Jump to content
coolsax

Hi Fi and Home theater set ups

Recommended Posts

On 3/25/2019 at 6:33 PM, VABuckeye said:

Either Siri or a higher end control system like Crestron, Control 4 or Savant.  There are some third party remotes you can use.  The three I mentioned can control it via IP. 

Lulz.  Crestron and Savant will run several hundred thousand dollars to implement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stumbled across this as a pretty neat piece of gear.  https://www.whathifi.com/nad/c-338/review

Has a phono stage and chromecast built in.  So it doesn't have to have the various and sundry software built into it (pandora, spotify, etc.).

So, if you can tolerate the quality of streamed audio, just point your phone at it, and you have your radio tuner, digital music service, etc all right there.  Add speakers and turntable, if inclined and fin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Chewbacca said:

Lulz.  Crestron and Savant will run several hundred thousand dollars to implement.

Incorrect.  It all depends on how much one wants to control and how deep down the rabbit hole they want to go.  A simple Crestron system using phones and tablets for control could easily done for less than $10k.  Probably less than that.  You don't have to use Crestron amps or gear other than the brain and a couple of other pieces at most.  You can control regular amps and devices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TwiceHorn said:

Stumbled across this as a pretty neat piece of gear.  https://www.whathifi.com/nad/c-338/review

Has a phono stage and chromecast built in.  So it doesn't have to have the various and sundry software built into it (pandora, spotify, etc.).

So, if you can tolerate the quality of streamed audio, just point your phone at it, and you have your radio tuner, digital music service, etc all right there.  Add speakers and turntable, if inclined and fin.

Or you could get a Deezer or Tidal subscription and send it to your audio system via a Chromecast connected to your TV and listen to FLAC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, VABuckeye said:

Or you could get a Deezer or Tidal subscription and send it to your audio system via a Chromecast connected to your TV and listen to FLAC.

Already do that.  Seems like a bit of a jury rig, but it works.  If I were in the market for the amp portion of the system, I would strongly consider that.

There are a few amp/"receivers" that have a variety of streaming "apps" installed, but they all seem to be ginormous a/v looking things.  I'm kind of resistant to "component spread."

Do you find that streaming FLAC gives you "CD quality"?  I know the source is good, but I'm curious about what kind of errors casting and wifi introduce.

Edited by TwiceHorn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spotify only offers high quality (320 kbps) from the desktop client, so I don't know if some of these smartphone relay device would work for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/25/2019 at 5:11 PM, hobbes2702 said:

Maybe this will be the best thread for my question. Let’s say I want to put 2 50” TVs above a 75” TV and have an Apple TV on each. What options are there for control of that or would the only option be using the Apple TV remotes? Is there a single remote solution/home control that would work?

Nice humblebrag.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most vintage Marantz receivers(I have three) have pre out/main in that have jumpers. Depending on the sub you can usually split the receiver pre outs and send one to the sub and one back to the main in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Buzzrock said:

Spotify only offers high quality (320 kbps) from the desktop client, so I don't know if some of these smartphone relay device would work for that.

Yeah, but I think all of these services are constrained to turn down the bitrate if your connection (not just speed, but latency, jitter, etc.) is going to affect the sound.  Even audiophile customers are gonna get grumpy if their streams buffer and drop because of some screw up in the connection.  And they do it automatically and intermittently, AFAIK, so you can't really be sure you're getting FLAC or 320 mp3 quality at any given time.  You can certainly detect variation in a Spotify stream within a single song.

I'm more or less reconciled to the convenience of it at some sacrifice to sound quality.

Edited by TwiceHorn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, TwiceHorn said:

Yeah, but I think all of these services are constrained to turn down the bitrate if your connection (not just speed, but latency, jitter, etc.) is going to affect the sound.  Even audiophile customers are gonna get grumpy if their streams buffer and drop because of some screw up in the connection.  And they do it automatically and intermittently, AFAIK, so you can't really be sure you're getting FLAC or 320 mp3 quality at any given time.  You can certainly detect variation in a Spotify stream within a single song.

I'm more or less reconciled to the convenience of it at some sacrifice to sound quality.

Why do you think they change the audio quality mid-song? I couldn't find any info on that on a quick Google.

One other tip I read was to turn volume normalization off for the best sound quality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Buzzrock said:

Why do you think they change the audio quality mid-song? I couldn't find any info on that on a quick Google.

One other tip I read was to turn volume normalization off for the best sound quality.

