Jump to content

Texas RB Talk


LTtxfan

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

I like RosCh, he wants to play big boy smash mouth.  I have always liked smash mouth football, time we got us some more

Edited by Domedriver
Left out the C which he demands C means contact, combat, constantly, team Captain!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Lhorn said:

Man I hope they find a way to get Jonathon Brooks some carries.  He looks like he could be a good one. 

That’s the problem. Everyone wants someone to get more touches, but Bijan needs his carries. If Rojo, Keilan, and Brooks all get their touches, than Bijan is  going to tote the rock 8-10 times and this place will implode. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, Codaxx said:

That’s the problem. Everyone wants someone to get more touches, but Bijan needs his carries. If Rojo, Keilan, and Brooks all get their touches, than Bijan is  going to tote the rock 8-10 times and this place will implode. 

Next year will be a transition year with no Bijan or Roschon. KRob, Brooks, Blue, and perhaps Owens will get a lot of looks. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your “Way too early” 2023 first round draft selections 

https://collegefootballnews.com/lists/2023-nfl-draft-top-32-pro-prospects-first-look
 

32 C/OG Jarrett Patterson, Notre Dame
31 S Jordan Battle, Alabama
30 LB Justin Flowe, Oregon
29 QB Cameron Ward, Washington State
28 CB Tre’vius Hodges-Tomlinson, TCU
27 LB Jack Campbell, Iowa
26 EDGE BJ Ojulari, LSU
25 OT Peter Skoronski, Northwestern
24 WR Kayshon Boutte, LSU
23 EDGE Derick Hall, Auburn
22 CB Eli Ricks, Alabama
21 WR Jordan Addison, Pitt
20 OG Emil Ekiyor, Alabama
19 OT Jaelyn Duncan, Maryland
18 RB Sean Tucker, Syracuse
17 S Brandon Joseph, Notre Dame
16 DE Isaiah Foskey, Notre Dame
15 TE Michael Mayer, Notre Dame
14 LB Trenton Simpson, Clemson
13 QB DJ Uiagalelei, Clemson
12 OT Paris Johnson, Ohio State
11 EDGE Nolan Smith, Georgia
10 DT Bryan Bresee, Clemson
9 LB Noah Sewell, Oregon
8 CB Kelee Ringo, Georgia
7 RB Bijan Robinson, Texas
6 DT Jalen Carter, Georgia
5 DE Myles Murphy, Clemson
4 QB Bryce Young, Alabama
3 WR Jaxon Smith-Njigba, Ohio State
2 QB CJ Stroud, Ohio State
1 EDGE Will Anderson, Alabama

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Lot's of Texas run game discussion on this "On Texas Football" podcast    (May 25th)

 

Spoilering since it's a lot of Ian B.

Spoiler

On Texas Football:  Quick News Updates/Sark Leaning on Running Game

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh man, I am excited about the Horns RB play this year. RoJo, KRo both should be fun. Let's run all over everyone on our schedule :) 

Happy summer to Horn fans and as usual it's just a prelude to the fall when Horns start their 2022 campaign. 

Hook'em Horns!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
40 minutes ago, CosmoDog said:

Uh, yes? Was that a trick question?

Jamal Charles was as good as anybody we've got, including Bijan. Moment one supreme badass. I only wish he'd stuck around and won the Heisman so people would remember him like they ought to.

Edited by mwaadeeb
  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, mwaadeeb said:

Jamal Charles was as good as anybody we've got, including Bijan. Moment one supreme badass. I only wish he'd stuck around and won the Heisman so people would remember him like they ought to.

Yes he was. My comment was not about an individual player, but about the RB room as a whole. I’d take our current set of RBs over those from 2005. We have both quality and quantity. In 2005 Jamaal was the #2 RB behind Selvin Young.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, CosmoDog said:

Yes he was. My comment was not about an individual player, but about the RB room as a whole. I’d take our current set of RBs over those from 2005. We have both quality and quantity. In 2005 Jamaal was the #2 RB behind Selvin Young.

