Jump to content
G650

2019 Pro Cycling: Valverde's Magical Mystery Tour of Spain and Italy (but not France)

Recommended Posts

Yeah, I'm officially an Alaphilippe fan now. Not sure how the dude can sit in the saddle with balls that big.

Enjoying Pinot, as well. Seems part asshole, part beast.

Guess I'm #teamfrance. Never thought I'd ever say that.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Braff Zacklin said:

Yeah, I'm officially an Alaphilippe fan now. Not sure how the dude can sit in the saddle with balls that big. Enjoying Pinot, as well. Seems part asshole, part beast.

Guess I'm #teamfrance. Never thought I'd ever say that.

My P.E. coach from when I was young just passed away at the start of this month and his obit would have had you saying "#teamfrance" before this tour even started. Napoleon would have taken Russia with a few more soldiers like Daniel Paul Mathurin Nevot. It's a pretty ridiculous read.

Obituary for Daniel Paul Mathurin Nevot

Daniel-Nevot-1562490460.jpg

FORT WORTH - Daniel Paul Mathurin Nevot was born on April 26, 1920 at Les Bordes-Aumont, near Troyes in east central France. He was the fourth of eight children in a working class family. The family moved to Fontaine-les-Gres, near Nancy, when he was still a child. 

After contracting a life-threatening case of pneumonia and pleurisy when he was 16 years old, Nevot was sent to a sanitarium. He recovered, but the sanitarium then made him an unpaid orderly--a sort of indentured servant. He ran away to Nancy and found work as a dishwasher and then as a waiter and bartender. 

Nevot joined the French army as a volunteer on Oct. 25, 1938. His extraordinary World War II biography includes the Croix de Guerre with a bronze star, silver star, gold star and two bronze palms, the Medaille Militaire (1945), and the Legion d'Honneur (chevalier, 1999; officier, 2010). The Legion d'Honneur is the French equivalent of the Congressional Medal of Honor. It can be awarded only by vote of the French government. 

Nevot's service in WWII included a heroic action in northern Norway (May - June, 1940) with the French Foreign Legion in which he was the sole survivor among 30 other volunteers and a second harrowing escape from the Wehrmacht at Brest, France in June, 1940, after which he arrived in southern England aboard a British destroyer. 

At a famous meeting in 1940 at the Imperial Hotel in London, Nevot and other French military refugees volunteered to serve with the Free French under DeGaulle. Those who volunteered were then taken to the London YMCA formally to sign up. Nevot was the 184th signatory. When asked how he felt about continuing to fight, Nevot simply said, "I didn't surrender." 

He was next sent to Africa with the Free French, to the only French province in Africa that declared for DeGaulle instead of Vichy. After going up the Congo River and marching hundreds of miles through the jungle to Fr. Lamy (now N'Djamena, Chad), he fought at Koufra in southern Libya, the very first WWII battle won by the French in North Africa. In that battle, 250 French combatants and 150 native African irregulars in support traveled through 1,000 miles of desert on commandeered vehicles to capture a well-supplied Italian fort, its airfield, and 300 prisoners. Inside Koufra, Nevot personally heard Leclerc's Serment de Koufra. In that famous speech, Leclerc promised that the French would continue fighting until all Germans were expelled from French Africa and from all of France herself until the tricoleur was raised over the Cathedral in Strasbourg, in the northeastern corner of France. 

The full name of the North African military unit created and trained by Leclerc was called the Regiment du Marche du Tschad (March of Chad Regiment). It was possibly the most famous French regiment of WWII. Nevot was its last survivor from the Battle of Koufra.

In the next winter's campaign, Nevot captured (with only two other soldiers) another Italian fort at El Gatroun, Libya. In the latter action, the three Frenchmen captured not only the fort itself but also its payroll, supplies and approximately 100 prisoners. In later recounting this to his biographers, Mr. Nevot added, "We also captured their wine."

As more Frenchmen from Vichy joined DeGaulle, Leclerc created a larger N. African unit called "Force L." Force L guarded U.S. Gen. Patton's left (desert) flank during the latter portion of the North African campaign.

After the Germans were finally expelled from North Africa in 1943, Nevot and the other Force L survivors were sent to England, where they were further trained by Leclerc and formed into the Second Armored Division. They landed at Normandy two months after D Day, on August 6, 1945. They fought several desperate actions in northern France. They lost seventeen percent of the division in their first battle. 

