Jump to content

Winter Brisket


next2naus
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm thinking about how make my life easier w.r.t. smoking a brisket on my stick burner this winter. And I stumbled across this video and it got me thinking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MUMmIedzwo

Concern: I live in NY and I want to minimize my time outdoors tending the fire, adding wood, etc. Smoking a Brisket takes time....I have two little kids, so less time eye balling the smoker means more time w/ them.

Has anyone used any of those long burning charcoals? Charblox or Bincho Grill as example?  

Thinking adding those to some Hickory (burns longer than Mesquite or Oak in my experience) and Meater probes to remotely monitor heat/temp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/18/2022 at 7:59 PM, CooterBrown said:

You could change your technique and do a hot and fast smoke at 300+ degrees. Cut the time in the smoker in half. What matters is the following long rest of 12+ hours in an oven at 150 degrees.

interesting, I've contemplated 6 six hours on the smoker (heard that after 4 hours its there is no more "smoke" value, just low cooking") then oven to finish for 8 to 10 hours at 150

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know most will call it blasphemy, but based on a rec from a chef buddy of mine, 2 weekends ago I did a brisket flat in my sous vide for 36 hours at 155. Then it went in the fridge for 2 days, and I finished it for 4 hours in the smoke and served it. It was the best flat I have tasted outside of Franklin/Leroy&Lewis/Valentinas, and was dare I say on par. Texture was perfect, and did not suffer from the drying out of other stand alone flats I had smoked to entirety before. I’m actually going to do an entire brisket for Christmas this way, so I don’t have to sacrifice the time as well. I’ll try and remember to check back in here after I do it, but if it is even close to the quality of the flat I did, it will be amazing.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, next2naus said:

interesting, I've contemplated 6 six hours on the smoker (heard that after 4 hours its there is no more "smoke" value, just low cooking") then oven to finish for 8 to 10 hours at 150

Depending on how much time I have, I will throw a brisket on after dinner, and let it smoke until 1 or 2 a.m.  Then wrap and stick it in the oven at 205, go to bed, and let it cook in there all night.  Pull it out to rest a couple of hours before serving.  Works well.

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, UnivTex34 said:

I know most will call it blasphemy, but based on a rec from a chef buddy of mine, 2 weekends ago I did a brisket flat in my sous vide for 36 hours at 155. Then it went in the fridge for 2 days, and I finished it for 4 hours in the smoke and served it. It was the best flat I have tasted outside of Franklin/Leroy&Lewis/Valentinas, and was dare I say on par. Texture was perfect, and did not suffer from the drying out of other stand alone flats I had smoked to entirety before. I’m actually going to do an entire brisket for Christmas this way, so I don’t have to sacrifice the time as well. I’ll try and remember to check back in here after I do it, but if it is even close to the quality of the flat I did, it will be amazing.

BLASPHEMY!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, conVINCEd said:

Depending on how much time I have, I will throw a brisket on after dinner, and let it smoke until 1 or 2 a.m.  Then wrap and stick it in the oven at 205, go to bed, and let it cook in there all night.  Pull it out to rest a couple of hours before serving.  Works well.

caddyshack-ted-knight.gif

 

 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, conVINCEd said:

Nothing to do with winter, everything to do with getting some sleep and serving lunch.  I’m too fucking old to sit up all night tending a fire.

And that, sir, is the the conversation I've had with myself every time I think about upgrading to a stick burner from the WSM.  It's just too easy for me to get the thing going, get the meat on, get a good night's sleep, wake up, and it's time to wrap.  And with the addition of the temp controller, I can keep it running low all night so I'm sure to get some good sleep.

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, dcbc said:

And that, sir, is the the conversation I've had with myself every time I think about upgrading to a stick burner from the WSM.  It's just too easy for me to get the thing going, get the meat on, get a good night's sleep, wake up, and it's time to wrap.  And with the addition of the temp controller, I can keep it running low all night so I'm sure to get some good sleep.

I started on a WSM.  If the electronics were better back then I would’ve probably stuck with that, and maybe bought a second.   I mainly upgraded for capacity.  I haven’t been cooking much lately, but the after dinner, stick in oven, go to bed thing works for me.  I get my outside smoker time with brown water, I sleep, and people get good food at lunch.

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nothing to do with winter, everything to do with getting some sleep and serving lunch.  I’m too fucking old to sit up all night tending a fire.

Make it even easier. Start at noon and pull it off around 10pm. Put it in a counter top toaster oven or turkey roaster at 150 degrees until noon the next day.

Go watch Chud BBQ videos on the foil boat method. You won’t bother doing it any other way again. It’s so easy and reliable.
  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, CooterBrown said:


Make it even easier. Start at noon and pull it off around 10pm. Put it in a counter top toaster oven or turkey roaster at 150 degrees until noon the next day.

Go watch Chud BBQ videos on the foil boat method. You won’t bother doing it any other way again. It’s so easy and reliable.

You squeezing a 15 lb brisket into a toaster oven?  I’ve got a Ninja and I ain’t getting a brisket in there.

  • Hook 'Em 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pellet grills do a really good job of holding temps in northern winters, if you're willing to go that route.  I use mine all winter and don't really see a dramatic difference in time or pellet usage between 100 degrees and 10 degrees outside temperature.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/21/2022 at 9:47 PM, conVINCEd said:

Current only goes down to 200. I’ll need to pull up the manual on the soon to be oven to see how low it goes.  I was not the primary decision maker on that appliance.

Most conventional ovens' lowest setting is 170... that's typically what it hits for the "warm" function.

 

Edited by oSuJeff97
  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, oSuJeff97 said:

Most conventional ovens' lowest setting is 170... that's typically what it hits for the "warm" function.

 

Some of the newer ones will do 145 on a "warm" setting.   Our old one would only go down to 170, which was anywhere between 170--210F on the probe we used to test it.

Edited by dcbc
  • Hook 'Em 1
  • Rage+1 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/21/2022 at 4:38 PM, conVINCEd said:

Depending on how much time I have, I will throw a brisket on after dinner, and let it smoke until 1 or 2 a.m.  Then wrap and stick it in the oven at 205, go to bed, and let it cook in there all night.  Pull it out to rest a couple of hours before serving.  Works well.

do you wrap and rest in a cooler?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/21/2022 at 3:38 PM, conVINCEd said:

Depending on how much time I have, I will throw a brisket on after dinner, and let it smoke until 1 or 2 a.m.  Then wrap and stick it in the oven at 205, go to bed, and let it cook in there all night.  Pull it out to rest a couple of hours before serving.  Works well.

Pulled this off over the last 24 hours trying the foil boat method for the first time.

easily top 5 brisket I’ve ever done.

on the WSM at 6:30pm (12.5 lber after trim)

smoked for 6 hours until 12:30am, 155 degrees.

Would have preferred to put on earlier and get more smoke time, but pulled then and put in the boat.

In the oven at 230 degrees with a small sauce pan of water. Cooked this way until it was done around 8am.

Took it out of the oven and in a cooler (still in the boat) letting it rest down to ~160 degrees which took about 2.5 hours, to 10:30am.

Wasn’t going to eat until the evening, so back in the oven on warm/170 degree setting

stayed there the rest of the day (taking a break for an hour back in the cooler while transporting to the parents house) until time to slice and serve ~6:30pm.


incredibly tender and definitely the  crispiest bark I’ve ever created on a brisket 

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...