Ramonce Taylor end around for a TD every time and Goal Line Henry Melton would like a word with you

 

Also JC being #2 behind Young was a reflection of coaching not a reflection of the players. So I disregard that data point entirely.

 

 

Tiers in terms of talent shown in 05 vs 21

Bijan

JC

-

Taylor

-

Johnson

-

Young

-

Keilan

-

Brooks/Melton at this point who cares

 

it's arguing over split hairs, but it's end of May so nothing better to do. I take the 05 group over last years, basically because I like the combo of JC and Taylor very slightly more than Bijan Rojo. Both are luxury's to have in the RB room. I'm also a massive JC stan that thinks he's one of the best RB's ever so yeah -_-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, cam4mav said:

Ramonce Taylor end around for a TD…

Tiers in terms of talent shown in 05 vs 21

Bijan

JC

-

Taylor

-

Johnson

-

Young

-

Keilan

-

Brooks/Melton at this point who cares

 

it's arguing over split hairs, but it's end of May so nothing better to do. I take the 05 group over last years, basically because I like the combo of JC and Taylor very slightly more than Bijan Rojo. Both are luxury's to have in the RB room. I'm also a massive JC stan that thinks he's one of the best RB's ever so yeah -_-


Call me a “hopeless ramontic”, but I’ll take the 2005 squad.

  • Hook 'Em 3
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, cam4mav said:

Ramonce Taylor end around for a TD every time and Goal Line Henry Melton would like a word with you

 

Also JC being #2 behind Young was a reflection of coaching not a reflection of the players. So I disregard that data point entirely.

 

 

Tiers in terms of talent shown in 05 vs 21

Bijan

JC

-

Taylor

-

Johnson

-

Young

-

Keilan

-

Brooks/Melton at this point who cares

 

it's arguing over split hairs, but it's end of May so nothing better to do. I take the 05 group over last years, basically because I like the combo of JC and Taylor very slightly more than Bijan Rojo. Both are luxury's to have in the RB room. I'm also a massive JC stan that thinks he's one of the best RB's ever so yeah -_-

We’ll since it is May …

Both sets of RBs were/are pretty good. The 2005 squad did have the benefit of a very good offensive line and a pretty good tight end. Oh, and the QB was pretty decent.

If we’re just cherry picking from the 2005 squad, I think I’d be happy with their defense.

I had forgotten about Ramonce, ever since he ran off into the sunset with a backpack of weed. And Melton was fun as hell to watch.

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In this week's edition of The Insider, we go in-depth on what makes new Texas running backs coach Tashard Choice a rising star in his profession with the people who helped him along the way.

The Insider: How Tashard Choice emerged as a rising star in the coaching world

By FUCK CHIP BROWN May 19, 2022

Quote

After playing with Adrian Peterson at Oklahoma and then with Calvin Johnson at Georgia Tech, Texas running backs coach Tashard Choice got an early look at greatness, and how much work it was going to take to reach his dream of playing in the NFL.

“I knew I was going to have to work harder because I wasn’t as talented as those jokers — at all,” laughed Choice, a two-time ACC rushing champion at Georgia Tech (after transferring from OU) who went on to a six-year NFL career, including four seasons with the Dallas Cowboys (2008-11).

Now, Choice, a rising star in the coaching ranks, is all fired up to be back in the Lone Star State, where he began his NFL career after being drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in the fourth round in 2008 - and where he began his coaching career, spending three seasons at North Texas.

Last Saturday, the Cowboys brought Choice in for the fourth straight year to talk to the team’s rookie players.

One of Choice’s messages to the rookies was to treat praise and criticism the same.

“Value neither,” Choice said. “Stay right in the middle lane. When you have success early, people praise you. But then when you fumble the football and lose the game — I had that happen against Washington in 2011 — people can say some really hard stuff to you and attack you.