First it's the nature of any streaming service that they avoid buffering and other connection errors.  They achieve that by modifying the bit rate of the stream in close to real time.  So the source may be FLAC, or WAV, or high-bitrate mp3, and that is the fidelity they strive for, the reality is that it varies constantly (at least with the more consumer-oriented Spotify, Deezer and Tidal may be a little different) and the high-bitrate may be more aspirational than actual.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/22/2019 at 2:39 PM, hobbes2702 said:

Golden Ear I believe can be had for around that for an entry level model.

Def Tech is always solid for value/performance.

 

Looks like it may be between these two.

Price/performance-wise are pretty damn good for both.  That being said, I do like some low end in my set up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m moving into a new house this week. It has several built in speakers including an entire old Bose Acoustimass that was left behind. I have two sets of Mirage speakers that I’m bringing with me. 

Is there something besides a standard AVR type receiver that can drive standard copper-wired speakers? I have two older receivers that work fine but they are bulky and don’t have any HDMI inputs. I can get around that by using the HDMI on TVs, but I’m wondering if there is something better these days. 

And yes I know the general reputation of the Acoustimass. But hey it was free and it’s all wired up so I’m going to make use of it for now. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Rip76 said:

Looks like it may be between these two.

Price/performance-wise are pretty damn good for both.  That being said, I do like some low end in my set up.

With Definitive Technoloy you have to be very careful with speaker placement if you get into their bipolar floorstanding speakers.  They need a LOT of space behind them or they sound like shit.  Other than placement issues they're a solid mid-fi choice.  Mid-fi is not intended as an insult to the speakers.  It is what they are which is a nice performing speaker at a reasonable price point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Is there something besides a standard AVR type receiver that can drive standard copper-wired speakers? I have two older receivers that work fine but they are bulky and don’t have any HDMI inputs. I can get around that by using the HDMI on TVs, but I’m wondering if there is something better these days. 

Something better would be a multi-channel amp suited to whole house audio (if that's what you're aiming for).  How many speaker pairs in how many rooms?  You can also use an impedance matching speaker selector but it's a bandaid type of a solution.  It would help if you can tell me what you want the speakers to play.  Music?  TV?  Both?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Buzzrock said:

I’m moving into a new house this week. It has several built in speakers including an entire old Bose Acoustimass that was left behind. I have two sets of Mirage speakers that I’m bringing with me. 

Is there something besides a standard AVR type receiver that can drive standard copper-wired speakers? I have two older receivers that work fine but they are bulky and don’t have any HDMI inputs. I can get around that by using the HDMI on TVs, but I’m wondering if there is something better these days. 

And yes I know the general reputation of the Acoustimass. But hey it was free and it’s all wired up so I’m going to make use of it for now. 

I assume the Acoustimass thing is 5.1?  In that case, its going to be a PITA to try to run that without an AV receiver that does 5.1.  If you just want to do 2-channel, you can employ your existing receiver and speakers by the optical audio out of the TV into the receiver (assuming there is one), and the conventional inputs for your audio sources. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, TwiceHorn said:

I assume the Acoustimass thing is 5.1?  In that case, its going to be a PITA to try to run that without an AV receiver that does 5.1.  If you just want to do 2-channel, you can employ your existing receiver and speakers by the optical audio out of the TV into the receiver (assuming there is one), and the conventional inputs for your audio sources. 

Acoustimass has a shitty implementation.  You have to connect your speakers to an Acoustimass module and that then connects to a box that your sources are connected to.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Upstairs movie room: wired for 5.1 with two speakers already in the ceiling for rear surrounds. I’ll probably just use one of my existing 5.1 AVRs for that and Mirages for the fronts, center, and sub. Need to get a projector. Probably just got 1080p since they are cheap and kids won’t care about 4K.

Main level has two speakers in the ceiling in the kitchen and HDMI run over the fireplace in the den. All wires run back to a single cabinet in the den. Might just go with a sound bar for the TV over the fireplace and will need something to run the kitchen speakers. This looks like it would do the trick but it ain’t cheap:

Yamaha Music Cast Audio Component Amplifier Dark Silver (WXA-50), Works with Alexa https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01EIBYRUA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_5nKOCbZ6Y0C00

Basement has the Bose setup in one room situated around a big TV, and then two more ceiling mount speakers in the other main bar room. I suppose I could upgrade to a new AVR with a second zone to drive the ceiling speakers in the bar room. I’d like to add external speakers for the terrace outside the basement at some point.

