Jump to content
tbone_

Top 100 debut albums of all time per Rolling Stone

Recommended Posts

14 minutes ago, Chad Fuck said:

The subtitle should be “according to the 25 yr old who wrote this.”

I recall when RS did their top 500 list. It has tons of stuff before my time, but was written with a sense of history that I could appreciate. If it was written by someone my age with no send of history, Nevermind would’ve been #1.

This is how this particular list strikes me. Someone just above intern got handed the task because no one else really wanted it. That person thought music began a few years before he was born when the Beasties arrived. Even the Beasties would agree they shouldn’t be at the top of this list.

You aren't qualified to even compile that list if you're under 50 (in 99 out of 100 cases), and I'd argue maybe 60 is a better age to know the history accurately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Strokes at #8?

Get the fuck out of here with that shit.  I mean, I like that album, but the Strokes were 95% marketing genius and 5% good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Onboard 2.0 said:

You aren't qualified to even compile that list if you're under 50 (in 99 out of 100 cases), and I'd argue maybe 60 is a better age to know the history accurately.

I probably sounded a little more ageist than I meant.  I think someone of any age could've written a better list if they had the background.  Hell, The University of Texas gave me an A+ in rock history before I could buy my own beer.  

In any case, someone from Rolling Stone should have the necessary context to know that while License to Ill is a great record, it is probably not the GRETEST ROCK DEBUT OF ALL TIMEZ!!!  I think we probably agree on this.  

Edited by Chad Fuck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Chad Fuck said:

I probably sounded a little more ageist than I meant.  I think someone of any age could've written a better list if they had the background.  Hell, The University of Texas gave me an A+ in rock history before I could buy my own beer.  

In any case, someone from Rolling Stone should have the necessary context to know that while License to Ill is a great record, it is probably not the GRETEST ROCK DEBUT OF ALL TIMEZ!!!  I think we probably agree on this.  

I think to compile greatest of all time lists you need to have experienced the greatest when it was happening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Onboard 2.0 said:

I think to compile greatest of all time lists you need to have experienced the greatest when it was happening.

On this I disagree.  The entirety of "Rock" has taken place in the post war period.  The beginning is still within living memory.  But not for long.  Does that mean you can't write about greats after the last person who experienced Elvis (or Buddy Holly, or Chuck Berry, or The Beatles...etc.) does?  Of course not. 

Put it in the context of literature:  we can makes lists of the greatest novels long after the authors and original readers of Moby Dick have passed.  The same analogy would work for any art form.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One's view of "greatest" would be highly clouded by when you were in your teens/20s without the proper context.  It's exactly why we have License to Ill here at #1.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This reminds me of earlier days when I paid attention to music press, and UK writers were always trying to hype the latest band of the moment as the greatest ever (Stone Roses, The Farm, etc.).  They were massively obsessed with having English bands break big in the US -- it was very Aggie-esque.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Chad Fuck said:

On this I disagree.  The entirety of "Rock" has taken place in the post war period.  The beginning is still within living memory.  But not for long.  Does that mean you can't write about greats after the last person who experienced Elvis (or Buddy Holly, or Chuck Berry, or The Beatles...etc.) does?  Of course not. 

Put it in the context of literature:  we can makes lists of the greatest novels long after the authors and original readers of Moby Dick have passed.  The same analogy would work for any art form.

 

No I concede that point, but when you see some of the things that make these lists that on their best days couldn't hold a candle to the bands that were truly great and innovative for their times it cause you to scratch your head in wonder.

It's sorta like people who won't watch black, and white movies. Their entire reference on whether its good or bad is related to color, or lack of it on film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, jimmyjazz said:

This reminds me of earlier days when I paid attention to music press, and UK writers were always trying to hype the latest band of the moment as the greatest ever (Stone Roses, The Farm, etc.).  They were massively obsessed with having English bands break big in the US -- it was very Aggie-esque.

Are the Soup Dragons the new Rolling Stones for the 90s!?!?!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Chad Fuck said:

Are the Soup Dragons the new Rolling Stones for the 90s!?!?!  

Egg-zactly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hell, The University of Texas gave me an A+ in rock history before I could buy my own beer.