“You gotta stay in the middle of the road and continue to work and deflect that stuff and continue to bust your tail and trust your teammates and make sure your teammates still trust you. You can’t let outside interference mess around with your focus about what you gotta do every day and every year.”

Choice’s mission right now is trying to help the Longhorns’ running back room, led by junior sensation Bijan Robinson and senior Roschon Johnson, to understand that hard work isn’t measured in personal success, but rather by team success.

“I try to keep them in the mindset of constantly having to work,” Choice said. “You can never think that you’ve made it. I think we’ve got a really good room, and we can sit back at the end of the year and figure out how good we really are. And the only way we can judge that is how many times did we win this year?

“I tell the guys, ‘You can be as good as you want to be, but if it doesn’t factor into the only column that matters — the win column — how good are we?’ That’s my constant attention to them: ‘You can only be as good as the team goes. So you’ve got to point out to your teammates that you’ve got to work extra hard, so we can win.’ Once we finish this year, we’ll really see how good we are.”

***

11109290.jpg?fit=bounds&crop=620:320,off

(Photo: Tashard Choice)

Ask anyone who’s coached, worked with or played with Choice, and they all talk about his grinding work ethic, his high football IQ, his strong faith, his people skills, his killer sense of humor and his seemingly boundless energy.

“If I had to say one word about Tashard, it’s passion,” said North Texas head coach Seth Littrell, who brought Choice in as an unpaid volunteer coach in 2016 and then elevated Choice to a quality control role in 2017 before making him running backs coach in 2018.

“He’s passionate about life,” Littrell said. “And because God gave him that gift, it brings people in to where he can have an impact on their lives.”

Choice’s former teammate with the Dallas Cowboys, 14-year NFL quarterback Jon Kitna, helped Choice figure out that he had what it took to be a coach.

Kitna, then the head coach at Waxahachie High School in 2015, asked Choice if he would work with his players during a 7-on-7 summer workout.

“He and I, my first year in Dallas (in 2010), we were in that second huddle together,” Kitna said. “And he’d be back there saying, ‘Kit, Kit, this guy is coming right here.’ He just always saw the game like a quarterback.”

Choice was doing some television and radio in Dallas while trying to figure out his next step following his NFL playing career and accepted Kitna’s invitation.

After one session that included some Choice advice to then-Waxahachie receiver Jalen Reagor (now with the Philadelphia Eagles) to “work on one thing each day,” the players wanted Choice to come back.

He did.

And kept coming back.

“Some people find out, ‘Man, I’ve got a passion for seeing other people being their best selves,’” Kitna said. “Sometimes, you don’t know that about yourself until you do it. It’s the reason I do what I do. It’s what gets me out of bed every morning. And I think Tashard figured that out about himself.”

11109280.jpg?fit=bounds&crop=620:320,off

(Photo: Tashard Choice, 247Sports)

Chan Gailey, who coached Choice (and Johnson, who in 2021 was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame) at Georgia Tech and then coached Choice again with the Buffalo Bills (in 2011 and 2012), said Choice has three key ingredients that make him an excellent coach:

“First, his competitiveness,” said Gailey, who also served as the Cowboys’ head coach in 1998 and 1999. “He wants to be great and looked for ways to be great. And he did it in a confident way, not a cocky way. And there’s a difference in those two.

“Second, he was highly intelligent — a very, very smart football player. He understood what we were trying to do: understood blocking schemes, understood where the weakness of the defense was and how we were trying to exploit that, and not many guys who are running backs get all of that. He understood the entire concept of what we were trying to do.

“Thirdly, he’s a great guy. Always has a smile on his face; brought enthusiasm to the team. He was that kind of guy every day. And it didn’t matter if it was his first day there, and he didn’t know anybody, or if it was his last day as a senior, he was the same. Always excited about playing football and brought the same thing to the pros.”

***

11109280.jpg?fit=bounds&crop=620:320,off

(Photo: Tashard Choice)

Choice goes out of his way when talking to his Texas running back room NOT to let them know how he really feels about their talent.