Nevot rode his motorcycle at the head of a column during the liberation of Paris, which DeGaulle accomplished by directly disobeying orders from senior Allied generals. After Paris, Nevot personally liberated, by himself, his home village of Fontaine-les-Gres in east central France. The Germans had just left. It was the first time his family had seen him in five years. Before his arrival, they did not know he was still alive. 

Nevot continued to fight with the Second Armored Division until the latter reached Strasbourg in the spring of 1945. He was personally present with Leclerc when the tricoleur was raised over the Cathedral in Strasbourg, in fulfillment of Leclerc's Serment de Koufra. He could never recount that event without emotion.

After Strasbourg, Nevot and about 200 other elite French troops were sent on a reckless dash into the Bavarian Alps, to Hitler's "Eagle's Nest," in an audacious attempt to capture Hitler. They were the first Allied troops to arrive. However, the eyrie was abandoned when they arrived--Hitler had stayed in Berlin.

After World War II, Nevot was sent to the Ecole Militaire at Antibes, France's reorganized military college for NCOs. In addition to his academic subjects, he learned judo, fencing and swimming, including the use of a so-called aqualung being perfected by one of his instructors, Jacques Cousteau. Nevot graduated second in his class at Antibes and spent most of his remaining years of army service at various postings in Africa. As the senior NCO (Adjutant-Chef) on every base, he was usually in charge of the men's physical fitness and morale, of keeping them in fighting condition, and of the security detail protecting the senior officer. 

During his African service, Nevot won, in 1951, the French combined armed forces world judo championship--a tournament with no weight classes requiring him to win 20 consecutive bouts. During his African service he also became an upper level "Master" (Maitre) of fencing. 

Nevot came to Texas in 1963 after 25 years in the French army and commenced his 24-year career at St. Mark's in 1964. His St. Mark's fencers had many successful results in regional and national tournaments, including the Junior Olympics (under 16 and under 20 age divisions). Three later became NCAA All-Americans.

Nevot married his first love, Anne-Marie Morville, on May 1, 1946. She worked in the St. Mark's cafeteria for some years to supplement his coach's pay. Anne-Marie, whom he called "Mary Ann" after they moved to Texas, died in 2005. They loved dancing on the weekends and together won many competitions. They had two daughters, Rosefrance and Patricia, who both survive them, as well as numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren. 

After Mary Ann's death, Nevot married Helen Bohn, one of his first Texas fencing students, on January 21, 2006. They celebrated their thirteenth anniversary and his 99th birthday in 2019. She also survives him, as does his older brother, Pierre, who fought in the French Resistance (Maquis). 

Nevot, the ultimate man of war and martial artist who trained others for war, died at peace, at home, in his sleep on July 1, 2019.


"There were giants on the earth in those days" (Gen. 6:4).

 https://www.greenwoodfuneralhomes.com/obituaries/Daniel-Nevot/#!/Obituary

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, idigTexas said:

Traitors, all of you...except Knox.

You obviously didn't read that obit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, Mrs Whiggins said:

That stage was both compelling and disappointing. I'm not sure what I was expecting, but it wasn't that.

I'm with Knoxtnhorn, though, as Movistar now has three riders in the top ten. Now what?

The space between the yellow jersey and sixth is 2:14. Tenth place is 5:58, held by Valverde.

Gotta give credit to Alaphalippe on those descents, though, I was leaning on the curves not wanting to watch a cyclist go over the edge.

 

I was hiking out on the couch as well.   But I'm still traumatized from driving in the Peloponnese so that hit close to home.

 

I think Bernal has this in the bag...  That's my best guess pick.  

Edited by Loco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, G650 said:

If they can't dislodge Ala on the Iseran, he will win this whole damn thing. 

My pick as it stands right now is Pinot.

nice pick...lulz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Loco said:

nice pick...lulz

Christ. Torn quad??? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stage "cancelled"  I understand the decision, but that could have been handled better.  It'll be fun to hear the team takes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Napoleon said:

You obviously didn't read that obit.

I did, but you ate all my ice cream, and I hold grudges.

bill-and-teds-excellent-adventure-napole

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Loco said:

Stage "cancelled"  I understand the decision, but that could have been handled better.  It'll be fun to hear the team takes

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The pictures of the "hail"  (looked like wet snow to me) and water on the road were pretty compelling.   The 80s called and want their sunglasses back...looking at you Bernal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Not only a letdown, total horseshit.

I understand for safety they can't let them ride through that section of the course. But moving the end retroactively to a spot that the riders weren't prepared for and in fact was "just a spot" until they stopped the race fundamentally changes how that stage is played out. Alaphalippe was probably willing to cede some time on L'Iseran, knowing he had the descent to make up the time. And that's just one example.

