Jump to content
LTtxfan

2019 CFB Season Catch All Thread

Recommended Posts

Man Rice has themselves a nice home schedule for a G5 team

 

Wake Forest

Texas (NRG)

Baylor

LaTech

Southern Mississippi

Marshall

North Texas

 

I wonder if any other G5 teams has ever hosted 3 P5 teams in a season.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They finally brought back Dixieland Delight, for the last few games of last season. They blast "Beat Auburn" over the PA, to try and drown out the crowd yelling "Fuck Auburn". The following video is the game that got it stopped(part of it went out over the national TV broadcast).

 

Yep, fuck the vert video but not my video. I was in the upper deck, other sideline about the 20 yard line. Normally all of that is during commercial break but they came back early and we can't have all those impressionable ears hearing our foul language.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/26922581/the-sophomore-breakout-player-top-25-team

The sophomore breakout player for each Top 25 team

11. Texas: S Caden Sterns

After being named the Big 12 Defensive Freshman of the Year last season, Sterns figures to be the face of a revamped, though talented, Texas defense. Sterns is sure tackler with a nose for the ball and he headlines a secondary loaded with former blue-chip recruits. -- Trotter

9. LSU: LB K'Lavon Chaisson

When Chaisson went out with a knee injury after the first game of last season, LSU's defense was never the same. Without the hybrid outside linebacker/defensive end, who had sack, a tackle for loss and a quarterback hurry in the opener against Miami, the pass rush dried up. And while it might not have been apparent how much that was the case for most of the season, against top-tier teams such as Alabama, it showed up. And now that Chaisson is back and healthy again, he could make all the difference for a talented defense that also returns star safety Grant Delpit. -- Scarborough

4. Oklahoma: C Creed Humphrey

Humphrey is the lone returning starter for an offensive line named best in the country last season. Humphrey is the perfect anchor for the Sooners as they attempt to retool up front. At 6-foot-5, 325 pounds, Humphrey is massive for a center, and should warrant preseason All-America consideration after a dominant first season in Norman. -- Jake Trotter

2. Alabama: WR Jaylen Waddle

It's easy to get swept up by what a stellar trio of Tide receivers accomplished as sophomores. Whether it's Biletnikoff Award winner Jerry Jeudy, speedster Henry Ruggs III or national championship hero DeVonta Smith, there's a lot to like. They even have some awesome nicknames. But don't overlook a fourth standout: Despite his true freshman status and despite the depth ahead of him in 2018, Waddle managed to haul in the second-most receiving yards on the team (848) and tied for the third-most touchdowns (seven). In Ruggs and Waddle, Alabama might have the two most explosive receivers in the SEC. -- Alex Scarborough

(Don't forget Purdue WR Rondale Moore. 😡 )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Florida State Is Privatizing Its Athletic Department To Shield Itself From Scrutiny

Quote

Florida State University’s Board of Trustees voted Friday to establish a new organization that’ll run the school’s athletic department: The Florida State University Athletics Association. According to the Orlando Sentinel, FSU boasted that the new organization would “streamline the relationship” between the athletics department and boosters, and if that sounds shady as hell, it’s not even the half of it. The move will privatize FSU’s athletics department—essentially giving it all the benefits of being both a private corporation, including shielding it from public scrutiny—while still operating on behalf of a taxpayer-funded institution. Florida State is expecting the changes to take effect by the fall.

https://deadspin.com/florida-state-is-privatizing-its-athletic-department-to-1835378761

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Dolemite said:

Wonder if this will result in less oversight by and accountability to the NCAA? Not that that would matter much--when's the last time the toothless, limp-dick NCAA did anything of significance to anybody of substance? Penn State? Baylor?  blOw-U? Anybody in the secsecsec? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.sportingnews.com/us/ncaa-football/news/ranking-big-12-coaches-for-2019-lincoln-riley-tom-herman-add-new-layer-to-ou-texas-rivalry/s9dvh91qrzaf105xz89l0jgp0?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

Sporting News B12 Coaches Rankings...  

Rank Name School W L PCT. OVR
1 Lincoln Riley Oklahoma 24 4 .857 5
2 Tom Herman Texas 39 14 .736 9
3 Gary Patterson TCU 167 63 .726 12
4 Mike Gundy Oklahoma State 121 59 .672 20
5 Matt Campbell Iowa State 54 34 .614 23
6 Neal Brown West Virginia 35 16 .686 26
7 Les Miles Kansas 142 55 .721 30
8 Matt Rhule Baylor 8 17 .320 41
9 Chris Klieman Kansas State 0 0 .000 70
10 Matt Wells Texas Tech 44 34 .564 76

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Siap.....

https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2839654-ranking-the-best-receiving-corps-for-2019-college-football-season#slide0 

Ranking the Best Receiving Corps for 2019 College Football Season

  1. Bama
  2. Clemson
  3. blOU
  4. USC
  5. Wash St.
  6. TEXAS
  7. UH
  8. Okie Lite
  9. ohio st
  10. North Texas

Honorable Mention:  baylor, Colorado, Memphis, Mich., Minn., Purdue, smu, aggy 😆

 

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the worst part of the offseason.  It’s still out on the horizon, but close enough that you start grabbing at any little ranking or goofy list and really giving it 5x the thought the guy who wrote it did.  Arguing about shit like

Top 10 Cheerleader Footwear

The Most Important Walk-On for Each Top-25 Team

Each Top-25 Team’s All-Time Greatest Punter

The Most Hated Volleyball Coaches Among the Schools in the College Football Top-25 

 

Edited by Liquor and Poker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How the Multi-Bye Week Schedule Might Shake Up the 2019 College Football Season

Several teams with high expectations for this fall will have to navigate a schedule quirk that only crops up every handful of years.

By JOAN NIESEN    June 06, 2019

This fall, college football will enjoy its version of a leap year—except 14 weeks of football is a hell of a lot better than 29 days of February.   The 2019 calendar allows for 14 regular-season weeks before conference championship Saturday instead of the usual 13, and although that doesn’t mean extra football, it does mean extra time for the same amount of football, which everyone benefts from in the form of a second bye week. The last time college football faced a double-bye year was in 2014. It happened in 2013, too, and before that, 2008. Here’s why it happens: In the majority of years, there are 13 Saturdays from the Saturday two days before Labor Day until the Saturday after Thanksgiving. But this year, Labor Day falls just one day past its earliest possible date, and Thanksgiving falls on its latest possible date. That means one more week of football, for 14 total, for each team to play the same amount of regular-season games (12) as usual. This has been your lesson in the Gregorian calendar.

As for what that means for college football: in the grand scheme, very little. Teams will still play the same number of regular-season games, and by conference championship week and bowl season, everyone will be working off of similar levels of rest. But on a smaller scale, this quirk of scheduling does affect the season. It’s impossible to predict which schedules will turn out to be advantageous and which won’t—who knows what hot streaks might be cooled by a week off and which slumps or injuries will be met with some needed downtime—but there are some quirky schedules that result from the extra fall Saturday.

Three Power 5 teams—Arizona, Miami and Florida—get three byes because their seasons kick off in Week 0 on Aug. 24. Each sits out Week 1 in return, and they’re all lucky enough to enjoy a well-spaced slate of bye weeks after that. Arizona and Miami have one each in August, September and November, and Florida gets a Saturday off in August, October and November.   Two Big 12 teams have Week 2 byes. Both Iowa State and TCU get the second week of the season off; each opens in Week 1 against an FCS team. (Iowa State takes on UNI, and TCU gets the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff.) In a regular season, that would be far too early for a break and make for a brutal rest of the season, but not this year. In a sense, all this does is delay the start of real football for both teams from Week 1 until Week 3, when Iowa State hosts Iowa and TCU travels to Purdue. Each should get a chance to ease into the season, and TCU’s schedule takes that to the extreme: It’s off both Sept. 7 and again on Oct. 12, meaning that when it takes the field in Week 8, it will have played just five games.

