Jump to content
cdain3

Texas Basketball Recruiting Notes: Shaka Edition

Recommended Posts

On 4/8/2018 at 3:35 PM, TheBryMan81 said:

PJ Locke retweeted this... Given our shooting proficiency, maybe this is the type of kid we should be going after

They being said, maybe he can't dribble, pass, or play defense. But dude can hit a 3

He didn't get any offers because he shoots like he has a problem with his central nervous system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Catdaddyhorn said:

He didn't get any offers because he shoots like he has a problem with his central nervous system.

Several of the guys on our team give me trouble with my central nervous system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Gut Wagon said:

Which I hope means they'd never play for Shaka at Texas anyway.

Moyer and Tarke are good players. Which is why schools like Florida, Xavier, K-State, Maryland, Georgetown, Texas Tech, Kansas, Nevada, Maryland, Cincinnati, and so on are showing interest. 

Texas needs shooters but it also needs more length at the 3 which both Moyer and Tarke provide. These things aren't mutually exclusive. Texas needs to add more shooters like a Cremo, a really good shooter in the '19 class, and probably another grad transfer next cycle that can shoot. 

I think some are overvaluing the market in terms of "shooters". Shooters are at a premium when it comes to transfers. There's only a couple options. Here's a list of all the transfers available: http://barttorvik.com/playerstat.php?link=y&cvalue=trans&year=2018&minmin=0&top=351&start=20171101&end=20180501

I'm all for Texas going out and signing a bunch of "shooters", but that's not going to happen in terms of transfers. If you look at the list of transfers I posted above there's only a few high volume 3 point shooters that are better than Kerwin Roach for example. Most of those aren't grad transfers either. 

Texas isn't going to completely fix the "shooting" problem through the transfer market because of the limited options. They can improve it with guys like Long and Cremo. The biggest key is for guys like Febres to become good shooters because that's why we recruited them in the first place. IMO Shaka's had a bigger problem with talent evaluation in recruiting than actually neglecting shooting. Guys like Febres and Davis were recruited to be "shooters". 

 

 

Edited by texasstrong12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I probably didn’t phrase that well. My point is that I hope no one playing for Texas in 2019-20 will be playing  for Shaka Smart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Gut Wagon said:

I probably didn’t phrase that well. My point is that I hope no one playing for Texas in 2019-20 will be playing  for Shaka Smart.

You're going to be disappointed. 

Texas will still owe Shaka $12.9 million if they fire him after next year. That doesn't even include buyouts for our next coach. Texas isn't going to spend $15 to $20 million to fire a coach unless they are complete disasters. Not to mention CDC seems to be clearly in Shaka's corner unlike other coaches that are on the hot seat like Connie Clark. 

I put the chances of Shaka being fired after next year under 10%. Maybe that will change if next year's season is a complete disaster. 

Edited by texasstrong12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I expect to be disappointed. Regardless, I can’t hope for a disaster of a season. Then again, hoping this guy gets it together sure hasn’t worked very well to date. Patterson was an idiot, but not the only one with a hand in this mess. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/12/2018 at 12:51 PM, Auto Driller said:

Let’s just add a couple Dogus Balbay types and we’ll be good to go.

Well if we’re going this route then I’ll need a Demarcus Holland or two as well.

Edited by Goo Punch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Goo Punch said:

Well if we’re going thisbriute then I’ll need a Demarcus Holland or two as well.

Don't forget a handful of Danny Newsomes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some recruiting info from OBs

Friday afternoon, the Longhorns will conduct an in-home visit with 2019 five-star guard Tyrese Maxey (South Garland). The nation’s No. 12 prospect, who has visited Texas in the past, is also expected to host Michigan State, Michigan, and Kentucky. Here’s the wrinkle: there’s buzz building that Maxey is contemplating a move into the 2018 class. And although Kentucky sounds like the leader and is pushing for the move, despite Ashton Hagans’s likely move into the 2018 class to make the Kentucky backcourt even more crowded than it already is, the Longhorns are in the picture, and have a shot. 

