Jump to content
LTtxfan

Chris Ash Defense

Recommended Posts

7 minutes ago, texifornia said:

Well I guess it's for the best we didn't hire this dude

 

Woah. Dodge a major bullet 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
29 minutes ago, texifornia said:

Well I guess it's for the best we didn't hire this dude

 

giphy.gif

Edited by LTtxfan
Xian beat me to it... LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Horns247 Roundtable: Realistic expectations for Texas defense

Quote

Each week, the Horns247 staff comes together for our Roundtable discussion, where we take on some more in-depth topics regarding the University of Texas.

The Longhorns are making their way back to campus beginning this week as Texas prepares to start voluntary summer workouts on June 15. This offseason was expected to allow Texas time to implement and learn the new schemes on both sides of the ball under first-year coordinators, OC Mike Yurcich and DC Chris Ash. But the coronavirus pandemic put a hold on Texas getting physical reps in spring practice, which would have been beneficial especially on defense since Ash intends to implement an entirely new scheme compared to what the Longhorns had become accustomed to under former defensive coordinator Todd Orlando.

But even without the 15 spring practices, Texas has a bit of an advantage with nine starters returning to the defense from last year’s squad. With that said, the Horns247 Roundtable topic is… What are realistic expectations for the Texas defense this season and why?

Bobby Burton

I’m not so much about national stats or improvement. But I see zero reason Texas shouldn’t be the best D in the Big 12. That means from a total yardage standpoint and points against category. Texas should have the best front four in the league, and the Longhorns should have the best secondary in the conference. They have some talent at linebacker; they just have to get reps and find the right fits. While Sam Ehlinger gets a lot of the hype nationally, the Horns should be able to rely on Texas defense just as much.

Chip Brown

The Texas defense, which took steps back the past two seasons, should be one of the reasons the Longhorns make a Big 12 title run in 2020. After giving up 21.2 points per game in 2017 when Texas had 10 returning starters on defense as well as the nation's best punter (Michael Dickson pinning opposing offenses to their own goal lines), the Longhorns gave up an average of 25.9 points in 2018 and 27.5 points in 2019.

With nine starters back on defense in 2020, led by outside linebacker Joseph Ossai, I expect the Texas defense to give up in the neighborhood of 24 points per game. The Texas defense catches a bit of a break to open the season against rebuilding South Florida under first-year coach Jeff Scott; an LSU offense with only three starters back; a UTEP team that went 1-11 last year breaking in a new quarterback; as well as a road trip to Kansas State, which lost its entire offensive line and has the fewest returning starters of any Big 12 team. Those four games should be plenty for the Horns' D to have settled into roles under new coordinator Chris Ash by the time the Red River Shootout rolls around on Oct. 10.

Jeff Howe

If one were to look at nothing but history, you can count on Chris Ash’s first Texas defense being one of the top units in the country when the dust settles. Specifically, Ash can realistically be expected to field a Top 30 caliber defense based on what his predecessors accomplished. When Manny Diaz took over for Will Muschamp in 2011, he fielded a defense that in a Big 12 where Robert Griffin III won a Heisman Trophy and Oklahoma State came a shocking loss to Iowa State away from playing for a national championship finished No. 11 nationally in total defense (306.8 yards per game allowed).

The 2011 Longhorn defense propped up an offense that suffered from shaky quarterback play throughout the season and a slew of injuries at running back late in the campaign to help Texas to an 8-5 finish with a No. 33 national finish in points per game allowed (22.2). The first year on the Forty Acres for Charlie Strong and Vance Bedford saw the Longhorns make a dramatic defensive turnaround in a 2014 season where the unit drug a forgettable offense to six wins and a bowl berth.

Compared to the previous season, yards per play allowed dropped from 5.5 to 4.7 (348.5 yards per game allowed ranked No. 25 in the country), yards per rushing attempt dropped from 4.4 to 3.9, interceptions forced improved from 10 to 15 and points per game allowed dropped from 25.8 to 23.8, which was good for a No. 31 finish nationally (the 2014 Longhorns held four opponents to 16 points or loss, the defense keeping North Texas and Kansas off of the scoreboard).