“As a running back, you get a lot of glitz and glamour. You have Bijan getting Heisman talk. You have Roschon, Keilan and Jonathon Brooks, and those guys work their tails off. Most of the time, I don’t let ‘em know how good I really think they are.

“I tell ‘em all the time they’re sorry as hell. And I tell them they’re sorry as hell as players, and I’m sorry as hell as a coach and that we’ve got a lot of work to do.”

Privately, he calls his running backs the “Bad Boys.”

“When you have a room like that where guys are constantly competing with each other and they work, it’s very impressive,” Choice said. “A guy like Jaydon Blue is understanding what it means to work because of how Bijan Robinson, Roschon Johnson, Keilan Robinson and Jonathon Brooks go about it.

“I try to teach those guys not to think just in college. You’re competing with guys who are in the NFL and with guys who are coming in behind you. So you have to get better every day or you will get caught.”

***

11095319.jpg?fit=bounds&crop=620:320,off

(Photo: Brian Bahr, Getty)

On Choice’s official visit to Oklahoma as a three-star 2003 recruit out of Hampton, Ga., on the south side of Atlanta, he fell in love with how hard everyone worked.

“I did my official visit during the week,” Choice said. “So I saw how the guys worked at practice and in the weight room. It was all about football. And if you’re a competitor and want to get better, you better be willing to work.

“That’s the one thing I continue to preach that changed my life — the hard work and the mindset that you can’t become mentally tougher until you become physically tough first. Once you grasp that, now you’re mentally able to handle being tired. You’re able to handle when things are not good, to push through.”

Choice redshirted as a freshman at OU in 2003 only to have a force of nature in Peterson show up as a freshman in 2004. Peterson ran the ball 339 times for 1,925 yards (5.7 yards per carry) and 15 touchdowns while becoming a Heisman Trophy finalist that season.

“AD (Peterson) is still one of my closest friends,” Choice said. “Like just watching him, how hard he worked. The thing I say a lot is how hard you work outweighs your talent. And for a guy that talented, he worked harder than his talent. That’s when you become great. That’s the same way I feel about Calvin Johnson, who I think is the best football player I ever played with.

“It’s like when you see those guys and they work like they’re the worst football player on the team. They’re always hungry and always work and give you everything they’ve got every single day and they’re already super uber-talented. Those are the guys who are different.”

11095332.jpg?fit=bounds&crop=620:320,off

(Photo: Mike Zarrilli/WireImage, Getty)

Choice got a hardship waiver to transfer to Georgia Tech and be eligible immediately for the 2005 season, because his mother and biggest inspiration, Rosa Hamm, had suffered a leg injury, and Choice wanted to get closer to home.

“My mom is the toughest person I know. She taught me to be tough,” Choice said, adding that his mom worked two jobs while raising two boys and “always put us first.”

She once baked 24 of her trademark pot pies for her son’s Georgia Tech offensive linemen after Choice ran for 204 yards in a victory over Miami in 2007.

“I still talk to my mom about every big decision I make,” Choice said.

At Georgia Tech, Choice led the ACC in rushing as a junior in 2006 (1,473 yards) and as a senior in 2007 (1,379 yards) and spent every day at practice watching another force of nature — Calvin Johnson — at work.

“I didn’t get a chance to play with Calvin in the pros, but at Georgia Tech, no one was gonna run faster or work harder,” Choice said of Johnson, who ran a 4.35 40-yard at the NFL combine as a 6-foot-5-inch receiver. “He gave you everything he’s got, every day and he was probably the best player I’ve ever seen.

“Every day in practice was just mind-blowing. I may have seen him drop one pass, and the catch would’ve been an unbelievable catch. But he made the spectacular catches seem normal. So when he made the spectacular catch, he was like, ‘I’m supposed to do that.’

“And he didn’t want all the flowers. He just wanted to ball and play with his teammates and ball out. That’s what I respected the most.”

