&_nc_sid=110474&_nc_ohc=AbeNj8cRIIgAX-30icN&_nc_ht=scontent.fiad1-1.fna&oh=fc88fd25c5c491eeace938ea397cba7b&oe=5EA8498D91542308_10219781535543325_1543313600653819904_n.jpg?_nc_cat=101&_nc_sid=110474&_nc_ohc=XP3lhMqFkVMAX_OFLrI&_nc_ht=scontent.fiad1-1.fna&oh=de9ee9d547709b3f4206575da2eca809&oe=5EA95E5491706348_10219781538463398_1970414408517550080_n.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_sid=110474&_nc_ohc=jm3ybNPzpAMAX9hHX58&_nc_ht=scontent.fiad1-1.fna&oh=541a178de13dbaf0cbc2fd211a185495&oe=5EAA92C2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

X-posting on landscaping thread...

I have what I guess you could call an ornamental garden in the backyard.  It has knockout rose, mountain laurel, purple lantana, lily of the nile, plumbago, mexican bush sage, Esperanza, texas sage, red bud, weeping red bud, red yucca, pink skull cap, purple heart, indian hawthorne, artichoke agave, turks cap, loropetalum, soft leaf yucca, variegated ginger, abulia, liziope, oak leaf hydrangea, beauty berry, and black & blue salvia, and flax lily.  80% of these were installed in Nov 2019, and the remaining 20% is going to go in over the next 60 days.

Unfortunately I also have the dreaded NUTSEDGE coming up in the mulch.  Nutsedge laughs at Roundup and Glyphosphate.  Manual pulling makes it worse.

In the past I've used an Image/44% Glophosphate mix to kill it but I literally had to paint it onto the shoots.  That's no longer feasible here.

I have some SedgeHammer (halosalfuron) and a container of Dismiss (sulfentrazone) and I'd like to do a spot spray in the areas that have trouble, but I'm finding conflicting info on if that is OK in my landscape garden.  The Sulfentrazone label says not to use it in ornamental areas, but there are lots of threads online where it's fine.  SedgeHammer says its OK but apparently doesn't work as well as the Dismiss.  Apparently the Dismiss persists in soil for a year, whereas the SedgeHammer is much shorter.  I'm wondering if when they install the new stuff in the next month or two if that's going to interfere with the transplant process if I spray now.

Anyone have any thoughts/ideas?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@cactusflinthead would be the guy to ask pertinent chemical questions of; as you can undoubtedly tell, I don't even bother with weed control. We pull weeds and feed 'em to the chickens, so it just isn't relevant for us.

Nutsedge used to drive me insane before I started raising chickens.  Giving up that fight has lowered my blood pressure. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Walden Ponderer said:

@cactusflinthead would be the guy to ask pertinent chemical questions of; as you can undoubtedly tell, I don't even bother with weed control. We pull weeds and feed 'em to the chickens, so it just isn't relevant for us.

Nutsedge used to drive me insane before I started raising chickens.  Giving up that fight has lowered my blood pressure. 

When I worked at Fossil Rim I'd bring nutgrass plugs to the prairie chicken pens. It was one of their favorites. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is probably a "no duh, dumbass" type of statement, but this year I mixed a bunch of perlite with my soil because I felt like my plants weren't getting enough drainage before and damn I can already tell a difference. Just about every plant I put out about 10 days ago has doubled in size. Took a month to do that in previous years. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/31/2020 at 5:37 PM, Walden Ponderer said:

I typically don't go for ornamentals -- I mean, why plant something that's just pretty, when fruit trees are pretty and productive? But this piece of property has things growing on it that I never would have put there on my own, and now that they are blooming, I'm glad to see them. Saucer Magnolias, Bradford Pear, Wisteria, and a bunch of stuff I don't even recognize, and they are all over the place.

91180314_10219739555213843_1797485560458117120_n.jpg?_nc_cat=101&_nc_sid=110474&_nc_ohc=6Qk0d6_40YoAX8Uhqfp&_nc_ht=scontent.fiad1-1.fna&oh=12569e0eb4babd095099c91e362552be&oe=5EAAF1A591646016_10219781524543050_6144750332464332800_n.jpg?_nc_cat=102&_nc_sid=110474&_nc_ohc=OsxD4B6z9uEAX9lJ4F5&_nc_ht=scontent.fiad1-1.fna&oh=c47ffec7f226f28ef42976566945d198&oe=5EA7B539Image may contain: plant, tree, flower, outdoor and nature91570094_10219781534583301_7994670683328086016_n.jpg?_nc_cat=107&_nc_sid=110474&_nc_ohc=AbeNj8cRIIgAX-30icN&_nc_ht=scontent.fiad1-1.fna&oh=fc88fd25c5c491eeace938ea397cba7b&oe=5EA8498D91542308_10219781535543325_1543313600653819904_n.jpg?_nc_cat=101&_nc_sid=110474&_nc_ohc=XP3lhMqFkVMAX_OFLrI&_nc_ht=scontent.fiad1-1.fna&oh=de9ee9d547709b3f4206575da2eca809&oe=5EA95E5491706348_10219781538463398_1970414408517550080_n.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_sid=110474&_nc_ohc=jm3ybNPzpAMAX9hHX58&_nc_ht=scontent.fiad1-1.fna&oh=541a178de13dbaf0cbc2fd211a185495&oe=5EAA92C2

Nice azaleas/rhododendrons 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I harvested four strawberries today. Take that squirrel!! Something, however, is consuming the pea plant so I need to figure out what to douse it with that won't kill me before the COVID does. Should I start small like dish soap and then go nuclear with a real chemical? I saw no bugs so it could have been the squirrel again as I am pretty sure he has built a nest in our elm. We have no rabbits in our yard. The leaves were eaten and the top looked like it had been chewed on too.

