Jump to content
Gil Bang

tell me about PEX plumbing

Recommended Posts

So, my house is raised foundation, and I just repaired about the 5th or 6th leak in the copper pipes in the last couple of years.  

Obviously, the copper has gone to shit and it's time for me to repipe.  I can sweat copper better than most guys, but I'm curious about PEX.  It's a lot cheaper, and it seems like it would be a lot easier and faster.   I'm thinking that I can leave the copper in place for the most part, and zip tie the new PEX to the old copper.   

Thoughts?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very popular in Houston and everyone I know who has done it is happy with the results. Use a repiping specialist, not a general plumber

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s by far the most common product used today.

 I haven’t encountered any downsides.  Way faster to install.

I wouldn’t think, “strapping to existing copper” would pass inspection.  May well be ok functionally.

You may want to consider a whole house filter, probably the residual chlorine levels eating the copper pipe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It can transition easily and legally to existing copper through adapters or even push press fittings such as shark bites.  It's very resistant to freezing and corrosion.  If you're doing very much of it, you'll want to choose a brand and invest in some crimpers for that brand.  I like Viega best but the crimpers will cost up to $200 each and you'll likely need 3/4" and 1/2".  The plumbing code we use in Austin says the PEX pipe should be supported every 30" which if nothing else is a good rule of thumb to keep your pipes from rattling.  It's also a good idea to insulate as much of your hot water pipe as you can for the sake of energy efficiency.  Chances are if you're keeping any old copper pipe, your work may dislodge some of the calcium buildup inside the pipes.  That buildup could reduce water flow.  You'll want to  make sure and flush some of that out by running water through an outside hose bib when you turn your water back on.  Also, it'll help to clean your aerators and shower heads afterwards.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, msbesq said:

Very popular in Houston and everyone I know who has done it is happy with the results. Use a repiping specialist, not a general plumber

I'll be doing it myself.  At least in the crawlspace.

10 hours ago, Incredulity said:

It’s by far the most common product used today.

 I haven’t encountered any downsides.  Way faster to install.

I wouldn’t think, “strapping to existing copper” would pass inspection.  May well be ok functionally.

You may want to consider a whole house filter, probably the residual chlorine levels eating the copper pipe.

I won't be pulling a building permit for this.  IDGAF about inspection, I just want to do it "right".

4 hours ago, milkman said:

Take a look at Uponor.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Off to the googles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Gil Bang said:

I'll be doing it myself.  At least in the crawlspace.

I won't be pulling a building permit for this.  IDGAF about inspection, I just want to do it "right".

Off to the googles.

It's very easy to work with and is much faster to do than copper. I redid my whole house with it. Great product. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Replaced the main line to my house with pex. So flexible it comes on a spool. If the plumber who put it in is to be believed, it's the last mainline pipe this house will ever need.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Best thing to hit construction since asbestos and lead paint! Kidding.... but can’t help but wonder what’ll be discovered about it in 30 years that’ll lead to having to disclose it on a sellers disclosure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Best thing to hit construction since asbestos and lead paint! Kidding.... but can’t help but wonder what’ll be discovered about it in 30 years that’ll lead to having to disclose it on a sellers disclosure.
I've wondered about that as well.

I didn't realize you could use it for the mainline

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s completely taken over SF construction. CPVC is the standard on most commercial/ MF construction unless Unions are involved.

 

PEX started as a piping for radiant floor heating in the US and is from Europe. They treat their water differently than we do. We add a ton of chlorine and chloride. There is some serious thought that PEX won’t be able to withstand those conditions in the long term just like the pin hole leaks in copper. 
 

Won’t even get started on water quality but it’s easier to install and we have no skilled labor anymore. There are going to be multiple class action lawsuits over PEX over the next 10 years but it all is being installed according to code.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, LebongJames said:

It’s completely taken over SF construction. CPVC is the standard on most commercial/ MF construction unless Unions are involved.

 

PEX started as a piping for radiant floor heating in the US and is from Europe. They treat their water differently than we do. We add a ton of chlorine and chloride. There is some serious thought that PEX won’t be able to withstand those conditions in the long term just like the pin hole leaks in copper. 
 

Won’t even get started on water quality but it’s easier to install and we have no skilled labor anymore. There are going to be multiple class action lawsuits over PEX over the next 10 years but it all is being installed according to code.

Because of installation practices or water quality issues?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Install can be an issue but it’s pretty easy, that’s the main reason it has gotten so popular. It’s the water quality. The chlorine and chloride interact with the cross link polyurethane and causes chemical degradation. 

Edited by LebongJames

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LebongJames said:

Install can be an issue but it’s pretty easy, that’s the main reason it has gotten so popular. It’s the water quality. The chlorine and chloride interact with the cross link polyurethane and causes chemical degradation. 

In the last 8 years I had a tankless hot water heated installed.  During that process and rerouting the position of the old tanked one to an exterior tankless a lot of pex was introduced.  (we had a lot of drywall down so it made it easy to do for the plumber who also added a lot of extra pex to provide a system that held more water to allow less need to pull from far away after someone had primed hot water into the system)

Anyway, lots of pex now in that house.

A few years later the elbow area of the main source feed into that same house from the street was leaking pretty badly.  went ahead and ran a complete homerun pex line from the street to the house.(added a shutoff at both ends)

So I have a vested interest in your reports about the chlorine from the city affecting it, perhaps, in the years to come?  No issues as of yet to report.

Do you have any specific links of note or specific personal experience with your reports about the issues you allude to in your post?  I hadn't given my repairs a second thought till now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

California approved it's use in 2018. I only know this cause I looked it up as I too have been skeptical of PEX.So if Cali allows it, it's probably safe. But I needed to replace some crapped out valves in a house in Corpus and pex it was.  I still simply cannot bring myself to believe completely in the shark bite product (but I know it works), but matched the original stainless steel collars and bought one of the upper mid range tools. (home Depot) The better ones have a clear "click" down so that you know you have secured the fitting properly. I didn't trust the fittings until I didn't see water spurt out in all honesty.

Ultimately it was simple, but I has super tight clearance on one fitting that made it a little tough. As for the connection with copper. here's bobvila https://www.bobvila.com/articles/connecting-pex-to-copper-or-pvc/

The one thing I really dislike about PEX is the same thing that makes it easy to work with, flexibility.  IIt is SUPER important to secure the stub outs securely to a stud.  They did a shitty job in the one I did, and I had to cut into a wall to secure the stub out for the shower PITA.

Good luck, if you can sweat copper you are gonna find working with this shit a breeze.  I guess the only negative is if your a a color blind plumber... 😉

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...