***

10708971.JPG?fit=bounds&crop=620:320,off

(Photo: Mike Roach, 247Sports)

When Steve Sarkisian reached out to Choice about the possibility of replacing Stan Drayton as Texas’ running backs coach when Drayton was named the head coach at Temple, Choice called it “a match made in heaven.”

“I was fired up because I knew the state of Texas, where I’d been since 2008,” Choice said. “So, I knew the area, knew a lot of people in the big recruiting hubs in Texas, having been with the Cowboys and at North Texas. So, it was a natural fit for me.”

Choice also had been studying the work of Sarkisian while serving as Georgia Tech’s running backs coach the last three seasons.

“When I was at Georgia Tech, we used to watch a lot of Alabama games to see what he (Sarkisian) was doing,” Choice said. “And I heard nothing but good things about him. I was fired up. It was like a match made in heaven. I was ecstatic.”

When Sarkisian was asked about the hire of Choice, the first thing the second-year Texas head coach mentioned was Choice’s energy.

“He’s got an unbelievable amount of energy,” Sarkisian said. “Great recruiter. Great technician at the position. I think this guy provides a lot to our staff internally and in relationship to the players.”

Bijan Robinson, who was very close to Drayton and picked Texas largely based upon his relationship and trust in Drayton, immediately connected with Choice.

“I love Coach Choice,” Robinson said. “We hit it off right off the bat. Just his faith. I’m a big faith guy. God is my everything, and same for him. We talk about the word every single day. And just his energy. You can feel his presence out there, because he’s gonna be the loudest one out there.”

***

Littrell said while Choice was at North Texas, even as an unpaid volunteer assistant in 2016, he got to work early and put a Bible verse on the desks of football staffers.

“His faith — we spent a lot of time in Bible study and reading through the word,” Littrell said. “He came every day, grinded it out and had great ideas. The connection he made with the players, that was the big thing. He’s passionate about helping people get to where they want to go and making people better and allowing people to make him better. That’s who he is.”

Littrell said people sleep on Choice’s sense of humor.

“He has an ability to bring people in because he’s obviously knowledgeable,” Littrell said. “But he’s also hilarious. He’s one of the funniest human beings I’ve ever been around. So he has a knack for being able to lighten situations and bring people in, which is phenomenal.”

Littrell said Choice and former North Texas offensive line coach Brad Davis (now at LSU) were the comic relief of the UNT coaching staff from 2016-18.

“Get Tashard and Brad Davis together in a room, and they’d maybe defeat Chris Rock in terms of hilarity,” Littrell said.

***

11109284.jpg?fit=bounds&crop=620:320,off

(Photo: Tashard Choice)

Choice recruits South Dallas, Georgia, the Florida panhandle and south Florida (primarily the Miami area) for Texas.

He has a reputation as a great recruiter. So what makes a great recruiter in Choice’s mind?

“You have to understand what you’re looking for,” he said. “When I was with the Cowboys, I used to spend a lot of time with the scouting department about what would they look for in a player? That’s the first thing I had to learn.

“When you’re around pro athletes all the time, you know when a guy has it. But to learn how they dissect every single player and what they look for — as far as football IQ, reactionary recovery, skills, how easily you can bend, your movement patterns and physicality — I learned that from the scouting department.

“So, you have to know what you’re looking for, but then you have to be able to connect with people and figure out who people are. You have to have people skills. Some kids may not talk much. So you have to see how they interact with their team, with their coaches and then have them in a setting by themselves to figure out who the player really is. You have to talk to their coaches, family and friends and do extensive research to make sure you know all about the kid and see them in live action.

“When I’m on the road recruiting, that’s all I do is try to communicate. I’m seeing the kids at practice and talking to the coaches and when I meet with the kids I’m trying to be as open, honest and transparent as I possibly can so they understand who they’re getting as a coach. And I want to understand who I’m getting as a player, and I never lie to ‘em. I always shoot ‘em straight whether they want to hear it or not. If I can get him or not, I always shoot him straight. Whether they like what you say or they don’t, players respect the truth.”