If Maxey does decide to move into the 2018 class, Texas has a lot of playing time to offer, and an ideal spot playing alongside point guard Matt Coleman. Meanwhile, Kentucky would have Immanuel Quickley, Quade Green, Hagans, Tyler Herro, Keldon Johnson, and Jemarl Baker all competing for minutes at guard. Although Hamidou Diallo is expected to turn pro, it’s not a lock, and he too could be in the guard mix. That’s a lot of guards, but it hasn’t stopped John Calipari before. 


After this round of in-home visits, it’ll be worth following the conversation that emerges. (McComas)

****


Albany graduate transfer Joe Cremo has a final five of Creighton, Oregon, Gonzaga, Penn State, and Texas, he confirmed to OB today. Cremo said the schools are in no order, and the only visit he has locked-in currently is this weekend to Creighton. (McComas)

****

Another recruiting tidbit to pass along: the Texas football and basketball coaches have been in communication about recruiting 2019 Lake Travis standout Garrett Wilson. The local product is good enough to play basketball at the high-major level. (McComas)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎4‎/‎8‎/‎2018 at 3:35 PM, TheBryMan81 said:

PJ Locke retweeted this... Given our shooting proficiency, maybe this is the type of kid we should be going after

They being said, maybe he can't dribble, pass, or play defense. But dude can hit a 3

And he shot 39% for his NAIA school...

www.reinhardteagles.com/roster.aspx?rp_id=4665&path=mbball

Edited by Beau Vine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

theathletic.com:

Quote

Small-town America evokes images of courthouse squares, houses fronted by white picket fences, backyards with swing sets, the burgs accessible on two-lane roads dividing verdant fields of crops.

And then there is Barrow, Alaska, a town of 4,400 that is unique for a variety of reasons. It’s known as both Barrow and by the recent change to the native name of Utqiagvik. The northernmost dot on the U.S. map, the most-isolated town in the country and the 11th northernmost public community in the world, Barrow is surrounded on three sides by the Arctic Ocean. It is 730 miles from Anchorage, 4,250 miles from Miami and 3,360 miles from Moscow … Russia, not Idaho.

You can get there only by plane. The frozen tundra precludes pavement. Barrow enjoys the benefits of the modern world mixed with a culture that dates back thousands of years. The residents rely on a mixed cash-subsistence economy with some food and supplies arriving by air shipment. Each spring, whale-hunting boats break paths through the ice, and successful hunts lead to blanket-toss celebrations with everyone sharing in the spoils of the hunt.

There is, quite frankly, no place in America more unlikely to be the hometown of a four-star basketball player.

Well, say hello to Kamaka Hepa, a 6-9 forward who is ranked as the 49th-best player in the country by 247Sports.com. He is also one of four players in a 2018 recruiting class at Texas that is ranked 13th nationally.

“He can really shoot,” Longhorns coach Shaka Smart says. “One thing he's really good at it is catching, putting it on the floor and then making plays. He makes his teammates better. We're always looking for versatility. When you have a guy of his height, you can play him at multiple positions; combined with his IQ, it gives you a lot of flexibility. He's also a great kid, very bright, terrific energy and vibe that we're excited about adding to our culture.”

Hepa’s mother, Taqulik, was born and raised in Barrow and is a member of the Inupiaq, commonly known as Eskimos. While there have been dozens of Division I players from Alaska, Hepa is believed to be the first of Inupiaq heritage who will play at college basketball’s highest level.

“There have been decent players of that heritage but not many who have made it out of Alaska or to a high level in college,” Kamaka says. “For me, being one of the first to do that, I take a bunch of pride in that. That's the culture I was raised in. My mom and her grandmother have made sure me and my siblings experience the heritage. People in Barrow have to work hard to survive, and basketball is small in comparison to that.”