I’m going to use the other (bigger) pair of Mirages in a different basement room with all my guitars and whatnot just for music listening/jam along. May just get a basic stereo receiver for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, VABuckeye said:

Acoustimass has a shitty implementation.  You have to connect your speakers to an Acoustimass module and that then connects to a box that your sources are connected to.  

Oh geez.  I think I knew that at one time.  FIL runs a bose something or other 5.1 off a Yamaha or Pioneer AV receiver.  I don't know whats involved.  But it sounds like a PITA, regardless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buzzrock,

Seems like you have most of it figured out.  That Yamaha box looks like a slick little device and the cost isn't bad when you compare it to similar devices.  Because it utilizes Alexa you have your choice or a bunch of streaming services to play through it.

Soundbar over the fireplace seems like a good idea as you don't have a lot of choices when it comes to speakers and fireplaces.  With Bose Acoustimass you're stuck with their proprietary setup.  Hopefully the previous owner left the parts that make it run as well as the speakers.

For the bar and future outdoors you can just use an existing receiver and get an impedance matching speaker selector to drive both pairs.  You'll be stuck with the same source for both but you will be able to choose either pair or both on the front of the speaker selector.

The downside to all of this is that you're basically stuck with a different system to run almost every pair of speakers in the house.  Multiple remotes and there's no way to simply turn the whole house on and play the same thing in every room.  Even if you tried there's no way you'd be synced perfectly in every room and it would sound echoey as hell in the house.

Edited by VABuckeye

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh geez.  I think I knew that at one time.  FIL runs a bose something or other 5.1 off a Yamaha or Pioneer AV receiver.  I don't know whats involved.  But it sounds like a PITA, regardless.


It’s not that big a deal. It connects to a AVR the same way that regular speakers do. The cubes just connect to the sub first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Buzzrock,
Seems like you have most of it figured out.  That Yamaha box looks like a slick little device and the cost isn't bad when you compare it to similar devices.  Because it utilizes Alexa you have your choice or a bunch of streaming services to play through it.
Soundbar over the fireplace seems like a good idea as you don't have a lot of choices when it comes to speakers and fireplaces.  With Bose Acoustimass you're stuck with their proprietary setup.  Hopefully the previous owner left the parts that make it run as well as the speakers.
For the bar and future outdoors you can just use an existing receiver and get an impedance matching speaker selector to drive both pairs.  You'll be stuck with the same source for both but you will be able to choose either pair or both on the front of the speaker selector.
The downside to all of this is that you're basically stuck with a different system to run almost every pair of speakers in the house.  Multiple remotes and there's no way to simply turn the whole house on and play the same thing in every room.  Even if you tried there's no way you'd be synced perfectly in every room and it would sound echoey as hell in the house.


Yeah I’m trying to make the most of what I have because this move is costing me enough (in both cash and sanity) already.

I started reading about the Yamaha Musiccast technology and it seems pretty slick. Put separate receivers all on the same WiFi network and they can all talk to each other and be controlled centrally kind of like Sonos. If I can find some deals on some older versions of those on EBay or whatever then I might go that route.

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F303111432941

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, VABuckeye said:

With Definitive Technoloy you have to be very careful with speaker placement if you get into their bipolar floorstanding speakers.  They need a LOT of space behind them or they sound like shit.  Other than placement issues they're a solid mid-fi choice.  Mid-fi is not intended as an insult to the speakers.  It is what they are which is a nice performing speaker at a reasonable price point.

Wait, what?  A bipole should not need much more space behind it than a front-firing speaker.  The frequencies in question on the DefTechs are mostly 1 kHz and above, which implies a half-wavelength round trip of 7 inches to get significant cancellation with the front-firing drivers.  That would say don't put the thing 3.5" from the wall (not even accounting for the depth of the cabinet), and maybe 3X that would be more appropriate.  Doesn't seem ridiculous to me.

What have you heard in terms of "sounds like shit" when too close to the wall?

Not that I'm a fan of DefTech, I think that team did far better with the GoldenEar line.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitive Technology speakers are notorious for needing a lot of space behind them for proper performance.  They do a good job but they need space. This is true of most floorstanders but they are particular sensitive in placement. 