After things fell off a cliff by the end of Strong’s tenure, Todd Orlando picked up the pieces and led one of the nation’s best defenses in 2017. In Orlando’s first season, yards per game allowed improved from 448.2 to 365.8 (tied for No. 41 in the country), yards per play improved from 5.6 to 5.2, yards per carry dropped dramatically from 4.1 in 2016 to 3.01 in 2017, interceptions forced went up from 10 to 16 and points per game allowed improved from 31.5 to 21.2 (No. 29 nationally).

Certainly, this brings up the point that a Texas defensive coordinator will have to find a way to maintain success after enjoying it initially. Muschamp (2010), Greg Robinson (2004) and Gene Chizik (2006) are the only defensive coordinators since Mack Brown’s first season in 1998 to not have their time with the Longhorns end by way of resigning or being fired.

With that said, like the three men who sat in the defensive coordinator’s chair before him, Ash inherits an experienced group of talented defenders hungry to prove themselves. In a year where there’s either quarterback or uncertainty for nearly every Big 12 program other than Texas with Sam Ehlinger back as a four-year starter, the conditions are ripe for the Longhorns one of the top three defenses in the conference (something Diaz, Bedford and Orlando did with their units finish third or better in the conference in both scoring and total defense in their respective first seasons).

Taylor Estes

I’ll start this off by saying this: No pressure Chris Ash. I say that because with the amount of talent returning to the defense this season, there’s honestly no reason for Texas to not field the best defense in the Big 12. Oklahoma State also has a number of returning starters on defense, but the reality is the amount of talent Texas has signed over the last three recruiting cycles should allow for the Longhorns to have a leg up on the Cowboys’ returning starters.

Assuming the players take the new scheme and run with it, there’s no excuse for Texas to not have a solid defense in 2020, and Ash will likely be viewed as a genius in Year 1, similar to how the previous three defensive coordinators have been when they took over veteran units in their first season on the job. The real question for me will be if Texas finds success defensively this season (which it should), if Ash will be able to maintain that success in Year 2 — something the previous three DCs were unable to accomplish during their time on the Forty Acres.

Mike Roach

I think realistic expectations for this defense is to be one of the best in the conference next year. The D is as experienced and athletic as any other team out there, and the guys showed in the Alamo Bowl that the defense could be effective when consistently put in a position to make plays. Year 3 of Joseph Ossai will be huge for Chris Ash, and if they can generate a consistent pass rush, we should see a much-improved defense.

Nick Harris

I think it’s realistic to expect a solid outing from the Texas defense this year. We saw a glimpse of what the Longhorns were capable of during the Alamo Bowl and I think it’s realistic to expect them to carry that into 2020. With all of the injuries on the defense last year, a lot of guys are returning with solid experience and with the implementation of a possibly more effective scheme by Chris Ash, this year’s Longhorn defense could prove to be one of the best in recent years.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I ever see Ossai drop back in pass coverage, I am going to post a stern message on this very board. Govern yourselves accordingly. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, satyanash said:

Bobby Burton

I’m not so much about national stats or improvement. But I see zero reason Texas shouldn’t be the best D in the Big 12. That means from a total yardage standpoint and points against category. Texas should have the best front four in the league, and the Longhorns should have the best secondary in the conference. They have some talent at linebacker; they just have to get reps and find the right fits. While Sam Ehlinger gets a lot of the hype nationally, the Horns should be able to rely on Texas defense just as much.

Fuck total yardage as a metric. The only thing we need to make happen is to make the ratio of points scored to points allowed greater than one, EVERY. SINGLE. GAME. I don't care, nor should you, what the numbers are, just their ratio.