Hepa’s heritage and his hometown are part of an intriguing backstory. His potential is such that he can become a unique combination, a stretch 4 and a point forward with the court sense and the feel to lift his teammates. Despite playing in isolation – middle school and high school games require traveling by plane for Barrow teams and their opponents – Hepa developed into a promising prospect. But to hone that potential, the Hepas had to leave the outpost they call home.


During the two months of polar night, the sun doesn’t shine on Barrow, which explains why hoops is a popular sport.

“Basketball is a community sport,” says Roland Hepa, Kamaka’s father. “It brings us together. There are a lot of family values that we stress to our kids. It's our day-to-day life, being together as a community.”

Students in Barrow matriculate through one elementary, one middle and one high school, so Hepa’s classmates are his close friends. He was always the tallest kid in his class, always standing in the back for pictures, always being looked up to. “At first it was awkward being the tallest kid, but basketball gave me a place to feel comfortable,” Hepa says. “I never felt out of place on the court. And being different sometimes isn't as bad as it seems.”

Roland is from Hawaii (his migration from tropical paradise to arctic isolation feels like reverse engineering), and he played numerous sports growing up. In second grade, Kamaka played basketball on a team coached by his father. Instead of putting the tallest kid – his son – under the basket, Roland made sure every player worked on fundamentals. Kamaka says he “learned the game as a player, not as a position.”

“We started our own youth (basketball program) with about seven or eight kids,” Roland says. “Some of the parents got together, and we started flying to Fairbanks and Anchorage to play better competition. Kamaka learned early that he had to work hard to get better. I did a lot of research, and we focused on fundamentals – shooting form, dribbling, passing. We stressed it in practice. Every kid gets better doing those things.”

As a sixth grader, Kamaka was invited to a showcase camp in Tennessee. Roland says his son’s height and skills impressed the camp directors. “Our goal was that maybe the exposure would help him get a chance at a scholarship and a free college education,” Roland says.

Kamaka kept growing, and by middle school the townspeople were talking about an elusive goal – Barrow’s first high school state championship. When Kamaka began his freshman year, his height and talents turned the talk into expectation.

Kamaka and his cousin, guard Travis Adams, led the Whalers to a 50-40 victory over two-time defending champion Monroe Catholic to win the 2015 Class 3A state championship. Barrow repeated the following season.

“For me, at times, it got kind of stressful,” Hepa says of his freshman season. “It felt we had the whole community depending on us. But they were supporting us all the way, win or lose. Bringing back the first one, that's a memory I'll never forget.”


As Kamaka blossomed on the basketball court, his older brother, Kawika, pestered him about leaving Barrow to pursue better competition and training. Then in November 2015, just before Kamaka’s sophomore season, Kawika, 29, was shot and killed as a bystander in a domestic dispute in Anchorage.

“That was a difficult time,” Kamaka says. “It was incredibly tough on my parents. I lost somebody who was really important to me. He had always challenged me to be better. He knew I was having success in Alaska, but I needed better competition and to gain more exposure. When he died, part of me knew I had to honor what he wanted for me.”

Reggie Walker of the Portland Basketball Club AAU team had gotten word that a unicorn was roaming in the Alaska wilderness. He contacted Roland about the possibility of the Hepas moving to Portland. The Hepas had been researching options, including Findlay Prep in Las Vegas, Mater Dei in the Los Angeles area and Montverde Academy in Florida. Kamaka felt comfortable in Portland.

“We thought with him he would elevate what we thought was a pretty good team,” Walker says. “Kamaka had all the intangibles you want in a player of that caliber. When the coach would talk to the team, he was locked in, hyper-focused. From the first time I talked to him, he was very mature, very serious and wanted to maximize his experience of a new place plus help his chances of playing high-level Division I. This was a step he felt he needed to take.”

Hepa joined the team in the summer before his junior year, about the time PBC was going to make its debut in Nike’s EYBL circuit. In its first game in the 16-and-under division, the team was playing in New Jersey. When the point guard got in foul trouble, Hepa took over as point forward. Texas assistant coach Darrin Horn happened to be on hand. “I thought, Man, that kid is really skilled,” Horn says. “I saw him handling the ball and making passes that kids his size and his age just don't make.”