***

Choice said the hardest-working players he ever suited up with were Terrell Owens (with the Cowboys), Calvin Johnson and former Cowboys tight end Jason Witten.

“Terrell was an extremist. He didn’t take anything for granted,” Choice said. “I remember one time I got home from practice and I called him, and this joker — after a full practice — was in the gym working out at night.

“That overwork is what made him better than everybody. That’s what he needed to thrive on when the competition was it’s hottest or when the moment was the biggest and in the bottom of his heart, he knew, ‘I done outworked you.’ He trained himself like that for years. It’s still part of who he is.”

Choice said Owens and Johnson both worked their tails off and couldn’t be more different from a personality standpoint.

“Calvin was very particular about the way he caught the football, his details, but he did it so quietly,” Choice said. “He was totally different from Terrell, because he was so quiet.

“In recruiting, I may see some receivers who are more flamboyant and then others who don’t say a word. But they both may be trained to go. So, being around those great players, you learn that there’s more than one way to go about it. There’s different ways to be great, so you have to look for the details.”

***

11062349.jpg?fit=bounds&crop=620:320,off

(Photo: Tim Warner, Getty)

When you ask Choice to break down the strengths and weaknesses of Bijan Robinson’s game, he says:

“What stands out is his body control. His balance. The kid has elite movement skills. His initial quicks are rare. They’re elite. When he plays with good balance and pad level and plays violently because he’s 220 and attacks tacklers and refuses to go down, when he does that — and can do it on a consistent basis — that’s what makes him different. He has natural catch ability. He can catch the football. He has to work on being better away from the football. He has to work on his blocking skills and being a three-down back.

“Watching him and watching him improve from the start of spring to the end of spring ball was very impressive, because that means he’s coachable and that he works at it and when he sees things that he doesn’t like, it bothers him.

“Like that fumble I told you about against Washington. That crap still bothers me. If a running back sees something he doesn’t like, it means he’ll work to get better.”

When asked to break down Roschon Johnson, Choice says:

“Roschon is the guy — if I got in a fight, he’s the guy I’d want next to me because Ro is one of those dudes who some might say overtrains, like Terrell Owens. Roschon has worked his way into being one heck of a football player. He works. He grinds. He’s a core special teams guy for us. The kid is a student of the game as well, and he competes.

“He’s one of the leaders for the team and his respect factor throughout the whole team, you can see why everyone in that facility loves him. You want a whole team of Roschons because he’ll do everything for you. How he’s built and how him and Bijan help the younger backs like Jonathon Brooks and Jaydon Blue and Keilan doing the same, he’s someone I respect.

“And when I tell them guys I respect them, it means you don’t take this game lightly. This game of football means something to you. He’s a heck of a football player, and I can’t wait to see him play this year.”

Gailey isn’t surprised Choice has become a rising star football coach.

“He has great enthusiasm for the game,” Gailey said. “He’s excited about competition and he’s smart. And he can handle himself in the public eye, which isn’t easy for everybody.

“A lot of guys can go out on the field and play, but can you stand up and talk to booster groups and alumni? He can do that, too.”

Littrell, a running back on Oklahoma’s national championship team in 2000, said Choice’s time at OU helped prepare him to become an excellent coach.

“If you’re going to play at Oklahoma, especially at that time under Bob Stoops and (strength coach) Jerry Schmidt, you were going to have a strong work ethic,” Littrell said. “You were going to grind and be a team player. A lot of our fit came from how we were raised in this profession as players and as people. We had a lot of the same mentors and philosophies about what it’s supposed to look like.”

Kitna is convinced Choice will be an offensive coordinator soon and then a head coach.

“One of the sayings we use is: ‘If you’re juiceless, you’re useless.’ And he has it every day,” Kitna said of Choice. “There’s days he doesn’t feel like it, but he still has it. He’s the ultimate team guy and wants to see everyone do great, even if that means he has to take a lesser role.