Northwestern’s two early byes might be a blessing to help break up a challenging first half. The Wildcats open at Stanford, then get a Week 2 breather before hosting UNLV and Michigan State, then travel to Wisconsin and Nebraska before their second bye arrives on Oct. 12. That midseason off week gives them valuable rest before what should be the toughest matchup of their season, at home on a Friday night against Ohio State.   Michigan also has it pretty good when it comes to byes. The Wolverines get their first weekend off in Week 3, just before their first conference game at Wisconsin. Even though the Badgers had a down year in 2018, that doesn’t mean they won’t pose a threat to Michigan this fall. The next bye comes in Week 11 on Nov. 9, in advance of this year’s meeting with Michigan State in Ann Arbor.  The Spartans themselves will be well-rested by that point, maybe even to a fault. They travel to Wisconsin on Oct. 12, then have a bye, then host Penn State, then have another free Saturday. Time will tell what playing two football games in just under a month does to MSU’s momentum.

Two ACC teams face a similar situation in October, a month during which NC State and Wake Forest each play just two games. The Wolfpack host Syracuse on Oct. 10 (a Thursday night game) and play at Boston College on Oct. 19, meaning they will suit up on exactly one October Saturday in a month bookended by byes. Meanwhile, Wake Forest faces Louisville on Oct. 12 and Florida State on Oct. 19. Both games are in Winston-Salem, meaning the Demon Deacons won’t leave Winston-Salem all month. In fact, after they return from their Sept. 28 game at Boston College, they won’t go on the road again until Nov. 9.  Nebraska is the rare Power 5 team with a front-loaded schedule and plenty of rest down the stretch. The Huskers play seven games before their first week off, on Oct. 19. Then they play Indiana and Purdue—a relatively manageable stretch—before bye No. 2 in Week 11. They round out the season with Wisconsin, Maryland and Iowa. Overall, Nebraska’s schedule provides Scott Frost and his charges a good opportunity to rebound from last year’s 4–8 campaign.

USC just gets to end a week early, taking one of its byes in Week 14 just as it did in 2017. This best-case scenario may be somewhat unlikely after a disappointing season in which the Trojans weren’t even bowl-eligible, but by not playing on the Saturday after Thanksgiving, the Trojans will miss out on one last chance to impress. If USC is actually in the playoff hunt, the week off could offer precious time to prepare for the Pac-12 title game the following weekend, but what if this late bye actually takes USC’s fate out of its own hands as other contenders make a final statement to the selection committee? No matter what anyone says about the effect of visibility on the playoff race, on a weekend when all butts tend to be on couches and eyes on college football, the Trojans will be nowhere to be found.

https://www.si.com/college-football/2019/06/06/double-bye-weeks-year-michigan-state-michigan-usc-tcu-florida-miami

 

Edit:  Texas byes:  Sept 28th  and  Nov. 2nd

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Texas byes:  Sept 28th  and  Nov. 2nd

 

Texas Longhorns Schedule - 2019

Regular Season
DATE OPPONENT TIME TV TICKETS
Sat, 8/31
vsLTLT
7:00 PM
 
Tickets as low as $5 
Sat, 9/7
vsLSULSU
6:30 PM
 
Tickets as low as $37 
Sat, 9/14
vsRICERICE *
7:00 PM
CBSSN
Tickets as low as $44 
Sat, 9/21
vsOKSTOKST
TBD   Tickets as low as $9 
Sat, 10/5
@WVUWVU
TBD   Tickets as low as $111 
Sat, 10/12
vsOKLAOKLA *
11:00 AM
FOX
Tickets as low as $244 
Sat, 10/19
vsKUKU
TBD   Tickets as low as $8 
Sat, 10/26
@TCUTCU
TBD   Tickets as low as $113 
Sat, 11/9
vsKSUKSU
TBD   Tickets as low as $9 
Sat, 11/16
@ISUISU
TBD   Tickets as low as $37 
Sat, 11/23
@BAYBAY
TBD   Tickets as low as $67 
Fri, 11/29
vsTTUTTU
11:00 AM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/27019455/college-football-schedule-superlatives-2019-season

College football schedule superlatives for the 2019 season

8:00 AM CT.   Chris Low  ESPN 

The absolute most important thing to understand any time you're previewing the upcoming college football season, and especially when you're doing a deeper dive on schedules, is that "ain't nobody playing anybody."

It's a time-honored phrase and one coated in its own vernacular depending on where you reside and what team you live and die with every fall Saturday afternoon. It's also a phrase that will invariably reach a crescendo come College Football Playoff selection time in December. Until then, we'll hand out a few preseason superlatives when it comes to the 2019 college football schedule, some to be proud of and some sure to cause considerable angst. As the Head Ball Coach, aka Steve Spurrier, used to say (quoting his old coach Pepper Rodgers), a coach is only as good as his players and his schedule.  And maybe there's something to that because the two teams that played for the national championship a year ago -- Alabama and Clemson -- combined to face just five Power 5 teams that managed more than eight wins during the 2018 regular season. The Crimson Tide and Tigers also combined to produce 16 selections in the 2019 NFL draft, including eight players taken in either the first or second round.

Now, on to our selections:

Toughest overall Power 5 schedule

A handful of schools could make cases, particularly South Carolina, but nothing rises to the level of the gantlet staring Gus Malzahn and Auburn in the face this season. The Tigers face six of the top 12 teams in ESPN's latest Way-Too-Early preseason rankings, and four of those games are away from home. The Aug. 31 opener is against No. 10 Oregon in Arlington, Texas, followed by true road games against No. 12 Texas A&M on Sept. 21, No. 8 Florida on Oct. 5 and No. 9 LSUon Oct. 26. Of course, the "good news" is that Auburn returns home for its November grind ... against No. 3 Georgia on Nov. 16 and No. 2 Alabama on Nov. 30. The proverbial hot seat has become all too familiar for Malzahn. When is it not for the head football coach on the Plains? But with a schedule like this, Malzahn's seat just got hotter -- if that's possible.

Easiest overall Power 5 schedule

Justin Fuente could use a big season, and Virginia Tech's schedule looks like it just might cooperate. The only game against an opponent ranked in ESPN's latest preseason rankings comes on the road against Notre Dame on Nov. 2, but the Hokies have an open date the week before playing the Irish. Moreover, they won't have to leave the state of Virginia for five of their last seven games. And, oh yeah, they avoid Clemson, NC State and Syracuse from the ACC's Atlantic Division during the regular season. After winning just six games a year ago, Virginia Tech's pathway to double-digit wins in 2019 doesn't look all that unrealistic.

Most interesting schedule

As an FBS independent, scheduling can be tricky for BYU, but the Cougars should be in for a wild ride -- one way or the other -- in 2019. Not only are they the only team in college football to open the season against four straight Power 5 opponents (Utah, Tennessee, USC and Washington), but those four games all come in successive weeks. The caveat is that the Aug. 29 opener against Utah is a Thursday night game. The folks in Provo are going to love the home schedule. In addition to Utah, USC, Washington and Boise State all come to LaVell Edwards Stadium.

Toughest open to the season

Stanford plays six straight weeks to open the season before getting a bye, and three of those games are against teams in ESPN's preseason rankings. The Cardinal open with Northwestern at home on Aug. 31, then face USC and UCF on the road in back-to-back weeks, return home to face Oregon on Sept. 21, play at Oregon State the next week and then come back home to face Washington on Oct. 5.

Toughest close to the season

This was an easy call. Boston College ends the season with four road trips in its last five games, and the only home game in that stretch is against Florida State. The Eagles travel to Clemson on Oct. 26, travel to Syracuse on Nov. 2, face FSU at home Nov. 9, and then after an open date, travel to Notre Dame on Nov. 23 and to Pittsburgh on Nov. 30.

Cushiest open to the season

Ohio State faces Florida Atlanticand Cincinnati at home to open the season, then travels to Indiana and comes back home to face Miami (Ohio). Pretty safe bet that Ryan Day and the Buckeyes will be 4-0 going to Nebraska on Sept. 28.

Cushiest close to the season

Kentucky closes the season with a November that has a distinct Volunteer State flavor to it, and three of the four games are at home. Tennessee on Nov. 9, UT-Martin on Nov. 23 and Louisville on Nov. 30 will all come to Kroger Field. The only away game is against Vanderbilt on Nov. 16. None of UK's four November foes finished with a winning record a year ago.

Road weary

Take your pick between Texas A&M and Michigan State as to which Power 5 school plays the toughest road schedule in 2019. The Aggies play at Clemson on Sept. 7 and then close the season with road games against Georgia on Nov. 23 and LSU on Nov. 30. Meanwhile, the Spartans play at Northwestern on Sept. 21, at Ohio State on Oct. 5, at Wisconsin on Oct. 12 and at Michigan on Nov. 16.