Upon moving to Portland, Hepa also enrolled at Jefferson High School, a prep powerhouse. In 2016-17, with Hepa in his junior season, the school moved up to the biggest classification – and won its ninth state title.

“Along with his makeup as a person, the winning was the most attractive quality about Kamaka,” Smart says. “If you talk to the guys paid to do scouting at the highest level, one common denominator they talk about and look for is: Does his team win?”

Kamaka and his parents each made their own evaluation of the Texas recruiting pitch. The collective vote was 3-0 for the Longhorns over Gonzaga. Selecting a school that had just finished 11-22 over one that had lost in the national championship game speaks volumes about Smart’s closing ability. He’s Mariano Rivera when he gets in a recruit’s living room with the parents.

“When Shaka Smart gets locked in like he was on Kamaka, it's hard for any other head coach to counter that,” Horn says. “His message to Kamaka was, ‘All you've ever done is help teams do something they've never done before. Texas has been to the final Four and had success, but we'd like to take the ultimate step and win a national title. If you want to be a part of that, this is the place for you.’ That resonated with Kamaka.”

During his time in Portland, Hepa took advantage of facilities not available in Barrow. He became a workout warrior, adding bulk to his 200-pound frame. When he started training in Portland, he typically wore long sleeves to hide his skinny arms. Now his guns are on display thanks to short-sleeve or sleeveless shirts.

“On the court he's become more aggressive because he's more confident thanks to the work he's put in,” Walker says. “He’s trying to be the hammer, not the nail.”

The Portland Basketball Club sends a newsletter to Division I programs about its players. Walker recalls getting skeptical responses from numerous high-level schools. Horn also heard other coaches doubting Hepa’s ability to play D-I.

“A lot of people got caught up in measurables — he doesn't touch the top of the square; he's not as athletic as some guys,” Horn says. “But if you watch him move as a basketball player, the kid's terrific. That's what we really liked about him. We love how he moves as a basketball player. We feel like you can run the offense through him; if he's touching the ball your offense is better. We think he can be a high-level impact player.”

The day after Jefferson lost in the state championship game – denying Hepa a fourth consecutive title – he moved back to Barrow so he could graduate with his hometown friends. Much was made of that decision and provided ammunition to those who looked at Kamaka as a basketball carpetbagger.

“It was always our plan to spend two years in Portland,” Roland says. “We originally thought he’d be here for his sophomore and junior seasons and then return to Barrow for his senior season. People are going to have their opinions.”

The recent FBI investigation into college basketball has cast the spotlight on the relationship between schools, shoe companies and agents. The Hepas’ move to Portland attracted the attention of The Oregonian. The newspaper was asking questions about the Portland Basketball Club, which is sponsored by Nike. After being stonewalled by Walker and Nike representatives, the newspaper approached the Hepas, who declined to be interviewed. Issues were also raised about Kamaka’s high school eligibility, as there were questions about Taqulik’s residency. The family was cleared.

“It’s the nature of the beast,” Roland says. “There are going to be positive stories and negative stories. And we looked at several other opportunities. Kamaka thought Portland was the best fit and closest to home. He felt comfortable here.”

Texas has no concerns about Hepa’s NCAA eligibility, and the coaching staff expects him and the other three signees in the 2018 class to be on campus in early June for the start of summer classes and workouts.


Kamaka Hepa is a product of his environment. Growing up in an isolated community and playing a sport that relies on teamwork has presented him the opportunity to pursue college education in one of the most eclectic and dynamic cities in the country.

“I've gained attention from playing basketball,” he says, “and a lot of the attention I get is because of where I come from, growing up in such a small village, away from everything. It makes me different, but that has also helped me get to where I am.”