 

If they are going to do this, they might as well let all the dopers have their titles back.

Edited by Captain Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Captain Ron said:

Not only a letdown, total horseshit.

I understand for safety they can't let them ride through that section of the course. But moving the end retroactively to a spot that the riders weren't prepared for and in fact was "just a spot" until they stopped the race fundamentally changes how that stage is played out. Alaphalippe was probably willing to cede some time on L'Iseran, knowing he had the descent to make up the time. And that's just one example.

 

If they are going to do this, they might as well let all the dopers have their titles back.

Concur 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plus...

SATURDAY'S Stage 20 cut by 71km because of landslides and weather warnings

Saturday's penultimate stage of the Tour de France will be shortened by 71km because of landslides and severe weather warnings.

The leg will start from Albertville at 13:30 BST, instead of 11:30 BST, and conclude with the final 33km ascent to Val Thorens - a total distance of 59km...

https://www.bbc.com/sport/cycling/49134648

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well that announcement is going to change some things.

Other than poor Pinot, for whom I felt truly sorry at his misfortune, the stage was shaping up to be so exciting. After spending the morning playing WWMD (what would Movistar do-which would be an excellent drinking game except it was a weekday morning, alas) the suspense was building as Alaphilippe began his descent. (And as it turned out, Quintana was naturally played out and Landa wasn't as big a factor in playing stage spoiler)

When they were showing the footage of the roads, however, I had no desire to watch a 20 something rider plunge to his death so I completely get why they cancelled the stage. In the past they may not have, but this was the right decision. As far as when to count the times and places, I will leave that for those of you who have more interest in that sort of thing.

The shortening of tomorrow's stage, though...what drama! This could play out in so many delicious ways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont know. This is a disaster for the tour.

First off this race is over. Bernal has it won. I don't see how anyone makes up time on the Ineos 1-2.

Second, these 3 days we expected something great we aren't getting shit. Yesterday was fun, no moves. Today and tomorrow cut out. What a waste. 

We had one of the most exciting tours ever and no one will remember anything but a set of mudslides ruining the last 3 days. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Captain Ron said:

Not only a letdown, total horseshit.

I understand for safety they can't let them ride through that section of the course. But moving the end retroactively to a spot that the riders weren't prepared for and in fact was "just a spot" until they stopped the race fundamentally changes how that stage is played out. Alaphalippe was probably willing to cede some time on L'Iseran, knowing he had the descent to make up the time. And that's just one example.

 

If they are going to do this, they might as well let all the dopers have their titles back.

It sucks, but what would you have them do?  No matter what they did, it was going to be unfair for many riders.  Who's to say Bernal wouldn't have gained even more time on Alaphilippe on the final climb?  They have to stop the stage at a spot where they have accurate times.  They have official times at the top of the climb.  They don't have them at random places along the route.   

The shortened stage tomorrow does seem to benefit Bernal.  If he holds on, he will be the youngest ever winner. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Captain Ron said:

I dont know. This is a disaster for the tour.

First off this race is over. Bernal has it won. I don't see how anyone makes up time on the Ineos 1-2.

Second, these 3 days we expected something great we aren't getting shit. Yesterday was fun, no moves. Today and tomorrow cut out. What a waste. 

We had one of the most exciting tours ever and no one will remember anything but a set of mudslides ruining the last 3 days. 

For me, it is worse than that. I feel like they are just randomly picking a winner. End the race 5mi back and Alaphilippe wins the tour. End the race right before the slides and who knows. End the race at a random point and you get a random winner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Knoxtnhorn said:

I'm on record as rooting against the French.  That being said, 
 

Image result for not like this

Agreed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's worse because it was such a great Tour up till now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bevo said:

For me, it is worse than that. I feel like they are just randomly picking a winner. End the race 5mi back and Alaphilippe wins the tour. End the race right before the slides and who knows. End the race at a random point and you get a random winner.

This!  I assume they needed to end on a spot that had good timing/data and was as late as possible.  That means the summit, but it still sucks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree with most above--don't like the decision but not sure what else they could do. Shitty way to lose the yellow because it looked like Bernal was descending slowly (wasn't Yates catching back up to him?).

Only input I have is maybe they could have extended the ending to as far down the decent from L'Iseran as was safe.

Got dusty watching Pinot having to abandon. It's December 1812 all over again for the French.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Should have warned them, then let them finish.  Most exciting race ever - carrying bikes through mud slides, riding through rivers and ice covered roads.

