Jump to content

ChatGpt writes American Policy


pacman
 Share

Recommended Posts

We don't get too many solutions around here, so maybe this could be fun and/or dumb. If anything, it will be a break from the usual and maybe we can get to something worth submitting. It can't be any worse than corporations writing 800 page bills.

Constitutional Amendment to Overturn Citizens United

ChatGpt

Quote

"Amendment XXVIII: The influence of corporate money on political campaigns is a threat to the integrity of our democracy. Therefore, the rights protected by the Constitution of the United States do not extend to corporations or other artificial entities established for the purpose of political spending. Congress and the states shall have the power to regulate and limit political contributions and expenditures by corporations and other artificial entities."

To compare, Adam Schiff's submission that he just re-submitted.

Quote

‘‘Nothing in this Constitution shall be construed to forbid Congress or the States from imposing reasonable viewpoint-neutral limitations on private campaign contributions or independent election expenditures, or from enacting systems of public campaign financing, including those designed to restrict the influence of private wealth by offsetting campaign spending or independent expenditures with increased public funding.’’.

 

Removal of Ethanol Subsidies and the mandate of inclusion in gasoline

ChatGpt

Quote

"The Ethanol Subsidy and Mandate Repeal Act"

Section 1. Short Title This Act may be cited as the "Ethanol Subsidy and Mandate Repeal Act."

Section 2. Elimination of Ethanol Subsidies and Mandates (a) Repeal of Subsidies - The following provisions of law are repealed: (1) Section 40 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (relating to special allowance for alcohol used as fuel). (2) Section 6426 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (relating to credit for alcohol used as fuel). (b) Repeal of Mandates - The Clean Air Act is amended by striking section 211(o) (relating to the national biofuels program) and section 211(q) (relating to the Renewable Fuel Standard).

(c) Effective Date - The repeal made by this Act shall apply to fuel sold on or after the date that is 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act.

Section 3. Government Savings The repeal of subsidies and mandates under this act is estimated to save the government $7 billion annually.

Section 4. Study on the Impact of Ethanol Subsidy and Mandate Repeal The Secretary of Energy shall conduct a study on the impact of the repeal of subsidies and mandates under this act on the ethanol industry, the environment and the gasoline market. The study shall be submitted to Congress within one year after the date of the repeal of subsidies and mandates under this act.

Section 5. Severability If any provision of this Act, or the application thereof to any person or circumstance, is held invalid, the remainder of this Act and the application of such provision to other persons or circumstances shall not be affected thereby.

Section 6. This Act shall take effect upon passage.

As with the previous bill, this bill is an example of how the bill could be structured. The terms used in the bill, such as the specific laws being repealed, the effective date and the savings to the government, would need to be determined and written by the actual legislators.

 

Edited by pacman
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • pacman changed the title to ChatGpt writes American Policy
Quote

 

It is possible to write a constitutional amendment that would demilitarize the police, here is an example:

"Section 1: The federal government, as well as state and local governments, shall not provide military equipment or training to civilian law enforcement agencies except in cases of emergency or natural disaster.

Section 2: Civilian law enforcement agencies shall not possess or use military equipment or tactics, except in cases of emergency or natural disaster.

Section 3: This amendment shall not be construed to prevent law enforcement agencies from obtaining and using equipment and tactics that are commonly used by civilian law enforcement agencies and are necessary for their daily operations."

This amendment aims to limit the militarization of police forces, by preventing the provision of military equipment and training to civilian law enforcement agencies, and limiting the possession and use of such equipment and tactics. However, it allows for exceptions in emergency or natural disaster situations, where the use of military equipment and tactics may be necessary for the protection of public safety.

Please note that this is a fictional amendment, and it will require a lot of political will, public support, and a lot of planning to be passed and ratified by the states.

 

Hmm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Played around on ChatGPT for the first time last night. In some fields its amazing. In others it still is a work in progress. Anything that required opinion or critical thinking, it's not very good at. But anything that's more factual, it's great.

For example, I did some prompt about "Why is Emmitt Smith the greatest running back ever?" -- it came back with very generic stuff that sounds like a non-native English speaker in an Asian country read Wikipedia and wrote it. 

Then I asked it the total return of the S&P 500 from some random date to random date and it instantly returned the answer. The haikus about the 2005 Texas Longhorns were also good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, FirstTimeCaller said:

Played around on ChatGPT for the first time last night. In some fields its amazing. In others it still is a work in progress. Anything that required opinion or critical thinking, it's not very good at. But anything that's more factual, it's great.

For example, I did some prompt about "Why is Emmitt Smith the greatest running back ever?" -- it came back with very generic stuff that sounds like a non-native English speaker in an Asian country read Wikipedia and wrote it. 

Then I asked it the total return of the S&P 500 from some random date to random date and it instantly returned the answer. The haikus about the 2005 Texas Longhorns were also good.

 

Football natty time

Sports wags: Trojans best ever

Longhorns said fuck you

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's really fun to have it tell stories in a certain style.  Really good at that.  We have a ton of fun with it with the kids.  Also, ChatGPT is a C- rap lyricist as well, which is better than I thought it would have been.  But it won't get mean and is incapable of being funny, which is too bad.....