I do so much better with flowers. I take the crop plants personally and get a little mean inside when something attacks them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No shit. I don't understand the enclosure idea, anyway. I plant out in the open, following my grandma's advice, planting three times what I want: one third for me, one third that fails, and one third for varmints.
To keep the deer out. You have deer around a garden, there is no "one third for varmits". It all gets eaten by the deer.
Luckily I don't have that issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do y'all do about rabbits?  I'm moving to a place with deer and rabbits.  I'm thinking of an enclosed area with deer fencing, with rabbit fencing for the lower part.  Maybe I'll get a feral cat.

 

Oh, I'll have bigass snails, too.  Like 1" diameter snails.  I'll have to set up some traps or something for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I harvested four strawberries today. Take that squirrel!! Something, however, is consuming the pea plant so I need to figure out what to douse it with that won't kill me before the COVID does. Should I start small like dish soap and then go nuclear with a real chemical? I saw no bugs so it could have been the squirrel again as I am pretty sure he has built a nest in our elm. We have no rabbits in our yard. The leaves were eaten and the top looked like it had been chewed on too.
I do so much better with flowers. I take the crop plants personally and get a little mean inside when something attacks them.

Strawberries already? I think mine haven’t really gotten a chance to but maybe not enough sun. I’ve got something eating the leaves on my bell peppers. I don’t think caterpillars so haven’t tried BT spray. Perhaps aphids... tomato plants starting to grow other than just getting beat by this rain.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ZB'Tejas said:


Strawberries already? I think mine haven’t really gotten a chance to but maybe not enough sun. I’ve got something eating the leaves on my bell peppers. I don’t think caterpillars so haven’t tried BT spray. Perhaps aphids... tomato plants starting to grow other than just getting beat by this rain.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

The strawberries are not very large, but I also kept them in a pot in an attempt to actually obtain one this year. That may have restricted the size, but I've had blooms since late last month. Of course, the bluebonnets were blooming then too so it's been freaky early this year.

I have two tomato plants and one has a bloom or two. So far, no caterpillars but I've seen the moths around so I should probably give them a shot of something. Peas have pods except for the one plant that is now sad due to its mauling by whatever gnawed on it. Dill, parsely, and basil are growing although the basil won't like this cool front so much. I got the garlic in late but it sprouted. It's an experiment so we'll see how it does. I'm planting the corn and eggplant when it dries out some.

Sunflowers are now about six inches tall and the milkweed that the early monarch caterpillars ate to nubs is now resprouting. Butterflies and bees are zooming when the sun is out. Almost got taken out by a bee to the face the other day. I wear a bright ball cap in the sun and it must have thought I was a flower. Oh! And a hummingbird too. Got one of the feeders up last week and he's been out and about.

The rain has been a blessing, but yes, everything is looking a little bedraggled right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, miguelito said:

What do y'all do about rabbits?  I'm moving to a place with deer and rabbits.  I'm thinking of an enclosed area with deer fencing, with rabbit fencing for the lower part.  Maybe I'll get a feral cat.

 

Oh, I'll have bigass snails, too.  Like 1" diameter snails.  I'll have to set up some traps or something for them.

Just have a Covid patient cough on some carrot sticks, and leave 'em right outside your garden. That'll teach the little buggers. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amateur question.  I would like to spread some turf builder, and I think I need to aerate before doing so.  My yards are not big, total lot size is 7k sq. feet.

A professional service quoted me $150.  I don't mind spending some money, but that just seems silly for my small yards.

This is the only tool with decent reviews on Amazon.  Would seem like a slow process, but fine to go this route if it's the best idea: Yard Butler Lawn Coring Aerator Manual Grass Dethatching Turf Plug Core Aeration Tool ID-6C

This would seem like the easiest/most efficient, but reviews are pretty terrible: Rolling Lawn Aerator 18-inch Garden Yard Rotary Push Tine Heavy Duty Spike Soil Aeration, 50-in Handle (Green w/Fender)

The aerator shoes are the last option, but have read these are not the best idea.

Any advice on the best option?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Amateur question.  I would like to spread some turf builder, and I think I need to aerate before doing so.  My yards are not big, total lot size is 7k sq. feet.
A professional service quoted me $150.  I don't mind spending some money, but that just seems silly for my small yards.
This is the only tool with decent reviews on Amazon.  Would seem like a slow process, but fine to go this route if it's the best idea: Yard Butler Lawn Coring Aerator Manual Grass Dethatching Turf Plug Core Aeration Tool ID-6C
This would seem like the easiest/most efficient, but reviews are pretty terrible: Rolling Lawn Aerator 18-inch Garden Yard Rotary Push Tine Heavy Duty Spike Soil Aeration, 50-in Handle (Green w/Fender)
The aerator shoes are the last option, but have read these are not the best idea.
Any advice on the best option?  
Excuse me sir, but the lawn and landscape post is 2 aisles over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...