 

(POINTS SCORED) / (POINTS ALLOWED)  >  1

EVERY FUCKING GAME

All else takes care of itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Tex Long said:

Fuck total yardage as a metric. The only thing we need to make happen is to make the ratio of points scored to points allowed greater than one, EVERY. SINGLE. GAME. I don't care, nor should you, what the numbers are, just their ratio.

 

(POINTS SCORED) / (POINTS ALLOWED)  >  1

EVERY FUCKING GAME

All else takes care of itself.

Yea Texas Tech and Washington State took this approach, they just seem to have had a problem with the denominator, no matter how good they got at making the numerator fairly large. Just be good at both ends and the greater than one will come easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, DanTheHorn said:

Yea Texas Tech and Washington State Mike Leach took this approach, they just seem to have had a problem with the denominator, no matter how good they got at making the numerator fairly large. Just be good at both ends and the greater than one will come easy.

Riley and Meyer (now Day) take that approach as well... it's worked fairly well for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Riley and Meyer (now Day) take that approach as well... it's worked fairly well for them.
Ohio State plays defense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Snacks said:
6 hours ago, Tex Long said:
Riley and Meyer (now Day) take that approach as well... it's worked fairly well for them.

Ohio State plays defense.

Thank the spirits, somebody gets it. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Ash tOSU'ed pretty decent... and I think he might have (almost) as much talent here...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Thiefery said:

tosu defense got lit up in 2018 despite being so talented and deep.

And they lost nearly two games, but not quite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Tex Long said:

And they lost nearly two games, but not quite.

In our losses outside LSU, offense really didn't show up.  Against Iowa St, the offense tip toed into 3 and outs til late in the 2nd qtr.  Non existent vs baylor. We already know what happened in Dallas.

With the new OC, I really hope we don't see the funks the offense experienced last season.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Thiefery said:

In our losses outside LSU, offense really didn't show up.  Against Iowa St, the offense tip toed into 3 and outs til late in the 2nd qtr.  Non existent vs baylor. We already know what happened in Dallas.

With the new OC, I really hope we don't see the funks the offense experienced last season.

Not disagreeing with you, but the thread is about Ash, no?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wait, I forgot... Shirley Bevo. Nevermind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Tex Long said:

Not disagreeing with you, but the thread is about Ash, no?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wait, I forgot... Shirley Bevo. Nevermind.

What I expect is Ash to contribute at least 10 pts a game with turnovers.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Thiefery said:

What I expect is Ash to contribute at least 10 pts a game with turnovers.  

That would be good, but what I expect is he'll build a D that won't give up too many touchdowns on Third and Orlando 17 which will probably even out about the same...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

https://footballscoop.com/news/the-20-most-important-assistant-coaching-hires-of-the-2020-season-no-6-chris-ash-texas/

The 20 most important assistant coaching hires of the 2020 season — No. 6: Chris Ash, Texas 

Chris-Ash.jpg?zoom=1.3312500715255737&re

By Zach Barnett -    June 11, 2020

Who: Chris Ash, Texas

Title: Defensive coordinator/safeties coach

Previous stop: Rutgers head coach (2016-19)

Why he’s important: You never want to draw too many conclusions off of one game, particularly a game where the coach we’re talking about didn’t even coach. But let’s examine the 2019 Alamo Bowl.   As the clock (literally) wound down on the worst decade in the program’s modern history, Texas put together one of its best defensive performances of the 2010s. The ‘Horns limited Utah to 3.5 yards per rush, 5.5 yards per pass attempt, collected five sacks, racked up 21 yards in TFLs on rushing downs, won 10 of 14 third downs, permitted just 15 first downs and just generally kicked tail in a 38-10 win.

After playing off the ball all season, rising junior Joseph Ossai generated first-round hype in moving to an edge position in the ‘Horns’ new 4-down front, earning game MVP honors with nine tackles, six TFLs and three sacks.

And, again: It was just one game. Not only that, this one game was a de facto home game for Texas, while Utah was checked out after losing its spot in the Playoff in a Pac-12 Championship loss to Oregon.