Old man would never let me take that class. You’ve lost your mind if you think I’m paying for that, he said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Onboard 2.0 said:

I think to compile greatest of all time lists you need to have experienced the greatest when it was happening.

This is like saying you can't be a great art historian if you weren't around for the last several thousand years to experience the art as it was happening.

As if that art and those albums don't still exist?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TexArcher said:

This is like saying you can't be a great art historian if you weren't around for the last several thousand years to experience the art as it was happening.

As if that art and those albums don't still exist?

I'd say art historians are generally much better at art identification than some 20' something picking a list of all time great rock and roll.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Onboard 2.0 said:

I'd say art historians are generally much better at art identification than some 20' something picking a list of all time great rock and roll.

Well, sure.  And I don't think it's Rolling Stone's intention to offer an expert opinion, or they would have used a 20th century music scholar, and they clearly didn't.  As I mentioned earlier, this list reeks of clickbait trolling in the "you won't believe what Skip and Shannon said this time!" vein.

And here we are, making it work...

Edited by TexArcher

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Old man would never let me take that class. You’ve lost your mind if you think I’m paying for that, he said.


My old man was a rocker. So he got it. Also, I was on scholarship so....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My life as a teenage scalper, hard partier, bar rat and general leading edge music lover that made me go to work at Club Foot. I ended up getting in on a lot of those debut album tours! Debut tours IN bold

98-  Joe Jackson- Look Sharp!  1979 My dad won tix to him on the radio and didn't know who he was. Dive in Houston, maybe white horse?  Show was awesome and have followed him even as his presentations have changed over the years

81- Gang of 4 - this is one I am not completely about but I am pretty sure I saw them at club foot or this bar congress i cant remember

76 - Devo- some outdoor gig in Dallas I think

75- The GoGo's - Beauty and the Beat - 1981 at Club Foot, killer concert, one of the better ones I saw at Da Foot.  Seems like they were about to drop a new album at the time.

68- talking Heads - not sure where but remember live glimses in my head

64- the English Beat - I just can't stop it! club foot

52 - U2-  Boy - Killed it at Club Foot. I loved that album and played it on repeat because it was so different back then.

50 X- can't remember where I saw them but club foot or maybe oprey house, but i saw them really fucked up.

45- Television - want to say club foot probably first tour 

44 Black Sabbath- I ended up walking out Houston Coliseum but saw Van Halen (see 27)

39 Lynard Skynard - but it was after the crash

37 - Springsteen multiple shows but none ever again as good as my surpise invite while in Galveston to go see Springsteen that night? looked  it up it was may 1978) I maxed out on tix for the December '78 show with Santa Clause is Coming to town being my fondest memory of that show.

30 Artic Monkeys - a surprise walk up at ACL and been a fan ever since

28 - B 52's - B-52's For some reason I want to say Austin Oprey house rather than club foot

27- Van Halen - Van Halen-  they opend for sabbath and jucking killed it.  Made Sabbath sound like dog shit afterwards, but probably ozzie...

20 - joy division - likley club foot 

16  the Cars -The cars seems like it was with Eric Johnson? Houston  but smaller venue maybe music hall 

15 Arcade Fire- ACL

13 Pretenders - Pretenders -can't reemember who opend that one up, must have been the Austin Opera house. Loved Crissy's voice and bad girl lyrics. 

12 The Clash - The Clash great show at the Austin Coliseum, think it was moved there from Opera House for some reason, hell of a show.

8 The Strokes (might have seen earlier) but for sure at Auditorium shores for the "riot show" where a fence got bushed down.

2) Ramones - honestly cannot remember where I was toasted but good think I want to say hole it the wall, but who the fuck knows!

All in all a pretty good list of shows.  I owe a lot of it to my affinity in high school to take my cash buy my max 10 tix and sell them to my friends with a very slight surcharge to cover my date's ticket, and bmayber part of mine. Still remember trying to get Springsteen tix at ticketmaster in the Galleria for Springsteen. They opend an hour earlier than the Foley's near my house and I did some math on the line in front, and Hauled ass back to the Memorial City Foley's to try to get in line there.  I was sort of in the second row of folks pushing at the door and we all raced in.  I was hauling ass running and the guy in front of me tried to cut back in front to stop me from passing him and I just eased him into some manniquiens to end up third in line. Front Row upper balcony for the Boss at the Summit.