Quote

Many experts and in-the-know listeners agree that bipolar speakers are absolutely superior for both music and home theater. Each speaker incorporates two complete sets of drivers, one facing forward and the other facing to the rear. Thus, our bipolar speakers radiate the full sonic spectrum both forward and rearward in an omni-directional pattern, exactly as sound is produced in real life.

From the manual.  Notice it says fullspectrum.  I have found them to be harsh and boomy when placed too close to the wall behind them.  That's all I'm saying.  And yes, to me if they're improperly placed they sound like shit as do most speakers.

Edited by VABuckeye
adding content

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve been working with/owned DefTech for about a decade and I haven’t experienced those issues. Not saying it’s untrue just not anything I’ve ever heard in my time with them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

The frequencies in question on the DefTechs are mostly 1 kHz and above, which implies a half-wavelength round trip of 7 inches to get significant cancellation with the front-firing drivers.

Not according to the manual.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to finish up on speaker placement and I'll close my rant.

The single biggest mistake people make when they install a system is placing the speakers incorrectly.  They jam them back against a wall, in a corner or on a bookshelf.  Speakers need room to breathe and if you want them to perform properly and give a proper soundstage and an accurate reproduction then do some research and place them in the room properly.  Believe it or not, nearly all bookshelf speakers are not made to be put on a bookshelf.

Subwoofer placement.  Put the subwoofer where you'll sit and then move around the room to find the spot on the wall that you want the sub to be on to test for sound.  You're listening for smooth performance and not boomy bass.  Bass will have holes or nulls which is why you can be sitting on a couch and love the sound of the bass while your spouse sitting not two feet away is complaining about the boomy bass.  Subwoofers tend to work best when placed about a third of the way in on a wall.  Corner loading a sub may work very well but experiment with the location.  Placing a subwoofer or speaker in a cabinet is nearly always a bad idea.  First the cabinet will probably rattle and secondly putting a box within a box is not good for accurate sound  Two subs placed correctly in the room will usually smooth out the nulls but of course, the wife acceptance factor may not allow for two subs in the room.

Here's a link to the Dynaudio manual regarding speaker placement.  It is an excellent guide to properly placing speakers.  The placement portion of the manual begins on page 19.  Dynaudio Special Forty Speaker Manual

SVS on subwoofer placement.  Properly placing a subwoofer

Edited by VABuckeye
adding content

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hope this is the right spot for folks to weigh in here. Definitely need some pretty technical advice.

We're putting in a pool. I've got a great spot for a TV - our deck is elevated, and the pool deck will be beneath it (basically a covered patio when you're down by the pool). The TV is going to go up on the side of the house, under the deck - largely weather-shielded, with great sight-lines from the pool and other social spaces. I've got power handled. Two key questions ...

  1. How do I get signal to the TV? (details below)
  2. How do I get sound in the backyard from whatever's on the TV?

General details / notes on the setup around my place ... in no particular order.

  • Google fiber + TV
  • House is wired with Cat6. I have two drops that terminate on an outside wall, although it would be able 50' of conduit to run it over to where I want to put the TV. I don't mind running the conduit.
  • An ideal setup would be some sort of stream, but google fiber app doesn't like to stream to players/sticks/casters (they want you to use their TV Boxes)
  • I still can't figure out sound ... stereo-pairable outdoor bluetooth speakers seem ideal, but how does the source work?

So ... any good ideas? The obvious answer is to get another Google Fiber TV box and put it outside. I can build a plexglass box for it to keep it out of the weather, but even just the hot/cold cycles will wreck that thing. But that might be the best way - curious for other ideas, tho.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/1/2019 at 4:52 PM, VABuckeye said:

From the manual.  Notice it says fullspectrum.  I have found them to be harsh and boomy when placed too close to the wall behind them.  That's all I'm saying.  And yes, to me if they're improperly placed they sound like shit as do most speakers.

Bipole or monopole, both will get "boomy" too close to a wall, unless they were specifically designed to be placed right on the wall (i.e., designed to behave as if they were in an infinite baffle). 