Home cooking

Does anybody have an easier slate at home this season than Virginia Tech? The Hokies face Old Dominion, Furman, Duke, Rhode Island, North Carolina, Wake Forest and Pitt in Blacksburg. Then again, it's not like Alabama is overextending itself at home this season, either. The Crimson Tide face New Mexico State, Southern Miss, Ole Miss, Tennessee, Arkansas, LSU and Western Carolina in Tuscaloosa.

Power 5 shy

The Big Ten gets the "award" for having the most teams not playing a Power 5 opponent or Notre Dame during the nonconference portion of their schedules. Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio State and Wisconsin all fall into that category.

Power 5 shy on steroids

Arkansas, Ohio State and Tennessee are the only three Power 5 teams in the country not playing any Power 5 opponents or Notre Dame in their nonconference schedules and playing all of their nonconference games in their home stadiums. Kudos to the ACC, though. All 14 ACC teams are playing at least one nonconference game against a Power 5 school or Notre Dame.

Power 5 happy

Boston College is the only Power 5 school playing three nonconference games against a Power 5 opponent or Notre Dame. The Eagles face Kansas at home and Rutgers and Notre Dame on the road.

Owning the SEC

For the second straight season, Clemson has two nonconference games against SEC foes -- Texas A&M at home and South Carolina on the road. Dabo Swinney is 13-5 against SEC teams since the start of the 2012 season, which includes five wins over South Carolina, three wins over Auburn, two wins over Alabama and wins over Georgia, LSU and Texas A&M.

Beast of the East

Alabama returns to South Carolina on Sept. 14 for the first time since 2010, when Steve Spurrier, Stephen Garcia, Alshon Jeffery and the Gamecocks ambushed the No. 1-ranked Crimson Tide 35-21. Not only was that the last time Alabama lost to an SEC Eastern Division team, but it's the only time a Nick Saban-coached Alabama team has lost to an SEC opponent by 14 points or more. Alabama is 68-8 against all SEC opponents since that loss.

Bright lights of L.A.

UCLA ventures outside of Los Angeles only twice during the months of October and November, to face Stanford on Oct. 17 and Utah on Nov. 16. The Bruins play at USC on Nov. 23, but that game is at the Coliseum.

Unrivaled

Colorado will open the season with three consecutive games against in-state or traditional rivals -- Colorado State in Denver, Nebraska in Boulder and Air Force in Boulder. Thanks to some ace research by Colorado's David Plati and his staff, there are only 13 other instances in which an FBS school has opened the season against two straight rivals since 1971, when 11-game schedules came into being. Plati and his crew could not find an instance of an FBS school opening with three straight rivals. This will be the first meeting between Colorado and Air Force since 1974.

On the road again

In just under a five-week span from Sept. 21 to Oct. 17, UCLA plays three true Pac-12 road games against Washington State on Sept. 21, Arizona on Sept. 28 and Stanford on Oct. 17, which is preceded by an open date. Mississippi State will also be living out of its suitcase from Sept. 28 through Nov. 2. In those six weeks, the Bulldogs will go on the road to face Auburn on Sept. 28, Tennessee on Oct. 12, Texas A&M on Oct. 26 and Arkansas on Nov. 2. They get an open date on Oct. 5, so four of the five games during that stretch are on the road.

No backing down for Holgo, Houston

As Dana Holgorsen embarks on his first season at Houston, the Cougars are taking on all comers. They open the season by playing at Oklahoma, then face Washington State two weeks later in the AdvoCare Texas Kickoff at NRG Stadium. Three of their first four games are on short weeks, giving them four games in 19 days.

Don't get caught napping

Which Power 5 teams could get tripped up by Group of 5 teams? Among the possibilities: Oregon faces Nevada on Sept. 7, a week after the Ducks open the season against Auburn. North Carolina faces Appalachian State at home on Sept. 21. Mack Brown started his head-coaching career in Boone. Wake Forest opens the season on Aug. 30 at home against Utah State. Stanford plays at UCF on Sept. 14, and Pitt takes on UCF at home on Sept. 21.

Staying in the sunshine

Miami plays nine of its 12 games in the state of Florida, including the opener against Florida on Aug. 24 in Orlando, a road game at Florida State on Nov. 2 and a road game at Florida International on Nov. 23.

Bye-bye Irish

Seven of Notre Dame's opponents have a bye before they play the Irish -- New Mexico, Bowling Green, USC, Virginia Tech, Duke, Navy and Boston College. The Irish are 10-1 under Brian Kelly coming off their own bye week. Moreover, Georgia will be coming off a game against Arkansas State and Virginiacoming off a game against Old Dominion.

Frequent flier miles

The drive from Stanford University to Spectrum Stadium, where UCF plays its home football games, is 2,880 miles. Fortunately for the Cardinal, they won't be driving for that Sept. 14 affair. Nonetheless, that's a mighty long way to go for a football game.

September to remember

There are some intriguing matchups the first three weeks of September, including LSU at Texas, Texas A&M at Clemson, Army at Michigan and Stanford at USC on Sept. 7. On Sept. 14, Stanford plays at UCF, Oklahoma plays at UCLA, and Clemson plays at Syracuse. Then on Sept. 21, Notre Dame travels to Georgia, and Michigan travels to Wisconsin.

SEC November scrimmage weekend

On Nov. 23, Alabama plays Western Carolina, Auburn plays Samford, Kentucky plays UT-Martin, and Vanderbilt plays East Tennessee State. Something says the SEC ticket brokers won't be raking in the cash that weekend.

In-state tuition

Pitt goes the first five weeks of the season without leaving the state of Pennsylvania, although one of the games is at Penn State on Sept. 14.

Conference game that's a nonconference game

ACC foes Wake Forest and North Carolina will play Sept. 13, but it won't count as a conference game. Each team has only three other nonconference games.

Deep in the heart of Texas

Texas plays only one game outside the state (at West Virginia on Oct. 5) until it travels to Iowa State on Nov. 16. The Longhorns have a "road" game against Rice at NRG Stadium in Houston on Sept. 14, the Red River Rivalry against Oklahoma in Dallas on Oct. 12 and a game against TCU in Fort Worth on Oct. 26.

Group of 5 travel

Kent State is hoping to improve on a 2-10 season in Year 2 under Sean Lewis, who at 33 is the youngest FBS head coach. The Golden Flashes' nonconference road schedule won't be of much assistance. In their first five games of the season, they play road games at Arizona State on Aug. 29, at Auburn on Sept. 14 and at Wisconsin on Oct. 5.

Toughest early season road trip

Southern Miss faces a tough test early, visiting Mississippi State, Troy and Alabama consecutively. Northern Illinois will also be tested, visiting Utah, Nebraska and Vanderbilt consecutively.

Toughest Group of 5 nonconference schedule

Kent State isn't taking the easy way out, visiting Arizona State, Auburn and Wisconsin in the first five weeks of the season.

 

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Player Evaluation Analytics......

“In recruiting you miss. You’re going to miss. So, we figure: If you’re going to miss, miss fast.”  The NFL has long targeted athletic exceptions within certain positional parameters. Hall of Fame NFL executive Gil Brandt Tweeted out a scouting chart prior to the NFL combine that showed his targets for per-position drill work.

 

"Behold the analytics revolution: If you’re gonna miss, miss fast."   

 
 
 
Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scouting.....

 

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good article that segments have been quoted elsewhere.....

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/27046211/how-top-cfb-contender-win-national-title 

"How each top CFB contender can win the national title"

 

Teams included in the article are:  
Alabama | Clemson | Georgia | Ohio State | Oklahoma | LSU | Michigan | Texas | Oregon | Florida | Washington | Notre Dame | Texas A&M | Auburn | Wisconsin | Miami | Nebraska

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That contenders article's bit on Joe Burrow's accuracy is kind of amusing, because it praises his accuracy against "tough" defenses like aggy... who the same writers later point out have no secondary to speak of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who can do more with less?  Best value CFB Coaches that don't get Top 10 rated recruiting classes gifted to them.

