Jump to content
Mojo Hand

Woodworking, DIY, and home repair thread

Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, NateHitch said:

Mentioned to the wife that I wanted to build a coffee table and she responded with something about wanting a vanity. So I guess I'm building a vanity. My only strategy now is to figure out a design that allows me to need as many new tools as necessary

Dude.  You obviously need a new shop to be able to build this vanity. Preferably with AC, 3phase power, and a built in car lift. Because reasons. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend of mine lives in and takes care of an old mansion owned by his uncle, who is never coming back, place is huge. Anyways, he asked.me.to.turn his basement into my own workshop. I have a lot of.cleaning and organizing ahead of me. In the end, I'll have my garage for.small projects and the basement for my bigger jobs.b04d6937067d96048994077e41572f0c.jpgd180dc7f13ed5b290c8125fb0fdb50a9.jpg605753f3f904856ceffe9e3ed5c7ee3a.jpg131865fd0372648baa8c36d0a2294eb1.jpg381df4a72bae9d9b850c13142d9aa107.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have that much room, I’d build a big table for my table saw. Have enough room to handle a full sheet of plywood with no worries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, drt said:

Dude.  You obviously need a new shop to be able to build this vanity. Preferably with AC, 3phase power, and a built in car lift. Because reasons. 

Listen to him... he's pre med

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you have that much room, I’d build a big table for my table saw. Have enough room to handle a full sheet of plywood with no worries.
That's the plan, one of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/22/2018 at 3:45 PM, Spur08 said:

Beginner trying to get into some woodworking here.  I've decided to make my first "big" project a desk for the wife.  I have a design and plan in mind and am shopping out the supplies.  First question, what is "common board" that you see in the specialty woods section of big box stores?  Also, what wood would you consider in making a (this) desk?


[Imgur](https://i.imgur.com/eLgzPTd.jpg)

https://imgur.com/eLgzPTd

 

Edit -- I have no idea how to do imgur on this thing.

So I’m mid-project on this piece.  I’ve gotten the 2 end pieces and the inner shelf piece made.  Questions I’ve encountered so far:

 

-          Knots – I’m using “prime” grade stubs for all the 2x4 construction.  Do I need to seal these knots before I prime and paint?  If so, what should I seal them with?

-          Table Top – I bought “common grade” 1x6 for the table top due to the cost and my experience.  I hear the recommendations on making the table top thicker to make it appear more aesthetic.  What option(s) do I have regarding making the top appear thicker?  Throw a sub-30” x 72” plywood base underneath it and then route a 2x2 trim piece on the end?  Would that work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm thinking about building a new grill table out of cedar. I've never worked with cedar before. I'd like to seal it to keep the color looking like new / natural. Any recommendations?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, TXLNGHRN10 said:

I'm thinking about building a new grill table out of cedar. I've never worked with cedar before. I'd like to seal it to keep the color looking like new / natural. Any recommendations?

Waterlox marine grade finishes would be a good place to start.  A marine type finish is kind of key for kitchen applications IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used Waterlox on black walnut a few times and it gives the wood an amber tint. This was on an indoor butcher block island and a table top. Both turned out really nice, but just be aware that it does have some tint.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Okie State said:

I've used Waterlox on black walnut a few times and it gives the wood an amber tint. This was on an indoor butcher block island and a table top. Both turned out really nice, but just be aware that it does have some tint.

Thanks, Is there a durable waterproof finish that's  that's 100% clear ?  Seems like it'a always a game of color vs. strength and the balance of the 2.  

An amber sheen on cedar sounds pretty amazing, but that's just personal preference.  Amber sheen was probably a 70's band name.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not really sure. Maybe a Spar Urethane? I think that's completely clear and provides UV protection. Not positive on it being waterproof, but I assume it is. The UV protection typically comes from the tint. For decking I really like ReadySeal in the Pecan color.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never used it, but I'd be worried about the weight and potential for cracking if you want to be able to move the table around. May be an option if it's stationary though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was on vacation all last week and didn’t post an update before I left:

Didn’t plan on having to touch the plumbing for the tub. Naturally the new tub drain didn’t match up the old tub drain. So since I was going to have to redo some of it I took out the old drum trap and put in a p trap.

5b740dc1d517bd8adfee760f7d735ffd.jpg

Also laid the tile floor.

702445cb2915cf6746736788595c00a3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. Overall happy with the floor. Didn’t dry fit 100% of the tile and found out too late that the last couple feet of the room is out of square by 1/4”. Ended up with a row of tile with a 1/16 gap instead of 1/8”. I wouldn’t care if it was more out of the way, but being right in the doorway bugs me. No one else that I’ve shown it too has noticed it, but for now it sticks out like a sore thumb to me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mid build on a farm table desk design for the wife. The frame looks grab but I'm having trouble with the top. I thought the lumber was square enough but l, after pocket hole and glue up, the whole piece has a cup and twist to it. Not sure what to do at this point d0902b1df05f0c6fb7f01227553c55fd.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use a jointer or bench planer if you can.  It'll be worth borrowing or renting one.  I built this table and bench for my sister as a housewarming gift.  Used #1 YP for everything.  I culled the lumber to find as straight of boards as possible and ran them all through the jointer / planer knocking 1/4" off the dimension and making sure everything was square.  Made a big difference in the levelness of the top when it was all said and done.

