Jump to content

Dads what cha reading to your kids?


Recommended Posts

My 10 year old (started when he was 9)

0142400580.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_SX500_.jpg

and

9781948959315-us.jpg

They've held up extremely well, and are very enjoyable for my kid, but the only problem is that he's jealous of what all they were doing/got to do.  We're not exactly helicopter parents, but yeah, he's not going to be sailing any midget submarines around Lake Travis and fucking with people.  Well, if he somehow does, I'll be extremely proud.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Mine are now 15 and 18 (and about to graduate), so you are hitting me in the feels.

I have an admitted bias towards things I remember from when I was little (thus making them classics, irrefutable in their cultural significance), but:

Arnold Lobel:  arguably the GOAT as far as I'm concerned.  "Frog and Toad" series is the most prolific, and is awesome.  Don't sleep on "Small Pig" either.  That said, "Owl at Home" may be his greatest single work.  I could recite "Owl and the Moon" from memory after having read it to mine hundreds of times, and is pure poetry.  When my boys have their own kids, they will be receiving a bundle of Lobel books as gifts.

Seuss:  A given, but the Sleep Book is a bedtime gem. Another I know by heart.

Judith Viorst:  Alexander and the THNGVBD is a given.  My Mama Says is good for those with nighttime fears.

Richard Scarry: Great picture books, less so at bedtime due to all the shit going on with fucking Dingo Dog driving erratically all over the fucking place.  Some antiquated ideas for sure, but what little I know of housing construction, electricity generation, and papermill operations comes from "What Do People Do All Day."

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster:  one of the great books ever written.  Save this for when they are 8 or 9, when they are wondering why they should learn this stuff and why any of it matters.  Shit, most adults need to read it now.  I just discovered  the annotated version and am reading it myself.  Amazing.

I agree that the Great Brain series is excellent, though that was more independent reading for me and mine.

When they are bigger, The Hobbit and CS Lewis' Narnia books are excellent.

The Hank the Cowdog books are great for upper single digit kids and are even better on audio, as read by Texas (and Plan II) grad John Erickson.


Damn, it went fast.

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/3/2023 at 11:17 PM, Coach pop a bitch said:

download.jpegmy 5 year old son has been going through a bug faze. Hes loving this.

My oldest daughter is all about animals, including bugs.  The other day I bought off amazon a 12 piece set of insects in resin for $30.  She went crazy for them (surprised my youngest did too).  Might be something you want to buy for him.

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/15/2023 at 10:10 PM, Damor said:

Mine are now 15 and 18 (and about to graduate), so you are hitting me in the feels.

I have an admitted bias towards things I remember from when I was little (thus making them classics, irrefutable in their cultural significance), but:

Arnold Lobel:  arguably the GOAT as far as I'm concerned.  "Frog and Toad" series is the most prolific, and is awesome.  Don't sleep on "Small Pig" either.  That said, "Owl at Home" may be his greatest single work.  I could recite "Owl and the Moon" from memory after having read it to mine hundreds of times, and is pure poetry.  When my boys have their own kids, they will be receiving a bundle of Lobel books as gifts.

Seuss:  A given, but the Sleep Book is a bedtime gem. Another I know by heart.

Judith Viorst:  Alexander and the THNGVBD is a given.  My Mama Says is good for those with nighttime fears.

Richard Scarry: Great picture books, less so at bedtime due to all the shit going on with fucking Dingo Dog driving erratically all over the fucking place.  Some antiquated ideas for sure, but what little I know of housing construction, electricity generation, and papermill operations comes from "What Do People Do All Day."

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster:  one of the great books ever written.  Save this for when they are 8 or 9, when they are wondering why they should learn this stuff and why any of it matters.  Shit, most adults need to read it now.  I just discovered  the annotated version and am reading it myself.  Amazing.

I agree that the Great Brain series is excellent, though that was more independent reading for me and mine.

When they are bigger, The Hobbit and CS Lewis' Narnia books are excellent.

The Hank the Cowdog books are great for upper single digit kids and are even better on audio, as read by Texas (and Plan II) grad John Erickson.


Damn, it went fast.

Frog and toad were my favorite as a kid. Fast forward 30+ years they are my sons favorite.  

Phantom tollbooth is just amazing.  How is that book not mentioned on the all-time greatest list ever?

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

√ó
√ó
  • Create New...