Will Cain's Top 5 Value CFB Coaches:

  1. Leach
  2. Patterson
  3. Gundy
  4. Whittingtham
  5. Harsin

 

Maybe some others include

  • NW coach Fitzgerald
  • MichSt-- D'Antonio
  • Nebraska-- Scott Frost
  • Stanford -- Shaw
  • IowaSt-- Campbell
  • Baylor-- Rhule

Any others come to mind??  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Walden Ponderer said:

Jeff Monken - Army
Dino Babers - Syracuse
Jay Norvell - Nevada

Thx.... Did consider Dino.

Iowa coach Ferentz ??

Obviously the Purple Wizard too.. 

Maybe the Purdue coach   (Brohm) ??

Maybe the WVU coach   (Neal Brown) ??

Maybe VaTech   (Justin Fuente) ??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Discussion in separate articles have asst coaches at both Baylor and West Virginia saying how less pressure on signing Top Ranked Classes allows opportunities to sign a few more undervalued high ceiling players...

 

Baylor talent evaluation mentioned in this article:

https://247sports.com/college/texas/Article/College-football-recruiting-testing-numbers-Tracking-Football-133192451/

“Our goal wasn’t to be a one-hit wonder,” Frank (Penn St) said. “Now that we’re toward the upper end of the recruiting hierarchy, I still think we have a staff that’s been at a variety of different cases that in most cases weren’t recruiting at top 10 levels. We’re going to get some kids that are readymade. But we still have it in our hearts we ultimately want to take a guy with a higher ceiling. We’re only going to take the readymade kid if he’s a really good athlete.  “We’ll take the elite athlete that might take a few years to develop because we feel to be an elite program you have to have elite athletes across the board. If you don’t, you’re not going to be at the highest level.”  This is ultimately a trust-based recruiting approach.  The NFL has attempted to interview Rhule each of the last two seasons for head coaching jobs. That’s in large part because he’s managed to consistently develop NFL athletes. The Bears have a system – everything from practice structure to strength and conditioning – they believe in, which allows them to take chances other programs might not.

“I kind of feel bad for some of those other schools with the pressure they have to take some of the kids they have to take sometimes because of their ranking, etcetera,” Cooper (Baylor) said. “This is just kind of who we are. This is a Matt Rhule deal.”

-------------------------------------------------------

West Virginia comments from this article:

https://www.si.com/college-football/2019/06/27/neal-brown-west-virginia-mountaineers-recruiting  

Around this time each year, Koenning says, the Trojans’ staff began targeting nearby players that SEC and ACC programs had passed on. It will be different at West Virginia. “Here, you’re recruiting the ones, but realistically you’re at the next tier. That’s where you’re spending a good amount of your time,” he says. “What you’ve got to be careful of is spending too much time with the [highest-ranked recruits], the five-stars or four-stars or whatever, and you don’t get the next guys.” Here, getting players to camp might be more difficult because of travel distances, and seeing each kid in person within a recruiting territory that spans 17 states could be a problem, too.

On the bright side, expectations for a highly touted signing class do not exist here. That’s a good thing, coaches say. “Truthfully, sometimes it’s easier to recruit when you’re at a place when you don’t have to worry about the stars because you can take the guys you like,” Moore says. “Recruiting is a crapshoot. Sometimes you take stars and sometimes you’re like, ‘Is that kid really that good?’ As a coach, sometimes you’re sitting there going, ‘Man, I’ve got to get this four-star kid, but look at this kid. Nobody knows about him, but he’s a two-star. They’re going to have a fit if I try to sign this kid, but I know he’s better.’ At this place, they’re not hung up on recruiting battles. These people here just want to win.”

 

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Siap...

247 Ranks college football's 10 fastest players in 2019

10. SALVON AHMED, RB, WASHINGTON

9. JALEN REAGOR, WR, TCU

8. DEVIN DUVERNAY, WR, TEXAS 

7. DEREK STINGLEY, CB, LSU

6. DAX HILL, S, MICHIGAN

5. TROY PRIDE JR., CB, NOTRE DAME

4. HENRY RUGGS III, WR, ALABAMA

3. JAVARIS DAVIS, CB, AUBURN

2. KARY VINCENT, CB, LSU

1. ANTHONY SCHWARTZ, WR, AUBURN s

Our honorable mentions include Coleton Beck (Virginia Tech), Reggie Roberson (SMU), Tyson Campbell (Georgia), Jeff Gladney (TCU), Demetris Robertson (Georgia), Jaylen Waddle (Alabama), Tavien Feaster (transfer portal), and Tyler Owens (Texas).

https://247sports.com/LongFormArticle/College-football-fastest-players-Alabama-Crimson-Tide-Texas-Longhorns-Auburn-Tigers-LSU-2019-132493301/Amp/?__twitter_impression=true

 

DEVIN DUVERNAY, WR, TEXAS

Test time: 10.27 in the 100 meters in high school, per AL.com's Drew Champlin

247Sports take: The Longhorns' Z receiver is a field-stretcher with speed to burn when he gets a window of opportunity in the open field. He averaged 20.6 yards per reception as a elite-level freshman in 2016, before that averaged tailed off a bit over the past two seasons (13.8). Paired with John Burt, Duvernay gives Texas another deadly option on the outside this fall. In 32 career games, Duvernay has 70 catches for 1,082 yards and seven touchdowns. With Bru McCoy's unexpected departure this week, Duvernay's impact in the passing game should be substantial.

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bleacher Report:  10 Fastest Players in College Football in 2019 

10. Demetris Robertson, WR, Georgia  

9. Jeff Gladney, CB, TCU

8. John Burt, WR, Texas

7. Devin Duvernay, WR, Texas

6. Salvon Ahmed, RB, Washington

5. Tavien Feaster, RB, Clemson 

4. Troy Pride Jr., CB, Notre Dame 

3. Jalen Reagor, WR, TCU

2. Javaris Davis, CB, Auburn

1. Anthony Schwartz, WR, Auburn

https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2822235-10-fastest-players-in-college-football-in-2019#slide0

 

John Burt, WR, Texas

Top time: 6.94 in the 60-meter, 10.72 in the 100

Injuries have limited Texas receiver John Burt's production since his solid freshman season in 2015, but he's still fast and has been productive when given the chance. Granted a medical redshirt this past season, Burt will be back for his fifth year in 2019. The Longhorns have added significant depth with their most recent recruiting haul, but Burt's experience can pay off as he battles for a bigger role.

The 6'3", 195-pound speedster has been a big-play magnet despite accumulating modest career numbers. He has averaged 14.6 yards per catch on his 58 receptions and has catches of 72, 84 and 90 yards. The senior should be an attractive option for Tom Herman to utilize if he can stay healthy.

Devin Duvernay, WR, Texas

Top time: 10.27 in the 100 meters in high school, per AL.com's Drew Champlin.

The second Texas Longhorn on our list of fastest players in the country is receiver Devin Duvernay. The senior has accumulated 70 receptions for 1,082 yards and seven touchdowns throughout his 32 career games. Like John Burt, he figures to be part of an improved passing Longhorns offense as Sam Ehlinger continues to develop.  

Duvernay played plenty last year and set a new career high in receptions, yards and touchdowns. There were other missed opportunities, though, as Ehlinger's shoulder injury and lack of chemistry with Duvernay led to several downfield incompletions. His trademark deep post routes still helped create underneath holes for Collin Johnson and Lil'Jordan Humphrey.

His ability to win one-on-one and maintain his speed advantage while cutting makes him a nightmare in the slot. Whether facing a slot corner or safety, he's capable of continuing his path of acceleration and gaining leverage with ease. That's a unique trait that separates him from stiffer runners.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/25/2019 at 10:33 AM, LTtxfan said:

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/27019455/college-football-schedule-superlatives-2019-season

Beast of the East

Alabama returns to South Carolina on Sept. 14 for the first time since 2010, when Steve Spurrier, Stephen Garcia, Alshon Jeffery and the Gamecocks ambushed the No. 1-ranked Crimson Tide 35-21. Not only was that the last time Alabama lost to an SEC Eastern Division team, but it's the only time a Nick Saban-coached Alabama team has lost to an SEC opponent by 14 points or more. Alabama is 68-8 against all SEC opponents since that loss.

Conference game that's a nonconference game

ACC foes Wake Forest and North Carolina will play Sept. 13, but it won't count as a conference game. Each team has only three other nonconference games.