Club Foot was an awesome place to work wehre I was a bar back and occassional bar tender if I could ever get a shift. I was spending so much cash going to shows I figured working their would save me more than I would earn.  Ahh... to be young again.  Oh well gonna add Kurt Vile to the concert list this week!

Go see some live music. Wonder what my stubs would be worth if I saved them all?  

 

 

 

Edited by horn4life

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, horn4life said:

My life as a teenage scalper,

 

 

Edited by jimmyjazz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haven't seen it mentioned, but did Pretty Hate Machine make the list at all?

 

edit: 58, not bad.

Edited by MoJames

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

List

100 ‘The Fame’ Lady Gaga

99 ‘The Gilded Palace of Sin’ The Flying Burrito Brothers

98 ‘Look Sharp!’ Joe Jackson

97 ‘Endtroducing….’ DJ Shadow

96 ‘Madonna’ Madonna

95 ‘Here’s Little Richard’ Little Richard

94 ‘The Who Sings My Generation’ The Who

93 ‘Almost Killed Me’ The Hold Steady

92 ‘Moby Grape’ Moby Grape

91 ‘Arular’ M.I.A.

90 ‘#1 Record’ Big Star

89 ‘Upstairs at Eric’s’ Yaz

88 ‘Homework’ Daft Punk

87 ‘Mass Romantic’ The New Pornographers

86 ‘good kid, m.A.A.d city’ Kendrick Lamar

85 ‘Rage Against the Machine’ Rage Against the Machine

84 ‘Whitney Houston’ Whitney Houston

83 ‘Paid In Full’ Erik B. and Rakim

82 ‘Heart of the Congos’ The Congos

81 ‘Entertainment!’ Gang of Four

80 ‘Mr. Tambourine Man’ The Byrds

79 ‘Elvis Presley’ Elvis Presley

78 ‘The Stone Roses’ The Stone Roses

77 ‘Thank Me Later’ Drake

76 ‘Are We Not Men? We Are Devo!’ Devo

75 ‘Beauty and the Beat’ The Go-Go's

74 ‘xx’ The xx

73 ‘Come Away with Me’ Norah Jones

72 ‘Led Zeppelin’ Led Zeppelin

71 ‘What’s the 411’ Mary J. Blige

70 ‘Dry’ PJ Harvey

69 ‘Pink Flag’ Wire

68 ‘Talking Heads: 77′ Talking Heads

67 ‘Get Rich or Die Tryin’ 50 Cent

66 ‘The Stooges’ The Stooges

65 ‘Exile In Guyville’ Liz Phair

64 ‘I Just Can’t Stop It’ The English Beat

63 ‘She’s So Unusual’ Cyndi Lauper

62 ‘Roxy Music’ Roxy Music

61 ‘Up the Bracket’ The Libertines

60 ‘Tidal’ Fiona Apple

59 ‘Fever to Tell’ Yeah Yeah Yeahs

58 ‘Pretty Hate Machine’ Nine Inch Nails

57 ‘Oracular Spectacular’ MGMT

56 ‘For Emma, Forever Ago’ Bon Iver

55 ‘Supa Dupa Fly’ Missy "Misdemeanor" Elliott

54 ‘Kill ‘Em All’ Metallica

53 ‘New York Dolls’ New York Dolls

52 ‘Boy’ U2

51 ‘The Smiths’ The Smiths

50 ‘Los Angeles’ X

49 ‘Franz Ferdinand’ Franz Ferdinand

48 ‘Modern Lovers’ Modern Lovers

47 ‘Piper At the Gates of Dawn’ Pink Floyd

46 ‘Ten’ Pearl Jam

45 ‘Psychocandy’ The Jesus & Mary Chain

44 ‘Black Sabbath’ Black Sabbath

43 ‘Grace’ Jeff Buckley

42 ‘Definitely Maybe’ Oasis

41 ‘Boston’ Boston

40 ‘Marquee Moon’ Television

39 ‘(Pronounced ‘Lĕh-‘nérd ‘Skin-‘nérd)’ Lynyrd Skynyrd

38 ‘Outlandos d’Amour’ The Police

37 ‘Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J.’ Bruce Springsteen

36 ‘Give Up’ Postal Service

35 ‘Weezer’ Weezer

34 ‘The Doors’ The Doors

33 ‘Hot Fuss’ The Killers

32 ‘Three Feet High And Rising’ De La Soul

