Jump to content
Longhorn Al

Downtown Projects

Recommended Posts

Parsley Energy might have some office space to lease when their new building on Colorado finishes up...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't count on it.  Their leverage profile looks okay (not good, but not awful), and they're conveniently getting into the wind business on top of their mineral packages.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crane base installed at 6x:

6x Guadalupe

 

Hanover Republic Square:

Hanover Republic Square

 

I can confirm as of today there appears to be no slowdown at any of the construction sites I've seen downtown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, the developers I checked in with this week are all full-steam ahead on a handful of projects in Central Austin.  Don't know how long that will last, but.  

Said there were a few crews that were a few guys short, but nothing beyond some nominal delays. One guy brought up a good point, he is the head of one of the larger construction companies in Texas.  Everyone would know his company name.  Said a lot of these guys are gonna work until it becomes 100% illegal to be seen at a job site.  Come hell or high water, they're gonna keep getting a check and doing a good job.  But they all worry that (no/CR, but fuck off if you don't see the logic here) Trump is gonna start vilifying construction sites for spreading the virus because (dog whistle alert), it's one of the last en masse gatherings of manual labor allowed.  Meanwhile manufacturing plants are allowed to keep up and running despite them being in even closer quarters than open air construction sites.  But the people that make buildings are Hispanic.  And people that ship bottled water aren't.  NoCR, and fuck off if you don't see his point.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stupid, just like the closed golf courses. 
if people are still “allowed” to walk outside in parks, trails & around their neighborhoods as long as they SD, what’s the difference with being outside on a course or a construction site?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/20/2020 at 10:33 AM, Lobo said:

Yeah, the developers I checked in with this week are all full-steam ahead on a handful of projects in Central Austin.  Don't know how long that will last, but.  

Said there were a few crews that were a few guys short, but nothing beyond some nominal delays. One guy brought up a good point, he is the head of one of the larger construction companies in Texas.  Everyone would know his company name.  Said a lot of these guys are gonna work until it becomes 100% illegal to be seen at a job site.  Come hell or high water, they're gonna keep getting a check and doing a good job.  But they all worry that (no/CR, but fuck off if you don't see the logic here) Trump is gonna start vilifying construction sites for spreading the virus because (dog whistle alert), it's one of the last en masse gatherings of manual labor allowed.  Meanwhile manufacturing plants are allowed to keep up and running despite them being in even closer quarters than open air construction sites.  But the people that make buildings are Hispanic.  And people that ship bottled water aren't.  NoCR, and fuck off if you don't see his point.  

nm

Edited by ImissWallyPryor
Dammit, I fell for it. Sorry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, I need to amend my statement regarding construction stopping.

I'm not sure what's going on now.  It looks like some projects haven't stopped working, but  appear to not have as many workers on site.

Are they just limiting the number of workers per jobsite?  I don't know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Somnio said:

Okay, I need to amend my statement regarding construction stopping.

I'm not sure what's going on now.  It looks like some projects haven't stopped working, but  appear to not have as many workers on site.

Are they just limiting the number of workers per jobsite?  I don't know.

Yesterday the City of Austin issued an advisory clarifying its SIP order and stating that commercial and residential projects are generally subject to the order, and only enumerated exceptions are permitted.  The language of the SIP order allowing construction reads as follows:

“Construction, including public works construction, and construction of affordable housing or housing for individuals experiencing homelessness, social services construction, and other construction that supports essential uses, including essential businesses, government functions, or critical infrastructure, or otherwise as required in response to this public health emergency.”

Many lawyers and construction trade groups read that language broadly, as on its face it permits construction in general, followed by an arguably nonexhaustive list of construction projects.  In response, the City has said in effect, "No really, we mean only those projects enumerated in the order can proceed."  As a result, many commercial and residential construction projects are halted under the SIP order, although the City is giving contractors and project owners a few days grace to wrap up their work.

But questions still remain.  Can construction of residential subdivisions proceed at least in part if that construction involves installation of roads and utilities that could be "critical infrastructure"?  The City's advisory raises many other questions and shows just what a mess we're dealing with.  And the impacts are huge.  In addition to halting so many construction projects across the City, whenever the SIP order is lifted can you imaging the burdens contractors and project owners will face in having to re-mobilize subcontractors and trades who have scattered?  That will take on several more weeks of indefinite delays in resuming work. 

I expect growing pressure from the construction industry explaining just how devastating it would be to shut down most commercial and residential projects will cause the City to further amend or clarify the SIP order. 

Sorry I can't find the advisory online.  A law partner forwarded a pdf copy of it to me late yesterday, and this Luddite can't figure out how to paste an image of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, South Austin said:

Yesterday the City of Austin issued an advisory clarifying its SIP order and stating that commercial and residential projects are generally subject to the order, and only enumerated exceptions are permitted.  The language of the SIP order allowing construction reads as follows:

“Construction, including public works construction, and construction of affordable housing or housing for individuals experiencing homelessness, social services construction, and other construction that supports essential uses, including essential businesses, government functions, or critical infrastructure, or otherwise as required in response to this public health emergency.”

Many lawyers and construction trade groups read that language broadly, as on its face it permits construction in general, followed by an arguably nonexhaustive list of construction projects.  In response, the City has said in effect, "No really, we mean only those projects enumerated in the order can proceed."  As a result, many commercial and residential construction projects are halted under the SIP order, although the City is giving contractors and project owners a few days grace to wrap up their work.