 

This is why I hate bloated mega-conferences.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2843540-every-college-football-playoff-contenders-biggest-flaw#slide0 

Every College Football Playoff Contender's Biggest Flaw

KERRY MILLER           JULY 3, 2019

Alabama and Clemson should square off in the College Football Playoff for a fifth consecutive season, but potential defensive issues could keep both heavy favorites from winning it all.  They're not alone, though. All of the teams with legitimate aspirations of being chosen by the CFP selection committee have at least one major red flag that could derail their best-laid plans.   Both Big 12 contenders (Oklahoma and Texas) need to address glaring concerns on defense. Both Big Ten contenders (Michigan and Ohio State) have even larger question marks on offense. And the special teams for LSU and Oregon might be the furthest thing from special.   These issues won't bury all of these squads. Somehow, some way, four teams are going to the College Football Playoff. But these are the hurdles the top contenders will need to clear to get there.          

Teams are listed in ascending order of likelihood of winning the national championship, per the consensus title odds on OddsShark as of July 1.

10. Florida Gators

Championship Odds: 33.7-1

Biggest Flaw: Inexperienced Offensive Line

Feleipe Franks made massive strides at quarterback in Dan Mullen's first year as the Florida Gators head coach. Franks returns, as does what feels like every Gator who caught one of his passes last season.   And even though the defense lost Jachai Polite, Vosean Joseph and Chauncey Gardner-Johnson to the NFL, most of the unit's starters are back for another year.  In other words, there are plenty of reasons to believe this team can improve upon what was already an impressive 10-win campaign.   There is one glaring concern, though: offensive line.   The Gators lost Jawaan Taylor, Martez Ivey, Fred Johnson and Tyler Jordan—a quartet of big men that registered a combined total of 51 out of 52 possible starts last season. Thus, aside from presumed starting center Nick Buchanan, Florida has a great big question mark in the offensive trenches.   Improved blocking was quietly one of the biggest reasons Florida's offense improved so much from 2017 to 2018. During that disastrous 4-7 campaign, the Gators allowed 3.36 sacks per game, good for 124th in the nation. They chopped that all the way down to 1.39 this past season. They also did a much better job of opening lanes for Lamical Perine, turning him into one of the better yards-per-carry running backs in the SEC.  It's great to have all those skill-position players back, but they'll only be as good as their blockers. If this new offensive line isn't in tip-top shape by the time that four-game gauntlet of Auburn, LSU, South Carolina and Georgia rolls around starting Oct. 5, Florida's dream season could turn into a nightmare in a hurry.  

8. (tie) LSU Tigers

Championship Odds: 26-1

Biggest Flaw: Special Teams

The Tigers have an excellent punter in Zach Von Rosenberg. The rising junior averaged 45.7 yards per punt last season, which was the seventh-highest mark in the nation.  And when they don't need a booming punt, there's also Josh Growden to handle the coffin-corner duties. There aren't many punting platoons in college football, but LSU clearly has one of the best.  The Tigers also have a great leg for kickoffs in Avery Atkins. LSU allowed the fewest kickoff return yards of any team last season (126) thanks to Atkins' ability to mash 71 of 79 kickoffs for touchbacks as a freshman.   The other special teams units are much less of a sure thing for Ed Orgeron and Co.  Cole Tracy was one of the best kickers in the country last year, making all 42 of his extra-point attempts and 29 out of 33 field goals—including the game-winner at Auburn. But he is out of the picture, leaving true freshman Cade York as the likely place-kicker right away. At least York is the fourth-best kicker in this year's recruiting class, according to 247Sports.  LSU doesn't have any return specialists, either. The Tigers had a grand total of 99 punt-return yards in 2018 and only had three kickoff returns that went for 30 or more yards. In both departments, those marks were worse than at least half the country.  The kicking is obviously the bigger concern, though. Granted, Alabama has shown in recent years that you can vie for a title without a superb kicking game, but those Crimson Tide teams were more dominant in other areas than LSU figures to be. And there is no margin for error in the SEC West.

8. (tie) Oregon Ducks

Championship Odds: 26-1

Biggest Flaw: Field Goals and Deep Passes

Oregon didn't lose many key players from last season, but Dillon Mitchell was a big one. He led the Pac-12 in receiving yards (1,184) and had nearly three times as many yards as the next-closest Duck.  Mitchell was responsible for more than 30 percent of the team's targets, receptions and receiving touchdowns. Without a close runner-up, he was Justin Herbert's favorite target.  Moreover, Mitchell was the go-to guy for deep balls. He had 20 receptions that went for at least 20 yards. No. 2 on that list was tight end Jacob Breeland with eight catches of that distance.  The Ducks brought in Penn State graduate transfer Juwan Johnson to hopefully help fill that hole, and Herbert is more than talented enough to take a Brenden Schooler or Johnny Johnson III from a background role and turn him into an All-Pac-12 wide receiver. Even if the Ducks don't have a receiver as singularly dominant as Mitchell, they should still be in great shape on offense.  What Herbert can't help is a woeful kicking unit.  Oregon only made six field goals (out of 11 attempts) in the entire 2018 campaign, the longest of which was a 39-yarder. It was the third consecutive season in which the Ducks connected on fewer than 10 three-pointers, and it's anybody's guess whether they'll stick with Adam Stack or hand the reins to true freshman Camden Lewis.

7. Texas Longhorns

Championship Odds: 21.7-1

Biggest Flaw: Secondary

To consistently succeed in the Big 12, you have to hold your own against above-average passing attacks.  To put it lightly, Texas did not do that last year.  In five of six regular-season games against opponents who ranked in the top 50 in passer-efficiency rating, the Longhorns allowed at least a 66.7 completion percentage, 310 passing yards, three passing touchdowns and 34 points. They lost three of those games and needed tie-breaking scores in the final 30 seconds to win the other two.  The good news is that Oklahoma's Kyler Murray, West Virginia's Will Grier and Oklahoma State's Taylor Cornelius are all gone. It still won't be easy to navigate the Big 12 schedule, but in Sam Ehlinger, Texas probably has the best quarterback in the conference. That should help the secondary hide some of its deficiencies.  The bad news is the defensive backfield might be even more porous in 2019 after it lost Kris Boyd and Davante Davis—the two team leaders in pass breakups.  Head coach Tom Herman bent over backward to try to address this problem during the 2018 recruiting cycle. The Longhorns signed three of the top six safeties in that class, as well as three of the top 15 cornerbacks. Both Caden Sterns and B.J. Foster immediately thrived as true freshmen, but the Longhorns are going to need guys like Anthony Cook, Jalen Green and D'Shawn Jamison to deliver on that potential sooner rather than later.

6. Oklahoma Sooners

Championship Odds: 14.3-1

Biggest Flaw: The Entire Defense

Oklahoma led the nation in scoring last season at a rate of 48.4 points per game. It was the Sooners' fourth consecutive year of averaging at least 43.5 points.  And despite the departures of Kyler Murray, Marquise Brown and Rodney Anderson, and four offensive linemen taken in the first four rounds of the 2019 NFL draft, the expectation is that new quarterback Jalen Hurts and head coach Lincoln Riley will lead this offense to yet another prolific campaign.  Will the defense hold up its end of the bargain for a change?  The Sooners allowed 33.3 points per game in 2018, including at least 40 points in five of their last six contests. They fired defensive coordinator Mike Stoops in early October, but it didn't help. In the College Football Playoff semifinal loss to Alabama, they allowed touchdown drives of at least 48 yards on each of the Crimson Tide's first four possessions, digging themselves an insurmountable 28-0 hole.  The hope is the defense will be stingier under new coordinator Alex Grinch.  Grinch worked some magic as the DC at Washington State from 2015 to 2017. The Cougars had ranked 95th or worse in points allowed per game in each season from 2007 to 2014 and had given up 38.6 points per game the year before hiring Grinch. He immediately got them down to 27.7 in his first season, and they ranked in the top 60 in points allowed in each of his final two seasons.  No one is expecting the Sooners D to start pitching shutouts, but if Grinch can bring them from atrocious to slightly below average, that might be enough for this offense to win a title.