The high temperature in Barrow during the summer is around 50 degrees. That’s sweater weather in Austin. His official visit came during UT’s football season opener last season on a day when the thermometer hit 94. He prefers snow over rain, but it snows in Austin as often as a Democrat is elected governor. Hepa says he’s looking forward to a different climate. “I’ve never been in an area where the winters are warm,” he says.

The UT admission process requires prospective students to submit an essay about their background and reasons for seeking admittance. Hepa’s submission was his life story.

“One of the perks of having such a tight-knit, small community is experiencing the support of everyone in the town,” says Hepa, a 4.0 student who is interested in pursuing a degree in business or engineering. “It's important to me because I know that no matter what I choose to do in life, I have an entire community there for me and supporting me, regardless of what I do in basketball. I want to do as much as I can to put Barrow on the map for future generations.”

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/14/2018 at 10:21 AM, Beau Vine said:

Didn't SMU hire Maxey's dad?

I believe so, or some close family member.   Kid is good.

Edited by bularry1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Revolution512 said:

Looks like Hayes got a nice bump from ESPN. Cunningham took a tumble

I didn’t know Cunningham had enough room to “take a tumble”. And yeah, I saw Hayes posting on his IG that he’s up to 87th nationally iirc? Probably a more accurate ranking of where he is now compared to a year ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple notes from IT:

Quote

Something @Groundhog Day alluded to yesterday was the pursuit of ‘19 Westlake 5* center Will Baker. 

Six months ago, I’d have said Texas has a very small shot at the 7-foot southpaw version of Nick Collison. But they’ve slowly made up ground to the point Baker is strongly considering Texas. They’re battling some of the blue bloods - UNC, Duke, UCLA - but the proximity and UT’s recent success in putting bigs directly into the NBA is enticing. The Bakers are noticing. 

University of Albany grad transfer Joe Cremo will visit the Longhorns this weekend as he tries to finalize his plans for his senior season.

Cremo, a 6-foot-4 combo guard from New York, has already visited Creighton and could take two other visits beyond his trip to Austin.

When Cremo announced his intentions to transfer to a larger institution for his senior year, UT head coach Shaka Smart hopped on a plane to visit him within the week. That interest made a big impression on Cremo and has the Longhorns in as good a spot as anybody at this point.

With the uncertainty surrounding the program (Roach’s impending pro decision; Jones’ health; questions about the Ramey recruitment), potentially landing Cremo could be a program altering get for a season that looks more and more like a make or break season for Shaka.

Profile of Cremo as a player:

Lights out shooter (46% from three; 82% from the free throw line) even as a high volume player
Legitimate combo threat as a passer and playmaker
Led his team in free throw attempts
Led his conference in offensive efficiency
Second in his conference in assist rate

If they can land him, Cremo would be a huge get.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, texasstrong12 said:

Starting to think we are going to land Ramey.  A Louisville mod CB'ed Ramey to Texas on Tuesday. 

 

Louisville doesn't seem confident at all, although apparently the Ramey's want to talk to Mack again before deciding 

Okie State just landed a grad transfer PG, which could deter him from going there, or at the very least put them on even ground with the other schools that have point guards

Some Kansas mod said he was hearing Mizzou from "Texas people" this weekend at the Dallas AAU event, although I'm not sure if he meant UT staff, Texas writers, or state of Texas AAU people, or something else by that. 

Way too much drama for a 40th ranked player 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Fud said:

Way too much drama for a 40th ranked player 

Drama or just a bunch of recruiting people making guesses? 

From what I've seen, Ramey and his father have been anything but drama. They can't help that people speculate. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, texasstrong12 said:

Drama or just a bunch of recruiting people making guesses? 

From what I've seen, Ramey and his father have been anything but drama. They can't help that people speculate. 