But questions still remain.  Can construction of residential subdivisions proceed at least in part if that construction involves installation of roads and utilities that could be "critical infrastructure"?  The City's advisory raises many other questions and shows just what a mess we're dealing with.  And the impacts are huge.  In addition to halting so many construction projects across the City, whenever the SIP order is lifted can you imaging the burdens contractors and project owners will face in having to re-mobilize subcontractors and trades who have scattered?  That will take on several more weeks of indefinite delays in resuming work. 

I expect growing pressure from the construction industry explaining just how devastating it would be to shut down most commercial and residential projects will cause the City to further amend or clarify the SIP order. 

Sorry I can't find the advisory online.  A law partner forwarded a pdf copy of it to me late yesterday, and this Luddite can't figure out how to paste an image of it.

Yeah.  This was pretty much my read on the initial advisory.

I think there need to be a longer grace period or some case by case allowances.

For example, my concrete construction firm is working on a small condo project in east Austin with 17 foundations.  We are scheduled to pour 6 foundations on Monday, but that may get moved to Wednesday due to other trades need to to come in and do final work and be inspected before we pour.  We also have beams opened up on all the other foundations and those need to get poured as well.  The site is about an acre and we have about 8 people on site and they generally work more than 6' apart.

This is especially bothersome because Hays and Williamson Cos have no such restrictions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/25/2020 at 7:46 AM, Armybrat said:

Stupid, just like the closed golf courses. 
if people are still “allowed” to walk outside in parks, trails & around their neighborhoods as long as they SD, what’s the difference with being outside on a course or a construction site?

Probably that golf is nominally social (groups of 2-4, riding around in carts, etc.) and, more likely, they don't want to staff the courses.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Jiggy-Z said:

Yeah.  This was pretty much my read on the initial advisory.

I think there need to be a longer grace period or some case by case allowances.

For example, my concrete construction firm is working on a small condo project in east Austin with 17 foundations.  We are scheduled to pour 6 foundations on Monday, but that may get moved to Wednesday due to other trades need to to come in and do final work and be inspected before we pour.  We also have beams opened up on all the other foundations and those need to get poured as well.  The site is about an acre and we have about 8 people on site and they generally work more than 6' apart.

This is especially bothersome because Hays and Williamson Cos have no such restrictions.

Williamson does, because a big chunk of the southern part of the county is in Austin’s City limits.

This has to affect the 122 acre Apple campus on north Parmer and some huge apartment complexes in the Lakeline area for example.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Austin public courses are still open for walking, first come first serve. I walked Lions yesterday.
Are they all open like that? Might need to get out and play

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LonghornSean said:

Austin public courses are still open for walking, first come first serve. I walked Lions yesterday.

you mean JUST walking or play the course but no cart?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, I believe all the Austin muni courses are open for walking golf. No amenities, no flagsticks. And totally free.

 

2 hours ago, Updawg said:

How crowded was the course?

When I went to Lions around noon or so yesterday, there were people around the course but mostly twos and singles.  When I got there a twosome was teeing off and I started just after them so didn't really have to wait, other than them playing slow. I only the played the front 9, but when I got done 1:30ish it seemed a bit busier, some groups were lined up at #1 and saw another group start at #10 to avoid waiting.

Lions was well maintained too and there were people tending the course.  I went to Mo Willie on Monday or Tuesday and the course was in rough shape, greens were brutal with weeds and stuff.  Was pretty wet from rain though too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yesterday the City of Austin issued an advisory clarifying its SIP order and stating that commercial and residential projects are generally subject to the order, and only enumerated exceptions are permitted.  The language of the SIP order allowing construction reads as follows:
“Construction, including public works construction, and construction of affordable housing or housing for individuals experiencing homelessness, social services construction, and other construction that supports essential uses, including essential businesses, government functions, or critical infrastructure, or otherwise as required in response to this public health emergency.”
Many lawyers and construction trade groups read that language broadly, as on its face it permits construction in general, followed by an arguably nonexhaustive list of construction projects.  In response, the City has said in effect, "No really, we mean only those projects enumerated in the order can proceed."  As a result, many commercial and residential construction projects are halted under the SIP order, although the City is giving contractors and project owners a few days grace to wrap up their work.
But questions still remain.  Can construction of residential subdivisions proceed at least in part if that construction involves installation of roads and utilities that could be "critical infrastructure"?  The City's advisory raises many other questions and shows just what a mess we're dealing with.  And the impacts are huge.  In addition to halting so many construction projects across the City, whenever the SIP order is lifted can you imaging the burdens contractors and project owners will face in having to re-mobilize subcontractors and trades who have scattered?  That will take on several more weeks of indefinite delays in resuming work. 
I expect growing pressure from the construction industry explaining just how devastating it would be to shut down most commercial and residential projects will cause the City to further amend or clarify the SIP order. 
Sorry I can't find the advisory online.  A law partner forwarded a pdf copy of it to me late yesterday, and this Luddite can't figure out how to paste an image of it.


I received this from the Texas Construction Association yesterday:

https://t.congressweb.com/w/?PKKQAISMPN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...