Still, it was enough to get observers to say, Where has that been all season?  And when you get down to it, isn’t that Ash’s entire job this season?

Texas returns 82 percent of the production from a defense that will feature the most talent of any since the Mack Brown era. (Yes, the recruiting services always seem to like UT’s classes, but the school hadn’t pulled back-to-back Top 3 classes, as it did in 2018-19, since the early Mack era.)

The program has very much earned its “I’ll believe it when I see it” reputation to this point. The Longhorns closed the year strong — collecting nine sacks in their final two games after compiling just 18 in their first 11 contests — but many of those same players were lit aflame by LSU, and Oklahoma, and, uh, TCU and Kansas. TCU quarterback Max Duggan threw for a season-high 10.1 yards per attempt in a 37-27 win over Texas, and Kansas dropped 48 in Brent Dearmon’s first game as offensive coordinator.

The Longhorns believe a switch from Orlando’s 3-3-5 to Ash’s 4-2-5, with Ossai as one of the four, is the key to unlocking the talent on the roster.   “I don’t think it’s any secret that we want to be in some more four-man front,” Herman said. “If we are in a three-man front, I think our guys need to be in position to rush the passer — playing more five-technique than 4i — but if that gets the 11 best on the field, that’s what we’ll do.”

“We want to be more disruptive and I think this scheme gives us the opportunity to do just that,” Ossai told 247Sports. “The D-line or the front seven, linebackers included, needs to set the tone so that the game can be [dictated]. If you can control the line you can control the run, you can put pressure on the quarterback, you can predict the plays of the offense and you can call the game easier.   “It’s just a better game and it flows better for us if the defense can be dominant, especially up front,” he added. “We’re taking that and we’re running with it.”

“If we want to win at a high level,” Ash said, “be a team that can win championships here, it’s going to start at the front back.”

Ash, who worked with Herman at Iowa State and Ohio State, leads an almost entirely new defensive staff. Jay Valai joined him from Rutgers as cornerbacks coach, Mark Hagen was hired from Indiana as defensive tackles coach, and Coleman Hutzler left South Carolina to coach linebackers. (Defensive ends coach Oscar Giles is the lone survivor.)

“When I look up front, there are a lot of big, strong, physical players that are coming back that played a lot of snaps last year,” Ash said in February. “We have to identify who are going to be our primary pass rushers; I think Joseph (Ossai) has an opportunity to be one of those types of guys. And then I look at the secondary and the number of players that are coming back that have played snaps in games, there are a lot — 14, 15, 16 guys that have played or have a chance to play for us moving forward… It has the most players that have the potential to play of any secondary I’ve been a part of in my career.”

It’s the job of those men to make sure, after a decade of falling short, that the whole finally adds up to the sum of its parts.

“I’m not concerned about what happened in the past. The past is behind us,” Ash said. “We’re focused on the process to get this defense to where everyone would like it to be.”

 

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

https://247sports.com/college/texas/LongFormArticle/College-football-2020-season-most-important-players-coaches-148546317/#148546317_4

 

The 20 people who will swing the 2020 college football season

By BARTON SIMMONS      8 hours ago

 

CHRIS ASH, DC, TEXAS

7790640.jpg?fit=bounds&crop=620:320,offs

(Photo: Ed Mulholland, USA TODAY Sports)

Let's go with another coordinator here. In 2018, Tom Herman landed the No. 3 recruiting class in the nation and five of the top six players in the class were defenders. And yet, two years later he’s turned to a new defensive coordinator, Chris Ash, to try to unlock all that talent. The former Rutgers coach who won a national title with Herman in 2014 at Ohio State, Ash has a lot of pressure on his shoulders ... but he also has a lot to work with: Can Jalen Green become a lockdown cornerback? Does moving Joseph Ossai to defensive end result in a ferocious pas-rush? In a crowded defensive backs room, does former Top247 five-star DeMarvion Overshown reach his potential as a new-age, hybrid linebacker? If Ash can pull it out of them, his buddy Herman may finally have that breakthrough season.

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...