IMG_8159.jpg

Edited by Spaulding Smails

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm afraid I'm pot committed. I've already done the glue up on it. I was able to sand down the joints to be even but there are still peaks/valleys and there is still an overall cupping shape to the unit. Did I waste $100 in lumber? And, no, I do not have a planet or jointer. Anyone know if there is a place near 75078 i could go to have a 2.5'x 6' board planed?651765df180e5b2c3967f6214f52a5d7.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have a hand planer?  That may be worth a shot.  Not going to be perfect, but you may be able to feather it down some then hit it with an orbital sander.  

Otherwise, look at a hardwood lumber supplier that mills on site.  They may be able to run it through the planer for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Spaulding Smails said:

Use a jointer or bench planer if you can.  It'll be worth borrowing or renting one.  I built this table and bench for my sister as a housewarming gift.  Used #1 YP for everything.  I culled the lumber to find as straight of boards as possible and ran them all through the jointer / planer knocking 1/4" off the dimension and making sure everything was square.  Made a big difference in the levelness of the top when it was all said and done.

IMG_8159.jpg

That's a really beautiful, well-executed farmhouse table.  Congrats, I hope your sister appreciates it.   And the matching bench, of course!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Spur08 said:

I'm afraid I'm pot committed. I've already done the glue up on it. I was able to sand down the joints to be even but there are still peaks/valleys and there is still an overall cupping shape to the unit. Did I waste $100 in lumber? And, no, I do not have a planet or jointer. Anyone know if there is a place near 75078 i could go to have a 2.5'x 6' board planed?651765df180e5b2c3967f6214f52a5d7.jpg

The base looks good.  If you can't find a way to salvage the top by having it planed down, then you might consider constructing a new one out of 3/4" hardwood ply, and edging it with some 1x2 on edge, mitered at the corners.  Tops like that can be tough without a quality planer/jointer to handle the tough stuff for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would smooth it out a bit and call it good. Maybe put some trim on the edges so it looks cleaner from the side. Farmhouse stuff isnt supposed to be flawless. The uneven surface adds to the charm as long as it is functional.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Table saw, or a guide.for the skill saw, cut away the cupped boards, looks like you can save the last board on the right. What is that? 3 or 4 boards to replace. This time think about your clamping, I'm guessing they cupped because you clamped widthwise, you need some lumber going across the top to keep the wood from cupping.

Then whatever unevenness, you can use a bench or block planer, then sand.

The key is to take your time, hell, if I have something that needs to be done, but I'm undecided on my next move, conflicted as what to do, I'll walk away, eventually I'll have a clear decision.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could also build a jig for a plunge router to level it off and then send it smooth. That's what a lot of folks do when working with large slabs of wood.

Set your table top up as level as you can get it, then set some rails that are level and straight around it to attach your router to. Find the section of the table top that is the lowest and use the router to cut it all to that depth. Flip the table top over and repeat so both sides are parallel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I found a place off NW Highway that will plane it down for $20, which seems like the best bang for my buck.  They said I need to remove my pocket hole screws for them to plane so I'm wondering if I should replace them after? The glue-up is done but would the screws in place help with seasonal wood shifting in the future? 

Also, I'm concerned that after planing, there will only be about a 0.5" or less of material left for the top.  I wanted to do a router trim, but now am wondering if it would be best to mount the top on top of a 1/2" ply and place 1x trim pieces around the edge to hide it.  Could I have more problems with keeping the piece square by doing that?  I'm sealing the knots on the base in the next few days with a special primer, then priming and painting it.  I want to stain the top, but need to seal the knots on it.  Any recommendations on method? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

anyone interested in buying a NIB dewalt multi-cutter? DW 872.  i've got two.  my dad and i were going to use them for separate projects but figured out too late my miter saw would be the better option.  it's past the return window and i'm not going to pay for shipping back to the retailer so i'm trying to sell them.  they're $480 after tax and i have it on craigslist for $400 but i'll add a shaggy discount to $360 if any of you want one.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Spur08 said:

So I found a place off NW Highway that will plane it down for $20, which seems like the best bang for my buck.  They said I need to remove my pocket hole screws for them to plane so I'm wondering if I should replace them after? The glue-up is done but would the screws in place help with seasonal wood shifting in the future? 