31 ‘Dummy’ Portishead

30 ‘Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not’ Arctic Monkeys

29 ‘Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)’ Wu-Tang Clan

28 ‘B-52s’ The B-52's

27 ‘Van Halen’ Van Halen

26 ‘Run-DMC’ Run-D.M.C.

25 ‘Slanted and Enchanted’ Pavement

24 ‘Vampire Weekend’ Vampire Weekend

23 ‘Ready to Die’ The Notorious B.I.G.

22 ‘Violent Femmes’ Violent Femmes

21 ‘My Aim Is True’ Elvis Costello

20 ‘Unknown Pleasures’ Joy Division

19 ‘The College Dropout’ Kanye West

18 ‘Murmur’ R.E.M.

17 ‘Please Please Me’ The Beatles

16 ‘The Cars’ The Cars

15 ‘Funeral’  Arcade Fire

14 ‘Reasonable Doubt’ Jay-Z

13 ‘Pretenders’ The Pretenders

12 ‘The Clash’ The Clash

11 ‘Illmatic’ Nas

10 ‘Horses’ Patti Smith
Arista 1975

From its first defiant line, "Jesus died for somebody's sins, but not mine," the opening shot in a bold reinvention of Van Morrison's garage-rock classic "Gloria," Smith's debut album was a declaration of committed mutiny, a statement of faith in the transfigurative powers of rock & roll. Horses made her the queen of punk, but Smith cared more for the poetry in rock. She sought the visions and passions that connected Keith Richards and Rimbaud – and found them, with the intuitive assistance of a killing band (pianist Richard Sohl, guitarist Lenny Kaye, bassist Ivan Kral and drummer Jay Dee Daugherty) and her friend Robert Mapplethorpe, who shot the cover portrait.

9 ‘Music From Big Pink’ The Band
Capitol, 1968

Every rootsy rock guy ever owes something to this record, a bold embrace of American tradition and down-to-earth simplicity released into an era of protest and psychedelia. "Big Pink" was a pink house in Woodstock, New York, where the Band – Dylan's '65-66 backup band on tour – moved to be near Dylan after his motorcycle accident. While he recuperated, the Band backed him on the demos later known as The Basement Tapes and made its own debut. Dylan offered to play on the album; the Band said no thanks. "We didn't want to just ride his shirttail," drummer Levon Helm said. Dylan contributed "I Shall Be Released" and co-wrote two other tunes. But it was the rustic beauty of the Band's music and the incisive drama of its own reflections on family and obligations, such as "The Weight," that made Big Pink an instant homespun classic.

8 ‘Is This It’ The Strokes
RCA 2001

Few bands have packaged themselves as brilliantly as the Strokes on their debut. Before Is This It even came out, New York's mod ragamuffins were overnight sensations, jumping from Avenue A to press hysteria and the inevitable backlash, all inside a year. Julian Casablancas, guitarists Nick Valensi and Albert Hammond Jr., bassist Nikolai Fraiture and drummer Fabrizio Moretti were primed for star time, updating the propulsion of the Velvet Underground and the jangle of Seventies punk with Casablancas' acidic dispatches from last night's wreckage. They inspired a ragged revolt in Britain, led by the Libertines and Arctic Monkeys, and reverberated back home with the Kings of Leon. And for the bristling half-hour of Is This It, New York's shadows sounded vicious and exciting again.