Staying on topic: "Write a rap song about the best way to overturn the Citizen's United Decision:"

Verse 1: The Citizens United decision, it's got to go, It's time to take back control, Money in politics, it's not the way, We need to make our voices heard today

Chorus: We need to organize, we need to mobilize, We need to make our voices heard, we need to realize, That the Citizens United decision, it's got to fall, We need to rise up, and give democracy a call

Verse 2: We need to get educated, on the issue at hand, We need to understand, How money in politics, it's hurting us all, We need to rise up and make the call

Chorus: We need to organize, we need to mobilize, We need to make our voices heard, we need to realize, That the Citizens United decision, it's got to fall, We need to rise up, and give democracy a call

Verse 3: We need to vote, we need to speak, We need to let our representatives know, that this is not unique, We need to support candidates, that stand for reform, We need to end this, before it causes more harm

Chorus: We need to organize, we need to mobilize, We need to make our voices heard, we need to realize, That the Citizens United decision, it's got to fall, We need to rise up, and give democracy a call

Outro: So let's take action, let's make a change, Let's end the Citizens United decision, let's rearrange, Our democracy, it's worth fighting for, We need to rise up, and open the door.

 
 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, FirstTimeCaller said:

Played around on ChatGPT for the first time last night. In some fields its amazing. In others it still is a work in progress. Anything that required opinion or critical thinking, it's not very good at. But anything that's more factual, it's great.

For example, I did some prompt about "Why is Emmitt Smith the greatest running back ever?" -- it came back with very generic stuff that sounds like a non-native English speaker in an Asian country read Wikipedia and wrote it. 

Then I asked it the total return of the S&P 500 from some random date to random date and it instantly returned the answer. The haikus about the 2005 Texas Longhorns were also good.

What you're seeing is the difference between natural language processing and data recall - what chatGPT does - and actual understanding and insight to synthesize new ideas. In cases where the request can be simply broken down into reciting a set of facts in a specific schema - write a haiku about the 2005 longhorns - it's pretty well suited to answer that brief, because the creativity is the idea not the actual execution.

If there was a dataset or study that was indexed into chatGPT that proved Emmitt Smith to be the greatest running back ever, then you'd probably get that served back up to you with some nice fluff to make it more readable and interesting.

I've found it to be really useful to get a rough first draft of an invitation or event write-up for an engagement with a customer. I usually end up grabbing some phrases and nice use of language from the response, and then rewrite it into my usual voice.

 

I do quite a bit of NLP, intelligent document processing, and loads of other AI/ML stuff so I'm very interested to see how these tools change how we do work

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Captainant said:

What you're seeing is the difference between natural language processing and data recall - what chatGPT does - and actual understanding and insight to synthesize new ideas. In cases where the request can be simply broken down into reciting a set of facts in a specific schema - write a haiku about the 2005 longhorns - it's pretty well suited to answer that brief, because the creativity is the idea not the actual execution.

If there was a dataset or study that was indexed into chatGPT that proved Emmitt Smith to be the greatest running back ever, then you'd probably get that served back up to you with some nice fluff to make it more readable and interesting.

I've found it to be really useful to get a rough first draft of an invitation or event write-up for an engagement with a customer. I usually end up grabbing some phrases and nice use of language from the response, and then rewrite it into my usual voice.

 

I do quite a bit of NLP, intelligent document processing, and loads of other AI/ML stuff so I'm very interested to see how these tools change how we do work

I'd be curious to hear your experience and point of view on IDP (as it seems to be the most unlike what chatpGPT does as an ingestion tool to extract data from unstructured data sources) because I've been following it for a while and the entire market seems to be crazy crowded and I can't really make heads or tails of who the best-of-breed engines are (AWS textract? Google Tesseract? VC-funded private start-ups that are 2 years old? Legacy software like Abbyy or Kofax?) and it just feels like a chaotic landscape where even analysts can't figure it out. Maybe another thread.

Edited by HamsterHookah
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I havent dicked around with it yet.  But it occurs to me that it might be an excellent way to dictate things.  When I first started lawdogging, dictation was fairly ubiquitous among older lawyers.  It tends to force you to keep sentences simple, but punctuation and some gap-filling was done by a secretary and a good secretary learned how you dictated and it became a fairly efficient system.

It was especially good for patent applications, which tend to kind of write themselves because of the nature of the document and the process.  It sounds like ChatGPT might do a pretty good job of duplicating the lawyer/secretary combo.  Of course, you'd need audio input.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, TwiceHorn said:

It was especially good for patent applications, which tend to kind of write themselves because of the nature of the document and the process.  It sounds like ChatGPT might do a pretty good job of duplicating the lawyer/secretary combo.  Of course, you'd need audio input.

There's quite a bit of procedural legal work, both in the court and in the law firm, that can be done with an ML model. Trick is, you still need a person there as a check to make sure it's not making a terrible strategic choice or missing some factor - which will ABSOLUTELY happen. 

Microsoft just bought openAI, the creators of chatGPT, so it wouldn't be all that surprising to see more business oriented ML functionality in office apps and powerBI and shit in like 10 years. 

Honestly though, lots of legal work is just digging through documents for a term or reference to an entity. That's a core use case of intelligence document processing (IDP), which is decidedly less exciting than GPT models lol, but really powerful in quantitatively analyzing a corpus of documents, or even court/call/whatever transcripts 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...