"Harsh" is a tough call in terms of room placement, because it tends to imply some kind of overly-bright response.  To get some sort of additive effect happening the rear-firing tweeter would have to have roughly an integer-wavelength path off the wall and back to combine with the front-firing tweeter at the frequencies in question.  Take 2 kHz, for example.  The wavelength is just under 7 inches.  A rear-firing tweeter isn't likely to interfere constructively with the front-firing tweeter in a single wavelength at that frequency -- the path length difference is too long.  (Back tweeter to wall and back to front tweeter is almost surely more than 7 inches.)  14 inches?  Yeah, it could happen.  At that frequency.  I'm not saying it's not an effect, and I'm not saying that getting them off the back wall wouldn't eventually get the back wave to the point where it's more of an echo than a constructive/destructive interference with the front wave, but it's all pretty room-dependent.  There are plenty of other high frequency reflections going on with any speaker that make them all "room dependent" to some extent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hope this is the right spot for folks to weigh in here. Definitely need some pretty technical advice.
We're putting in a pool. I've got a great spot for a TV - our deck is elevated, and the pool deck will be beneath it (basically a covered patio when you're down by the pool). The TV is going to go up on the side of the house, under the deck - largely weather-shielded, with great sight-lines from the pool and other social spaces. I've got power handled. Two key questions ...
  1. How do I get signal to the TV? (details below)
  2. How do I get sound in the backyard from whatever's on the TV?
General details / notes on the setup around my place ... in no particular order.
  • Google fiber + TV
  • House is wired with Cat6. I have two drops that terminate on an outside wall, although it would be able 50' of conduit to run it over to where I want to put the TV. I don't mind running the conduit.
  • An ideal setup would be some sort of stream, but google fiber app doesn't like to stream to players/sticks/casters (they want you to use their TV Boxes)
  • I still can't figure out sound ... stereo-pairable outdoor bluetooth speakers seem ideal, but how does the source work?
So ... any good ideas? The obvious answer is to get another Google Fiber TV box and put it outside. I can build a plexglass box for it to keep it out of the weather, but even just the hot/cold cycles will wreck that thing. But that might be the best way - curious for other ideas, tho.


Cut the cord and go YouTube TV. Then all you need a is power and a Roku Stick. I had a small tv out by the pool last weekend.

5cde07f00923d68fb4158973e0ba9d20.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last I checked YouTube didn't have ESPN or LHN ... that's a deal breaker. I also am trying to keep things simple enough for my parents to turn on the TV and sound outside, but that might be a pipe dream at this point ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are other streaming services that have LHN. But YTTV definitely has ESPN.

Cutting the cord has been incredibly liberating in terms of TV placement. It’s nice to only need a power outlet and WiFi signal. And you can have as many as you want (and smart TVs are so cheap right now).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding sound: easiest would be a sound bar attached to the TV. But if you’re saying you want more speakers with the TV sound in the backyard then it gets more complicated. There are some companies that make WiFi outdoor speakers (check Amazon). But you still need to run power.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, jimmyjazz said:

Bipole or monopole, both will get "boomy" too close to a wall, unless they were specifically designed to be placed right on the wall (i.e., designed to behave as if they were in an infinite baffle). 

"Harsh" is a tough call in terms of room placement, because it tends to imply some kind of overly-bright response.  To get some sort of additive effect happening the rear-firing tweeter would have to have roughly an integer-wavelength path off the wall and back to combine with the front-firing tweeter at the frequencies in question.  Take 2 kHz, for example.  The wavelength is just under 7 inches.  A rear-firing tweeter isn't likely to interfere constructively with the front-firing tweeter in a single wavelength at that frequency -- the path length difference is too long.  (Back tweeter to wall and back to front tweeter is almost surely more than 7 inches.)  14 inches?  Yeah, it could happen.  At that frequency.  I'm not saying it's not an effect, and I'm not saying that getting them off the back wall wouldn't eventually get the back wave to the point where it's more of an echo than a constructive/destructive interference with the front wave, but it's all pretty room-dependent.  There are plenty of other high frequency reflections going on with any speaker that make them all "room dependent" to some extent.

It's more boomy that concerns me.  Placing a midrange or woofer near a wall and reflecting the sound is more of what I was getting at.  You're right though that harsh would apply to tweeters.  😎

Edited by VABuckeye

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Buzzrock said:

Regarding sound: easiest would be a sound bar attached to the TV. But if you’re saying you want more speakers with the TV sound in the backyard then it gets more complicated. There are some companies that make WiFi outdoor speakers (check Amazon). But you still need to run power.

Yeah, speakers need power one way or the other.  I'd just have speakers arrayed on the fence around the pool (if you have one) pointed back to the house.  Let's face it, it's outside so you aren't looking for hi-fi sound.  Since you have to get a wire to each speaker no matter what I'd run speaker wire from where the amp is located.  Without drawings or some idea of what the space is like and where equipment could be housed it's a little difficult to make suggestions that might work for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Buzzrock said:

Regarding sound: easiest would be a sound bar attached to the TV. But if you’re saying you want more speakers with the TV sound in the backyard then it gets more complicated. There are some companies that make WiFi outdoor speakers (check Amazon). But you still need to run power.