7 ‘Never Mind the Bollocks’ The Sex Pistols
Warner Bros. 1977

"If the sessions had gone the way I wanted, it would have been unlistenable for most people," Johnny Rotten said. "I guess it's the very nature of music: If you want people to listen, you're going to have to compromise." But few heard it that way at the time; The Pistols' only studio album terrified a whole nation into scared submission. It sounds like a rejection of everything rock & roll – and the world itself – had to offer. True, the music was less shocking than Rotten himself, who sang about abortions, anarchy and hatred on "Bodies" and "Anarchy in the U.K." But Never Mind . . . is the Sermon on the Mount of U.K. punk – and its echoes are everywhere.

6 ‘Straight Outta Compton’ N.W.A.
Priority 1988

This was the start of gangsta rap as well as the launching pad for the careers of Ice Cube, Eazy-E and Dr. Dre. While Public Enemy were hip-hop's political revolutionaries, N.W.A. celebrated the thug life. (A collection of Dre-produced tracks for N.W.A. and other artists had been released in 1987 under the name N.W.A. and the Posse, but this was their first real album.) "Do I look like a motherfucking role model?" Ice Cube asks on "Gangsta Gangsta": "To a kid looking up to me, life ain't nothing but bitches and money." Ice Cube's rage, combined with Dr. Dre's police-siren street beats, combined for a truly fearsome sound on "Express Yourself," "A Bitch Iz a Bitch" and "Straight Outta Compton." But it was the protest "Fuck Tha Police" that earned the crew its biggest honor: a threatening letter from the FBI.

5 ‘The Velvet Underground and Nico’ The Velvet Underground
MGM/Verve 1967

Much of what we take for granted in rock would not exist without this New York band or its debut, The Velvet Underground and Nico: the androgynous sexuality of glam; punk's raw noir; the blackened-riff howl of grunge and noise rock. It is a record of fearless breadth and lyric depth. Singer-songwriter Lou Reed documented carnal desire and drug addiction with a pop wisdom he learned as a song-factory composer for Pickwick Records. Multi-instrumentalist John Cale introduced the power of pulse and drone (from his work in early minimalism); guitarist Sterling Morrison and drummer Maureen Tucker played with tribal force; Nico, a German vocalist briefly added to the band by manager Andy Warhol, brought an icy femininity to the heated ennui in Reed's songs. Rejected as nihilistic by the love crowd in '67, the Banana Album (so named for its Warhol-designed cover), is the most prophetic rock album ever made.

4 ‘Appetite for Destruction’ Guns N' Roses
Geffen 1987

The biggest-selling debut album of the Eighties and the biggest hard-rock game-changer since Led Zeppelin IV, Appetite features a lot more than the yowl of Indiana-bred W. Axl Rose. Guitarist Slash gave the band blues emotion and punk energy, while the rhythm section brought the funk on hits such as "Welcome to the Jungle." When all the elements came together, as in the final two minutes of "Paradise City," G N' R left all other Eighties metal bands in the dust, and they knew it too. "A lot of rock bands are too fucking wimpy to have any sentiment or any emotion," Rose said. "Unless they're in pain."

3 ‘Are You Experienced’ Jimi Hendrix Experience
Reprise 1967

Every idea we have of the guitarist as groundbreaking individual artist comes from this record. It's what Britain sounded like in late 1966 and early 1967: ablaze with rainbow blues, orchestral guitar feedback and the personal cosmic vision of black American émigré Jimi Hendrix. Hendrixs incendiary guitar was historic in itself, the luminescent sum of his chitlin-circuit labors with Little Richard and the Isley Brothers and his melodic exploitation of amp howl. But it was the pictorial heat of songs like "Manic Depression" and "The Wind Cries Mary" that established the transcendent promise of psychedelia. Hendrix made soul music for inner space. "It's a collection of free feeling and imagination," he said of the album. "Imagination is very important."

2 ‘The Ramones’ The Ramones
Sire 1976

"Our early songs came out of our real feelings of alienation, isolation, frustration – the feelings everybody feels between seventeen and seventy-five," said singer Joey Ramone. Clocking in at just under twenty-nine minutes, Ramones is a complete rejection of the spangled artifice of 1970s rock and ground zero for the punk-rock revolution. The songs were fast and anti-social, just like the band: "Beat on the Brat," "Blitzkrieg Bop," "Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue." Guitarist Johnny Ramone refused to play solos – his jackhammer chords became the lingua franca of punk – and the whole record cost just over $6000 to make. But Joey's leather-tender plea "I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend" showed that even punks need love.