5. Michigan Wolverines

Championship Odds: 14.2-1

Biggest Flaw: Limited Explosiveness on Offense

Even if Michigan had beaten Ohio State last year and reached the College Football Playoff, most of the experts around the nation didn't seem to believe the Wolverines had a legitimate shot at toppling Alabama and/or Clemson. The main reason is that this offense wasn't operating at the same level as the true contenders.  Oklahoma (111), Clemson (104) and Alabama (101) led the nation in plays that went for at least 20 yards. Ohio State's slant-heavy pass game ranked third in plays of at least 10 yards with 272 of them. For each of those four offenses, it felt like they'd score on every possession, making almost any comeback a possibility.  And then there's Michigan, which languished close to the national average with only 175 plays of 10 or more yards and 61 that went for at least 20 yards. The Wolverines prioritized establishing the run and never had much quick-strike potential—this despite having a quarterback (Shea Patterson) who threw for at least 320 yards in seven of his 10 games with Ole Miss and the highest-rated wide receiver in the 2017 recruiting class (Donovan Peoples-Jones).  Patterson was solid and DPJ did have a bit of a breakout year, but it wasn't anything close to the high-octane offense we started dreaming about from the moment Patterson transferred to Michigan.  The good news is Michigan actually has an offensive coordinator this season. Rather than splitting up the play-calling duties between the various assistant coaches for a second straight year, Jim Harbaughbrought in Josh Gattis from Alabama to infuse this offense with some of the magic the Crimson Tide had last year.  We'll see if things change for the better, though. After all, this will be Gattis' first season as the lone offensive coordinator for a team.

4. Ohio State Buckeyes

Championship Odds: 9.3-1

Biggest Flaw: Inexperience at Quarterback

The funny thing is we had the same concern about Ohio State last season. Dwayne Haskins had some moments of brilliance as a redshirt freshman in 2017, but he was far from a sure thing to fill the full-time gig J.T. Barrett was leaving. Haskins ended up being incredible. But his success doesn't necessarily mean Justin Fields will flourish from a similar starting point.  Moreover, if Haskins hadn't panned out, at least Ohio State had an excellent Plan B in Tate Martell. The Buckeyes don't have that luxury this year, as Martell transferred to Miami shortly after Fields arrived in Columbus. Instead, the Buckeyes' de facto backup plan in 2019 will be Chris Chugunov, who had a career 47.4 completion percentage in limited playing time with West Virginia in 2016 and 2017.  And at least Haskins had been in the Ohio State program for two years before he took the reins. He was supremely talented, but he also knew the ins and outs of that offense. As a transfer from Georgia, Fields has only been around for a few months. He's also entering a program in at least a little bit of flux as Ryan Day supplants Urban Meyer as the head coach.  All that said, provided he stays healthy, Fields should be outstanding. He was the No. 2 overall recruit in last year's class and is one of the most highly touted dual-threat quarterbacks ever. He should be the latest stud at a program where the likes of Barrett, Braxton Miller, Cardale Jones, Terrelle Pryor and Troy Smith have thrived in recent years.  But the lack of both experience and depth at quarterback is still a concern for the Buckeyes. If it takes Fields some time to reach his potential or if he misses time to an injury, Ohio State will be in trouble.

3. Georgia Bulldogs

Championship Odds: 7.2-1

Biggest Flaw: Backfield Penetration

To win the national championship, Georgia is possibly going to need to defeat Alabama in the SEC title game before then beating both Alabama and Clemson in the College Football Playoff. Even for what should be the third-best team in the nation, that is a nearly impossible task.  It becomes even more unlikely once you factor in Georgia's complete lack of backfield penetration.  If you want to win three games against Tua Tagovailoa and Trevor Lawrence, you've got to be able to get in their faces, disrupt their rhythm and make them think twice about every decision. But Georgia does not have a single returning player who recorded more than 2.0 sacks or 6.0 tackles for loss in 2018. Thus, that probably won't happen.  The Bulldogs averaged 4.64 tackles for loss per game last season, which ranked 116th nationally. They were also tied for 100th in sacks per game at a rate of 1.71. From that already lackluster unit, they lost three of their four most disruptive players in D'Andre Walker, Jonathan Ledbetter and Natrez Patrick.  Walker was the biggest blow, as he had 13 sacks, 24.5 tackles for loss and five forced fumbles over the past two seasons. Even though the team's numbers were weak as a whole, at least Walker was making opposing offensive coordinators lose sleep.   With so much talent on this roster, it's almost inevitable that someone will emerge as a new star and a potential All-American. Both Quay Walker and Azeez Ojulari are candidates to fill that role. If the Bulldogs can't pull another Roquan Smith type of one-man force of nature out of their sleeve, though, they'll fall short of winning it all.

1. (tie) Alabama Crimson Tide

Championship Odds: 2.3-1

Biggest Flaw: Secondary Play

Early growing pains in the secondary were to be expected for the Crimson Tide last year. Every noteworthy defensive back from the 2017 season either graduated or left early for the NFL, leaving Alabama with a tabula rasa in what is usually one of its (many) areas of dominance.  The problem is that secondary didn't improve with age. In fact, it got worse as the season progressed.  Twelve of Alabama's 14 interceptions came in its first seven games, meaning there were only two in the final eight. After 11 contests, opponents were barely completing half of their pass attempts and averaging 169.5 passing yards and 1.1 touchdowns. Aside from one hiccup against Arkansas (233 yards, three touchdowns), what was supposed to be Alabama's Achilles' heel didn't look like one at all.  However, in the SEC championship tilt against Georgia and the CFP games against Oklahoma and Clemson, Alabama allowed eight combined passing touchdowns with no interceptions and gave up at least 300 passing yards in each contest. That defense was especially atrocious in the national championship loss to Clemson, in which the Tigers had five receptions of more than 25 yards.  Granted, Trevor Lawrence, Kyler Murray and Jake Fromm were three of the best quarterbacks in the country last season, but that's the caliber of opponent this secondary will need to stifle in January.  If Patrick Surtain II and Co. don't make significant improvements...well, Alabama's offense will still outscore most opponents with room to spare. But that could be this team's downfall against Clemson for a second straight year.

1. (tie) Clemson Tigers

Championship Odds: 2.3-1

Biggest Flaw: Unknowns in the Defensive Front Seven

It has been a while since the defensive line and linebacker corps were even question marks for Clemson, let alone potential glaring weaknesses. The Tigers have led the nation in tackles for loss in five of the past six seasons, and they have ranked top three in sacks in four consecutive years.  After Clemson lost six of its seven starters—including the entire D-line—things might be different in 2019. The Tigers have a few stone-cold studs in linebacker Isaiah Simmons and defensive end Xavier Thomas, but there's quite a bit of uncertainty beyond that dynamic duo.  Can Jordan Williams and Nyles Pinckney even remotely replicate what Dexter Lawrence and Christian Wilkins did in the trenches for the past several seasons? Can redshirt freshman Mike Jones Jr. and/or redshirt junior James Skalski be counted on to lock down the linebacker jobs previously held by Tre Lamar and Kendall Joseph? And how much of a factor will 2018 5-star DE K.J. Henry be after playing just 39 snaps in his first season?  Much like Alabama and Georgia, Clemson isn't exactly hurting for options at its most likely weak point. The Tigers have 14 linemen/linebackers who were either 4-star or 5-star recruits. Hard to feel bad for a team that can fill out its entire two-deep with players that just about every program in the country desperately wanted to sign.  Those recruiting stars don't guarantee anything, though, and Clemson now needs to rely on starters who barely saw the field last season. That might not be a major problem during ACC play, but the Tigers will need their normal allotment of backfield penetration once the CFP arrives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Moreover, if Haskins hadn't panned out, at least Ohio State had an excellent Plan B in Tate Martell."

So much for that author's credibility. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/5/2019 at 10:58 AM, mdleast said:

I’m excited we actually have a quality “week zero” game for the first time since...no, for the first time ever?

The Kickoff Classic had some marque names, but not always competitive games.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alabama assistant S&C coach, Josh Chapman, got his second DUI since joining the staff, last night. I bet he is gone by Monday. Saban gives second chances but not third chances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, bamachine said:

Alabama assistant S&C coach, Josh Chapman, got his second DUI since joining the staff, last night. I bet he is gone by Monday. Saban gives second chances but not third chances.