This guy would have finished:

spacer.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
43 minutes ago, Jerry Callo said:

Should have warned them, then let them finish.  Most exciting race ever - carrying bikes through mud slides, riding through rivers and ice covered roads.

This guy would have finished:

spacer.png

Andy Hampsten would have  finished also........The Day the Big Men Cried. https://blog.castelli-cycling.com/2019/05/22/passo-gavia-the-day-the-big-men-cried/

Edited by BillyGoatHill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Braff Zacklin said:

Got dusty watching Pinot having to abandon

That was absolutely heartbreaking to watch. 

 

He had the form to win, to go out like that was brutal 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Knoxtnhorn said:

Race may be on your local NBC affiliate tomorrow if you're DVRing manually.

Thanks for the heads up.  Set the DVR last night and then remembered this morning that uVerse is not carrying NNC right now because of a beef with Nexstar.  Rebroadcast on NBCSN tomorrow morning before the ride into Paris is the best I found.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Jerry Callo said:

Thanks for the heads up.  Set the DVR last night and then remembered this morning that uVerse is not carrying NNC right now because of a beef with Nexstar.  Rebroadcast on NBCSN tomorrow morning before the ride into Paris is the best I found.

Yep.  Same boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That ended up being really lame.  I was excited for this shortened stage.  Instead, it turned into a boring group ride w/o any good attacks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Knoxtnhorn said:

That ended up being really lame.  I was excited for this shortened stage.  Instead, it turned into a boring group ride w/o any good attacks.

Didn't see this coming.

16 hours ago, Captain Ron said:

I dont know. This is a disaster for the tour.

First off this race is over. Bernal has it won. I don't see how anyone makes up time on the Ineos 1-2.

Second, these 3 days we expected something great we aren't getting shit. Yesterday was fun, no moves. Today and tomorrow cut out. What a waste. 

We had one of the most exciting tours ever and no one will remember anything but a set of mudslides ruining the last 3 days. 

Yeah, the weather really ruined these last two stages. The best thing the Tour could have hoped for was the Alaphilippe hanging onto yellow yesterday and then making today a final reshuffling. I don't disagree, Aliphilippe wasn't keeping yellow into Paris, but I think with a better stage make up yesterday and today we might not see Bernal in yellow.

It would have also helped had Pinot stayed healthy, then he could have made a run at Yellow too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

32 minutes ago, Knoxtnhorn said:

Lulz at INEOS/Sky. 

Loose Froome and still take the top 2 in the Tour.  

Quoting myself because I can't spell.  Obviously, I meant "lose".

I guess I'll tune in for the last 10 mins of the finale tomorrow.  

Quick question.  I could have sworn, about 10 years ago, that there was a really young rider from Texas that was supposed to be on his way to making waves.  I want to say he was from Austin, but I could be wrong.  It wasn't Haga.  I might be thinking of Craddock, but does anyone else recall someone like this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chapeau to Nibali for at least making everyone wonder if he would make it to the top. I agree that it was anticlimatic. I had hopes for some of the other riders that were close to the podium that they might try and give it a go, but it looked like they were all hanging on. Rather makes me wonder what would have happened had the weather not played such a large part: longer Stage 19 and 20 and who knows where we'd be. Ah well, Ineos has ushered in the heir apparent and it's all over but the champagne.

 

Knox--Craddock is the only one I can think of at the moment unless you mean someone who was a rising star but had yet to ride the Tour.

 

Napoleon--that was an impressive life for your coach. Very good read.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dan Martin had a really underwhelming Tour. Porte too, but I guess he is gonna finish so that's a win for him

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also: Valverde dick slapping Landa at the finish. Maximum lulz.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Movistar is a mess. Quintana is leaving (according to his father) so Landa and Valverde can supply the entertainment next year.

 

Since I don't spend any time watching the other races (although I occasionally look for results), I got to thinking about last year because every year there is a wonderkind in the mountains. One year it was Bardet, another Quintana, Bernal had been touted but there was that former ski jumper. I went and looked him up Roglic(?) They left him off the Jumbo team in France to support Kruisjwik as the GC rider, but for you that have in depth knowledge regarding strategy, was it to let him rest? The Jumbo team look very strong as a unit, but that kid was crazy last year.

I wish Richie Porte had a better year. That crash he suffered a couple of years ago was unforgettable.

How many more green jerseys for Peter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Valverde will be 57 years old next year, so movistar will finally have 1 clear leader and they'll actually fare better for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...