1 ‘Licensed to Ill’ Beastie Boys
Def Jam 1986

A statement so powerful, so fully-realized, that the Beastie Boys spent the rest of their careers living it down. Licensed to Ill created a new way for middle America to rock – with thundering combination of hip-hop beats, metal riffs and exuberant smart-aleck rhymes – even as it picked up the flag from Run-DMC and delivered rap music irrevocably into the Heartland. It would become hip-hop's first Number One album, and one of the best-selling rap album of all time. Mike D, Ad-Rock, and MCA grew out of the record's frat boy sexual politics and party hearty world view, but head-smacking hits like "(You Gotta) Fight For Your Right (To Party!)" and "Rhymin' & Stealin'", like the AC/DC and Led Zeppelin songs that were the Beasties' early touchstones, keep getting discovered by new generations of hell-raisers. It's the definition of the debut album that takes over the world: the shock of the new, with an impact that extends for decades.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, horn4life said:

My life as a teenage scalper, hard partier, bar rat and general leading edge music lover that made me go to work at Club Foot. I ended up getting in on a lot of those debut album tours! Debut tours IN bold

20 - joy division - likley club foot

Unless I'm mistaken, Joy Division never played a gig in the US. Ian Curtis committed suicide the day before the band was supposed to leave for their first-ever US tour.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, horn4life said:

75- The GoGo's - Beauty and the Beat - 1981 at Club Foot, killer concert, one of the better ones I saw at Da Foot.  Seems like they were about to drop a new album at the time.

The Go-Go's is another band that asswipe Jann Wenner refuses to allow in the Rock Hall of Fame. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, C-Man said:

Unless I'm mistaken, Joy Division never played a gig in the US. Ian Curtis committed suicide the day before the band was supposed to leave for their first-ever US tour.

VERY possible- I almost left them off along with Gang of 4, no clarity on either so perhaps brain fart. Abig  tip of the Hat to Brad First the former booking agent at Club Foot.  He got a nice pipeline going of leading edge bands and I was lucky enough to be there to see them.  I also miss the days when you did buy a complete Album with all the liner notes, and songs that didn't fit into the top 40 box.  Another tip of the Hat to rolling stone because I used to look at some of the more obscure new bands, like new York Dolls and err... Aerosmith when they were first cutting their teeth. 

Again... go see some live music guys...

Edited by horn4life

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, horn4life said:

VERY possible- I almost left them off along with Gang of 4. A tip of the Hat to Brad First the former booking agent at Club Foot.  He got a nice pipeline going of leading edge bands and I was lucky enough to be there to see them. 

You and I were probably at dozens if not hundreds of the same shows.

I distinctly recall Brad paying us $32 for every gig we played at one of his clubs.  This went on for years.  "Here's your $32, thanks for playing."  Lulz.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, jimmyjazz said:

You and I were probably at dozens if not hundreds of the same shows.

giphy.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, jimmyjazz said:

You and I were probably at dozens if not hundreds of the same shows.

I distinctly recall Brad paying us $32 for every gig we played at one of his clubs.  This went on for years.  "Here's your $32, thanks for playing."  Lulz.

Back then the big money show we loved to work was Delbert McClinton.  His crowd was older and had more cash to spend than the average Club Foot patron and thoses were the good money.  After I quit Club Foot I ended up living in the Duplex next door to two of the Steamboat 1864 bartenders, so that worked out nicely!  I lived downtown until 1999, so I got to see a shit ton of music.  Then my Dad life took over with a decade of Soccer coaching. Still managed to get my kids to the Stones in '95 and they get a few minutes of face time on the Zilker Park video.

What was you band name(s)? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, horn4life said:

What was you band name(s)? 

A bunch of shitty bands, although one (Christie Love Experience) got a sniff from Sony & Island until Butch Vig stole our singer for what became Garbage.  (He fired our singer once he saw Shirley Manson on MTV Europe.)  This was ~ 1993 and our home base was Electric Lounge, along with bands like Sixteen Deluxe and Starfish.  Spoon played there some too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...