I bet he can get a job at FAU now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/24/2019 at 8:57 AM, LTtxfan said:

Texas byes:  Sept 28th  and  Nov. 2nd

 

Texas Longhorns Schedule - 2019

Regular Season
DATE OPPONENT TIME TV TICKETS
Sat, 8/31
vsLTLT
7:00 PM
 
Tickets as low as $5 
Sat, 9/7
vsLSULSU
6:30 PM
 
Tickets as low as $37 
Sat, 9/14
vsRICERICE *
7:00 PM
CBSSN
Tickets as low as $44 
Sat, 9/21
vsOKSTOKST
TBD   Tickets as low as $9 
Sat, 10/5
@WVUWVU
TBD   Tickets as low as $111 
Sat, 10/12
vsOKLAOKLA *
11:00 AM
FOX
Tickets as low as $244 
Sat, 10/19
vsKUKU
TBD   Tickets as low as $8 
Sat, 10/26
@TCUTCU
TBD   Tickets as low as $113 
Sat, 11/9
vsKSUKSU
TBD   Tickets as low as $9 
Sat, 11/16
@ISUISU
TBD   Tickets as low as $37 
Sat, 11/23
@BAYBAY
TBD   Tickets as low as $67 
Fri, 11/29
vsTTUTTU
11:00 AM

Openings of dove season (south zone) and deer season.  Nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blindside's brother (SJ Tuohy)  is Chad Morris' shadow....

https://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2019/jun/29/morris-right-hand-man-never-short-on-wo/?sports 

"Morris' right-hand man never short on work to do"

SJ Tuohy handed me his card about halfway through the interview when asked about his job description as right-hand man for head coach Chad Morris. The lead line on his card explains that relationship.

Here is what it says on the plastic card that most resembles a hotel room key:

• Special Assistant to the Head Coach

• Assistant Director of Football Operations

• Assistant Director of Player Personnel

• Camp Director

Oh, there's more, as tasks relate to those four jobs and how they interact throughout the athletics department. And there is an important line missing that might go up top: Chief Helper for Recruiting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2019 Big 12 Football Media Preseason Poll
    1. Oklahoma (68) -- 761
    2. Texas (9) -- 696
    3. Iowa State -- 589
    4. TCU -- 474
    5. Oklahoma State -- 460
    6. Baylor -- 453
    7. Texas Tech -- 281
    8. West Virginia -- 241
    9. Kansas State -- 191
  10. Kansas -- 89

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1) I wonder if Iowa State has ever been picked this high before?

2) Numbers 4-6 are really difficult to guess/ separate.

3) Number 10 I feel confident about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, LTbear said:

2019 Big 12 Football Media Preseason Poll
    1. Oklahoma (68) -- 761
    2. Texas (9) -- 696
    3. Iowa State -- 589
    4. TCU -- 474
    5. Oklahoma State -- 460
    6. Baylor -- 453
    7. Texas Tech -- 281
    8. West Virginia -- 241
    9. Kansas State -- 191
  10. Kansas -- 89

We don’t have a thread about big 12 preseason. I mean I get it but...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, LTbear said:

1) I wonder if Iowa State has ever been picked this high before?

2) Numbers 4-6 are really difficult to guess/ separate.

3) Number 10 I feel confident about.

Lolz, no.  Maybe picked second in the North in '05?...but third in the conference?  No.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, SnowAggy said:

Lolz, no.  Maybe picked second in the North in '05?...but third in the conference?  No.

Well deserved. Y'all are building something legit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LTbear said:

1) I wonder if Iowa State has ever been picked this high before?

2) Numbers 4-6 are really difficult to guess/ separate.

3) Number 10 I feel confident about.

I think #3 thru #6 are all close to one another eventhough  B12 media favors Iowa State...

   3. Iowa State -- 589
    4. TCU -- 474
    5. Oklahoma State -- 460
    6. Baylor -- 453

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, LTtxfan said:

I think #3 thru #6 are all close to one another eventhough  B12 media favors Iowa State...

   3. Iowa State -- 589
    4. TCU -- 474
    5. Oklahoma State -- 460
    6. Baylor -- 453

Rhule and BU should scare the shit out of 3-5.  I know he's got my attention. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Preseason ESPN Fpi:  Texas #24  w/7.7 Wins projected

2019 Football Power Index
RK TEAM W-L PROJ W-L WIN OUT% CONF WIN% REM SOS RK FPI
1 Clemson, ACC 0-0 12.3 - 0.7 48.9 88.2 56 29.2
2 Alabama, SEC 0-0 11.0 - 1.6 14.2 46.0 20 27.9
3 Georgia, SEC 0-0 9.9 - 2.7 2.5 27.1 5 22.3
4 LSU, SEC 0-0 9.5 - 2.8 1.5 11.4 10 21.7
5 Michigan, Big Ten 0-0 10.5 - 2.1 8.2 48.2 21 21.2
6 Oklahoma, Big 12 0-0 10.9 - 2.0 10.2 69.7 40 19.6
7 Notre Dame, FBS Indep. 0-0 9.4 - 2.6 2.6 -- 51 18.2
8 Florida, SEC 0-0 8.3 - 4.0 0.2 6.8 3 17.6
9 Auburn, SEC 0-0 7.7 - 4.4 0.0 2.1 7 16.8
10 Oregon, Pac-12 0-0 9.7 - 2.9 2.4 35.2 44 16.7
11 Texas A&M, SEC 0-0 7.4 - 4.7 0.0 2.2 11 16.1
12 Penn State, Big Ten 0-0 8.9 - 3.2 1.0 10.4 43 15.6
13 Ohio State, Big Ten 0-0 8.7 - 3.4 0.7 8.7 26 14.1
14 Mich. St., Big Ten 0-0 8.8 - 3.3 0.6 8.3 42 14.0
15 Tennessee, SEC 0-0 7.6 - 4.5 0.0 2.0 16 14.0
16 Miss St, SEC 0-0 7.7 - 4.3 0.0 1.2 19 13.7
17 Washington, Pac-12 0-0 9.1 - 3.3 1.3 19.9 29 13.5
18 S Carolina, SEC 0-0 6.1 - 5.9 0.0 0.9 1 12.3
19 Missouri, SEC 0-0 8.1 - 3.9 0.4 0.0 33 12.1
20 UCLA, Pac-12 0-0 7.8 - 4.5 0.1 14.1 9 11.9
21 Florida State, ACC 0-0 8.1 - 3.9 0.1 2.4 46 11.6
22 Utah, Pac-12 0-0 8.6 - 3.8 0.4 14.5 47 11.5
23 Iowa, Big Ten 0-0 7.9 - 4.4 0.1 8.0 38 10.5
24 Texas, Big 12 0-0 7.7 - 4.6 0.0 8.1 35 10.0
25 USC, Pac-12 0-0 6.7 - 5.5 0.0 7.0 2 10.0
26 Iowa State, Big 12 0-0 7.9 - 4.4 0.1 7.1 37 9.8
27 Miami, ACC 0-0 8.2 - 4.1 0.1 3.7 58 9.3
28 Minnesota, Big Ten 0-0 8.3 - 4.0 0.2 7.9 54 8.9
29 Baylor, Big 12 0-0 8.2 - 4.0 0.1 6.4 63 8.5
30 Washington St, Pac-12 0-0 7.4 - 4.7 0.1 2.2 50 8.4
31 Nebraska, Big Ten 0-0 8.1 - 4.2 0.1 6.0 55 8.2
32 Virginia Tech, ACC 0-0 8.4 - 3.9 0.1 2.8 66 8.1
33 Stanford, Pac-12 0-0 6.2 - 5.9 0.0 3.1 4 7.6
34 UCF, American 0-0 9.7 - 2.8 2.4 38.8 75 7.6
35 TCU, Big 12 0-0 7.3 - 4.8 0.0 3.5 48 7.5
36 Arizona State, Pac-12 0-0 7.0 - 5.1 0.0 3.4 36 7.4
37 Oklahoma State, Big 12 0-0 7.3 - 4.8 0.0 3.3 49 7.1
38 Wisconsin, Big Ten 0-0 6.6 - 5.5 0.0 1.4 28 6.7
39 Cincinnati, American 0-0 8.5 - 3.9 0.3 30.6 67 6.4
40 Kentucky, SEC 0-0 6.4 - 5.7 0.0 0.2 32 6.3
RK TEAM W-L PROJ W-L WIN OUT% CONF WIN% REM SOS RK FPI
41 Ole Miss, SEC 0-0 5.8 - 6.2 0.0 0.0 18 6.1
42 Boise State, MW 0-0 9.8 - 2.9 1.9 62.0 95 5.9
43 Virginia, ACC 0-0 7.4 - 4.7 0.0 1.1 61 5.7
44 BYU, FBS Indep. 0-0 7.5 - 4.5 0.1 -- 64 5.5
45 Texas Tech, Big 12 0-0 6.6 - 5.4 0.0 1.4 52 5.1
46 NC State, ACC 0-0 7.4 - 4.6 0.0 0.5 65 4.7
47 Indiana, Big Ten 0-0 6.6 - 5.5 0.0 0.3 57 4.6
48 Pitt, ACC 0-0 6.7 - 5.5 0.0 0.7 53 4.0
49 Syracuse, ACC 0-0 6.7 - 5.3 0.0 0.3 60 3.9
50 Vanderbilt, SEC 0-0 5.3 - 6.7 0.0 0.0 14 3.8
51 Arizona, Pac-12 0-0 5.4 - 6.6 0.0 0.5 15 3.7
52 Northwestern, Big Ten 0-0 5.7 - 6.3 0.0 0.6 27 3.1
53 Memphis, American 0-0 8.9 - 3.7 0.4 18.8 89 3.1
54 North Carolina, ACC 0-0 5.4 - 6.6 0.0 0.2 25 2.3
55 Cal, Pac-12 0-0 4.8 - 7.2 0.0 0.1 13 2.2
56 Duke, ACC 0-0 5.3 - 6.7 0.0 0.2 34 1.2
57 Kansas State, Big 12 0-0 5.3 - 6.7 0.0 0.3 39 1.2
58 West Virginia, Big 12 0-0 4.6 - 7.4 0.0 0.2 12 1.1
59 Wake Forest, ACC 0-0 6.1 - 5.9 0.0 0.0 62 0.6
60 Arkansas, SEC 0-0 4.8 - 7.2 0.0 0.0 23 0.5