I didn't mean drama here. Mostly on the basketball board where I'm following this where Missouri, Louisville, and Illinois fans have been at each others throats about this recruitment for awhile now 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Fud said:

I didn't mean drama here. Mostly on the basketball board where I'm following this where Missouri, Louisville, and Illinois fans have been at each others throats about this recruitment for awhile now 

Yeah, this is a heated recruitment because he's from their backyard. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Word out of Louisville is that Ramey is expected to commit to Texas tomorrow 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Bevo said:

Shaka can recruit. I just wish he could coach.

It really is amazing to see these kids come here and then leave in 2 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/12/2018 at 10:43 PM, texasstrong12 said:

You're going to be disappointed. 

Texas will still owe Shaka $12.9 million if they fire him after next year. That doesn't even include buyouts for our next coach. Texas isn't going to spend $15 to $20 million to fire a coach unless they are complete disasters. Not to mention CDC seems to be clearly in Shaka's corner unlike other coaches that are on the hot seat like Connie Clark. 

I put the chances of Shaka being fired after next year under 10%. Maybe that will change if next year's season is a complete disaster. 

What is the latest on the pg who was going to reclassify for the 18' class?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, utfan87 said:

What is the latest on the pg who was going to reclassify for the 18' class?

Hasn't decided if he's going to reclassify, yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, RockyMountainHighHorn said:

I'm guessing that means cremo is out of the picture?

Why Cremo is a SG, Ramey is a PG. Scholarships are no longer an issue after losing Bamba, Roach, Davis, Young, and Banks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, HtownHorn said:

Why Cremo is a SG, Ramey is a PG. Scholarships are no longer an issue after losing Bamba, Roach, Davis, Young, and Banks.

Roach will be back 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we had room for a grad transfer and Ramey.  Cremo is who we desperately need. Ramey will probably need a year before he's ready for big minutes and I'm not comfortable projecting a mediocre high school FT shooter to being a plus overall shooter in college.  I fear Ramey may become another in our long line of guards who can't shoot from outside or make free throws.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Osetkowski, Long, Roach, Coleman, Febres, Sims, Hamm, Liddell, Cunningham, Hayes, and Hepa. 11 scholarship players. 

2 scholarships available not counting Jones. 3 if Roach isn't back. 

 

Edited by texasstrong12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, utfan87 said:

What is the latest on the pg who was going to reclassify for the 18' class?

https://247sports.com/Player/Tyrese-Maxey-94195

Maxey. He hasn't reclassified yet. 

A lot of people think he's a lock to Kentucky but people are drastically undervaluing Texas in that recruitment. Maxey's family is really close with Jai Lucas.  If Maxey doesn't reclassify, I won't be surprised at all if he picks Texas in the '19 cycle. 

Edited by texasstrong12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, texasstrong12 said:

https://247sports.com/Player/Tyrese-Maxey-94195

Maxey. He hasn't reclassified yet. 

A lot of people think he's a lock to Kentucky but people are drastically undervaluing Texas in that recruitment. Maxey's family is really close with Jai Lucas.  If Maxey doesn't reclassify, I won't be surprised at all if he picks Texas in the '19 cycle. 

Word is it's pretty much a done deal. Kentucky guaranteed him a starting spot if he did it 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Fud said:

Word is it's pretty much a done deal. Kentucky guaranteed him a starting spot if he did it 

We'll see. Kentucky is trying to get Ashton Hagans to reclassify (#1 PG in the '19 class). 

I'm not sure why Kentucky would want both Hagans and Maxey to reclassify. Not sure why Maxey would think he would be guaranteed a starting spot either if Hagans reclassifies. 

There's also talk that they are trying to get Jalen Lecque to reclassify. Plus it looks like Quade Green isn't transferring. Kentucky doesn't need a billion guards. 

Edited by texasstrong12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, Mizzou was the major competition for Ramey IMO and they took a transfer PG earlier today which would indicate Ramey let them know he was going elsewhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Didn't read other comments about him but he's got an interesting jumper.  Really two different shots.  He's got a quick release set shot he uses when he's guarded and a more conventional elbow-extended one.  Also, from the highlights, he's going to need to learn to go to his left.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...