“He has a thirst for knowledge. The amount of times we’d get on the phone whether he was at North Texas or Georgia Tech and just talked ball, he just has a growth mindset. He relates to kids. He’s a relationship builder.

“His running back rooms are going to be tighter than any group on the field maybe with the exception of the offensive linemen. And on top of that, he sees the game like a quarterback. He was always one of the smartest guys on the field.”

Kitna said he can’t wait for Choice to become a head coach “because I’m hoping I get to coach for him.”

“There’s certain people you’ll follow, and he’s one of them,” Kitna said. “I could be a coach under him, because that’s what kind of a guy he is. I love Tashard like he’s flesh and blood. I just think he has everything an organization is looking for. That’s why he’s highly sought after. He’s a relationship builder, got character, Xs and Os, growth mindset.

“He’s got it all.”

 

  • Hook 'Em 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ramonce Taylor end around for a TD every time and Goal Line Henry Melton would like a word with you
 
Also JC being #2 behind Young was a reflection of coaching not a reflection of the players. So I disregard that data point entirely.
 
 
Tiers in terms of talent shown in 05 vs 21
Bijan
JC
-
Taylor
-
Johnson
-
Young
-
Keilan
-
Brooks/Melton at this point who cares
 
it's arguing over split hairs, but it's end of May so nothing better to do. I take the 05 group over last years, basically because I like the combo of JC and Taylor very slightly more than Bijan Rojo. Both are luxury's to have in the RB room. I'm also a massive JC stan that thinks he's one of the best RB's ever so yeah

With JC, it’s difficult to say you’d take another backfield, but I’d go last year’s/this years.

No one is more physically gifted than Ramonce Taylor, but in my opinion he should have been WR. See Ohio State TD catch. His desire to take it to the house led to some negative plays out of the backfield. Even at WR, you could still get him the ball out of the backfield. Honestly, I don’t remember but I’d guess he was limited in pass pro.

S Young had mediocre numbers. He didn’t possess any skill that stood out. But he was a solid all around player.

Melton was largely a big guy who was quick for his size. He had some talent, but there’s a reason he moved positions. And I don’t think anyone of the top 4 for 21-22 do not score versus Ohio State.

For 21-22, I’d say the “talent” of JC and RT are greater than Bijan and RoJo, but the latter are complimentary and more well rounded. RoJo is probably the least talented from a metrics standpoint but he’s a football player in every sense of the word. They are more versatile - you can go 2 back, you can wildcat, you can do it 1st and 10, you can do it 4th and 1.

Then Keilan is actually a compliment to RT from a speed and quickness standpoint. He’s also a great compliment to Bijan and RoJo. I don’t think he’s starter, 3 down back material, but that’s not what he’s here for. He’s here to compliment the offense with some explosiveness.

So that’s where Brooks comes in. If our first two go down, he’s getting tons of opportunities. He’s a more natural runner than Melton and more fluid than SY. He seems mature and plays hard.

Our current group is a mature, well rounded and complimentary group. They’re willing blockers. They can get you a yard when needed. They can catch a pass. They break tackles and can make people miss. Collectively, they can do all you’d ask of them.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like this group of backs a lot, but the difference in surrounding talent makes it very hard to judge which group was better.

 

Ramonce would have started at most D1 colleges as an RB in 2005. 
 

 

Selvin Young is probably analogous to RoJo (RoJo has more power, Selvin more quicks. Speed is similar).

 

Jamaal was a fucking super stud.

Bijan is (IMO) the best pure RB we’ve had since Ricky Williams. But his OL ain’t all that good and his QB(s) was/were dog shit. Plus he’s had freak injury issues both seasons at TEXAS.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I recall yelling sometnig along the lines of "dude, you're huge, just fucking turn up field" at the TV when Melton was trying to stretch out the LOS and tippy toe into the end zone before getting stuffed. He was not a good big back, but he turned out to be a good fast Dlineman. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



×
×
  • Create New...