http://www.espn.com/college-football/team/fpi?id=278&year=2019

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Preseason ESPN Fpi  #60 - #129

RK TEAM W-L PROJ W-L WIN OUT% CONF WIN% REM SOS RK FPI
61 W Michigan, MAC 0-0 8.7 - 3.8 0.3 37.7 112 0.4
62 Purdue, Big Ten 0-0 4.8 - 7.2 0.0 0.2 24 0.4
63 Colorado, Pac-12 0-0 4.0 - 8.1 0.0 0.0 6 0.3
64 Appalachian St, Sun Belt 0-0 8.9 - 3.6 0.4 42.3 121 -0.2
65 Boston College, ACC 0-0 5.1 - 6.9 0.0 0.0 45 -0.3
66 Louisville, ACC 0-0 4.4 - 7.6 0.0 0.0 22 -1.0
67 Army, FBS Indep. 0-0 9.2 - 3.8 0.1 -- 123 -1.2
68 Maryland, Big Ten 0-0 4.1 - 7.9 0.0 0.0 17 -1.3
69 Air Force, MW 0-0 7.6 - 4.5 0.1 8.2 99 -1.5
70 Marshall, C-USA 0-0 8.3 - 4.1 0.2 24.1 115 -1.6
71 Fresno State, MW 0-0 7.3 - 5.1 0.0 10.2 90 -2.2
72 Florida Intl, C-USA 0-0 8.2 - 4.0 0.2 15.9 120 -2.4
73 USF, American 0-0 6.7 - 5.4 0.0 3.2 73 -2.5
74 Southern Miss, C-USA 0-0 7.3 - 5.1 0.0 18.8 92 -3.0
75 Ga Southern, Sun Belt 0-0 7.6 - 4.7 0.0 18.4 103 -3.1
76 Temple, American 0-0 6.7 - 5.4 0.0 1.4 86 -3.2
77 Toledo, MAC 0-0 7.8 - 4.5 0.1 21.8 117 -3.4
78 San Diego State, MW 0-0 7.0 - 5.3 0.0 8.1 93 -3.7
79 Illinois, Big Ten 0-0 4.7 - 7.3 0.0 0.0 59 -3.9
80 Houston, American 0-0 5.7 - 6.4 0.0 2.4 69 -4.0
RK TEAM W-L PROJ W-L WIN OUT% CONF WIN% REM SOS RK FPI
81 SMU, American 0-0 6.3 - 5.9 0.0 2.5 79 -4.4
82 Georgia Tech, ACC 0-0 3.7 - 8.3 0.0 0.0 30 -4.6
83 Utah State, MW 0-0 5.6 - 6.5 0.0 3.4 70 -4.7
84 Oregon St, Pac-12 0-0 3.1 - 8.9 0.0 0.0 8 -4.7
85 North Texas, C-USA 0-0 7.8 - 4.5 0.1 13.1 125 -4.8
86 FAU, C-USA 0-0 6.9 - 5.3 0.0 10.0 104 -4.9
87 Tulane, American 0-0 5.7 - 6.4 0.0 1.5 71 -5.4
88 Hawai'i, MW 0-0 6.7 - 6.5 0.0 3.6 88 -5.6
89 Arkansas State, Sun Belt 0-0 7.2 - 5.3 0.0 17.4 114 -5.8
90 LA Tech, C-USA 0-0 7.5 - 4.7 0.1 8.2 126 -5.9
91 Ohio, MAC 0-0 7.4 - 5.1 0.1 20.5 124 -5.9
92 Rutgers, Big Ten 0-0 3.5 - 8.5 0.0 0.0 31 -6.6
93 Troy, Sun Belt 0-0 6.8 - 5.4 0.0 7.3 116 -6.7
94 W Kentucky, C-USA 0-0 6.2 - 5.9 0.0 3.4 106 -6.8
95 Wyoming, MW 0-0 5.7 - 6.4 0.0 1.1 91 -7.4
96 Tulsa, American 0-0 4.3 - 7.7 0.0 0.5 68 -7.8
97 N Illinois, MAC 0-0 5.2 - 6.9 0.0 4.1 72 -8.0
98 UAB, C-USA 0-0 7.3 - 4.8 0.0 3.9 129 -8.1
99 Louisiana, Sun Belt 0-0 6.2 - 6.0 0.0 5.9 113 -8.6
100 Nevada, MW 0-0 5.7 - 6.4 0.0 1.4 100 -8.8
RK TEAM W-L PROJ W-L WIN OUT% CONF WIN% REM SOS RK FPI
101 Mid Tennessee, C-USA 0-0 5.4 - 6.7 0.0 2.0 76 -8.8
102 Colorado State, MW 0-0 4.7 - 7.3 0.0 0.7 85 -9.0
103 UL Monroe, Sun Belt 0-0 5.4 - 6.8 0.0 5.2 82 -9.2
104 UNLV, MW 0-0 4.9 - 7.2 0.0 1.0 77 -9.3
105 Miami (OH), MAC 0-0 5.2 - 7.0 0.0 5.2 84 -10.4
106 Ball State, MAC 0-0 5.2 - 6.9 0.0 1.5 107 -10.7
107 East Carolina, American 0-0 5.5 - 6.5 0.0 0.1 102 -10.7
108 Kansas, Big 12 0-0 2.8 - 9.2 0.0 0.0 41 -11.0
109 Texas State, Sun Belt 0-0 5.2 - 6.9 0.0 2.3 108 -11.5
110 E Michigan, MAC 0-0 5.5 - 6.6 0.0 1.6 119 -11.5
111 Buffalo, MAC 0-0 5.7 - 6.4 0.0 3.7 127 -11.9
112 Georgia State, Sun Belt 0-0 4.6 - 7.5 0.0 1.0 94 -12.1
113 San Jose State, MW 0-0 4.0 - 8.0 0.0 0.2 80 -12.4
114 Liberty, FBS Indep. 0-0 5.6 - 6.4 0.0 -- 118 -13.1
115 New Mexico, MW 0-0 4.4 - 7.6 0.0 0.1 98 -13.4
116 Navy, American 0-0 3.9 - 8.1 0.0 0.1 87 -13.6
117 Kent State, MAC 0-0 4.1 - 8.0 0.0 1.7 83 -13.8
118 C. Carolina, Sun Belt 0-0 5.1 - 7.0 0.0 0.3 128 -13.9
119 Cent Michigan, MAC 0-0 4.7 - 7.4 0.0 0.5 111 -14.5
120 UTSA, C-USA 0-0 4.6 - 7.5 0.0 0.4 101 -14.5
RK TEAM W-L PROJ W-L WIN OUT% CONF WIN% REM SOS RK FPI
121 Charlotte, C-USA