Also, I'm concerned that after planing, there will only be about a 0.5" or less of material left for the top.  I wanted to do a router trim, but now am wondering if it would be best to mount the top on top of a 1/2" ply and place 1x trim pieces around the edge to hide it.  Could I have more problems with keeping the piece square by doing that?  I'm sealing the knots on the base in the next few days with a special primer, then priming and painting it.  I want to stain the top, but need to seal the knots on it.  Any recommendations on method? 

Dude, modern wood glue properly applied makes a stronger joint than screws when it comes to panels.  It does not need reinforcement.

Regarding the thickness of your panel, only .5" of material wouldn't be my preference for a table top.  I would personally just redo it as a previous poster said, by using better lumber that has been properly dried, jointed, and planed to the same thickness. 

You can just glue/screw it to a backer like plywood and add trim.  It may fix some of the bowing, it probably won't eliminate it completely.  Honestly it will probably last a few years until you know more about woodworking, and if you have kids you don't have to worry about your masterpiece being destroyed until after they're older and hopefully less destructive.

 

Edit to add: You can't stop wood movement.  The above will result in cracking, but again it's not heirloom furniture.

Edited by drt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fair enough.  For the most part, I'm just feeling out for ideas,  as most of what I'm finding/learning about is either through Pinterest or youtube.  I don't know any woodworkers so theSurl is my troubleshooting domain.  Yea, of course this isn't an heirloom piece but it is something that I'm going to have to look at.  While it doesn't (and won't) be perfect, I want to learn and grow from the process.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Replaced our sink and disposal so had to shut down the valves, had a hell of a time getting them fully closed and when I finally opened them back up the cold water comes on but hot water just trickles.  Valves are 15 years old so they need replacing, figure the hot water valve is just crapped out.  Problem is I can't find the water shutoff.  I can find the one by the street but it won't budge but everything I've read says there's the street shutoff and another one somewhere in the house.  I've checked by the water heater, every sink, the washer room, outside the house.  Finally called the city and talked to the front desk lady who says the only shutoff is the street one and I need to schedule a shutoff and then schedule them to come turn it back on.  Is she full of shit?  It's a one story house built in 2002, anywhere else I should check?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you know where the cutoff/meter by the street is (and you can't turn it off..that's weird, all of them I've used had a valve that is super easy), then you know which side of the house the water comes in on.  The house shutoff would probably be in the garage, especially if that's where your water heater is.  That also assumes you have a house side shutoff, but I'd think a house built in 2002 would.  Do you have a whole house water softener?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I put some channel locks on the street side valve and wouldn't budge, sprayed some penetrating lube and tried again an hour later and nothing.  Don't want to bust that valve so I didn't put a ton of pressure on it but enough to feel like I'd be fucked if I tried harder.  Don't have a water softener.  I've looked over every inch of the garage, I can't think of a single, logical place I haven't checked.  Is there a special tool for the street side valve?  Didn't seem to be anything special about it.  Just worried I'll call the city to shut it off, change the valves and then they'll say it'll be 24-48 hours to turn it back on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, you can buy that tool any HD in the plumbing section, and it will do the job. Just ask someone there and theyll point you in the right direction. Good tool to have anyway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, NateHitch said:

I put some channel locks on the street side valve and wouldn't budge, sprayed some penetrating lube and tried again an hour later and nothing.  Don't want to bust that valve so I didn't put a ton of pressure on it but enough to feel like I'd be fucked if I tried harder.  Don't have a water softener.  I've looked over every inch of the garage, I can't think of a single, logical place I haven't checked.  Is there a special tool for the street side valve?  Didn't seem to be anything special about it.  Just worried I'll call the city to shut it off, change the valves and then they'll say it'll be 24-48 hours to turn it back on.

austin?  our house built in 1998 doesn't have a house side switch off that we've found.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, outside of Plano.  I was just out in the garage and two pimply faced teenage city workers pulled up and shut the water off with a special tool even though I never scheduled anything with the city, was just asking for info from them.  But they were cool, gave me their cell number and said to let them know when to come back and they'd be there within 30 min so it's all good

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While you’re at it you should add a shutoff in your house. I have one right after it comes into the house and one (two) after it’s split for hot and cold. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Late to the table top party but my daughter (no pics) and I built a round table top to be fitted to a cable spool for a table in her apartment last summer.  We used 1x red oak from Home Depot with a AC plywood base.  We glued up the boards two or three at a time making sure we got good edge joints and that everything was flat.  Used a bunch of cheap bar clamps from Harbor Freight (50") for the last glue up.  Used the #5 plane on a few high spots and then the RO sander to knock it down smooth.   Built a few quick stools out of 2x12 YP to go with it.

IMG_5400.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the water shut off topic, I have one in my house, but my previous house did not. I've had the main valve at the street stick before and had to have the water company come and shut it off. I was worried I'd break it and be proper fucked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...