I finally just ditched a bigger setup and run a soundbar with a seperate, powered sub. My hearing is shot from guitar amps, anyway. I'm happy with the setup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm unhappy with my soundbar because it doesn't sound great when playing streaming music from my iphone. So, I'm looking at a stereo receiver setup with speakers. However, I can't run wired speakers to the back of the room, leaving two options. Go with 3.1, or put in wireless 5.1 or 7.1 speakers.

Will I be happy with 3.1 only? Will it automatically map a movie dolby digital signal into the 3 speakers, or do I just have to run the movies in stereo? I assume my current soundbar tries to mimic the 5.1 signal inside the soundbar, but I'm not sure.

Also, I've gone thru 3 soundbars and a previous 5.1 setup because we are old and can't hear the dialogue of movies. If I go back to 3.1, will I be able to hear the dialogue of movies?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run a 3.1 set up in our living room. I don’t really miss the rear speakers and it still decodes from the 4K and blue ray discs.  If your having trouble with clarity of dialogue in 3.1 it’s likely your issue is your center speaker.  All your dialogue comes from there so if you have a bad center then it will be harder to make out the words.  If it’s volume that’s the issue you would need a more efficient speaker, higher power receiver, or both.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/22/2019 at 12:49 PM, Buzzrock said:

There are other streaming services that have LHN. But YTTV definitely has ESPN.

Cutting the cord has been incredibly liberating in terms of TV placement. It’s nice to only need a power outlet and WiFi signal. And you can have as many as you want (and smart TVs are so cheap right now).

Right now I'm thinking you're right. Not ready to cut the cord yet inside, but outside I think streaming to a WiFi enabled TV for the content I want directly is the answer. I can't get the full Google TV feed, but I can stream the golf channel app, ESPN app, etc. Gonna grab an iPad Mini and a lifeProof case. Connect the mini to the TV and to a pair of outdoor rated Bluetooth speakers, job done. I'm not gonna watch Game of Thrones outside, but I will watch football games - this will work for that, and keeps things dead simple. My parents might still struggle with it, but we'll cross that bridge when we get there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So after several weeks, the verdict on the old Acoustimass is that it’s pretty damn solid for movie / TV surround sound and not very good for straight up music listening. Which is fine, I have other plans for music listening. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/1/2019 at 2:27 PM, jimmyjazz said:

Not that I'm a fan of DefTech, I think that team did far better with the GoldenEar line.

I'd argue better at some products (bipolar and active towers) but probably negligible in others, especially subwoofers.  I'm about to take delivery of my DefTech 5.2.4 ATMOS setup and wary of the decision but going with in-walls.  Their UIW RLS II for the front stage, UIW RSS II for rear surrounds and DI 6.5 for height (ceiling).  Their implementation of sealed melanite enclosures and performance/$ caught me.  No idea why they went with open-baffle in-walls on GoldenEar, also multiples more expensive.

Subs will be a pair of SVS PB2000 in opposite corners of the room, just 208 s.f.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I finally broke down and bought some new speakers.
I got The Klipsch 8000F’s.  Sale was about $200 off each speaker.

Fanfuckingtastic.  

I was mostly worried about low end.  No worry, it’s totally enough.  And the highs aren’t harsh at all.

I waited too long.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Rip76 said:

So I finally broke down and bought some new speakers.
I got The Klipsch 8000F’s.  Sale was about $200 off each speaker.

Fanfuckingtastic.  

I was mostly worried about low end.  No worry, it’s totally enough.  And the highs aren’t harsh at all.

I waited too long.

Stereo or surround? How are you powering them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've owned all kinds of very high end amps & preamps, but wanted to condense and simplify a few years ago.  I ended up with a pretty high end Yamaha integrated amp, and I absolutely love it.  Good choice on the receiver.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, jimmyjazz said:

I've owned all kinds of very high end amps & preamps, but wanted to condense and simplify a few years ago.  I ended up with a pretty high end Yamaha integrated amp, and I absolutely love it.  Good choice on the receiver.

Right on.  It’s solid, and a true warm sound.

I wanted a full receiver just to have the radio, etc. option.

Edited by Rip76

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...