Jump to content
LTtxfan

2020 CFB Catch All Thread

Recommended Posts

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/28636331/college-football-most-intriguing-2020-games-headlined-nick-saban-vs-lane-kiffin

College football's most intriguing 2020 games headlined by Nick Saban vs. Lane Kiffin

Feb 11, 2020

Alex Scarborough  ESPN Staff Writer

It's only February, but who's kidding whom here? It has been a month since the CFP National Championship and we're already looking ahead to the start of the 2020 season, circling the most compelling games on the calendar.  The criteria here is more games of interest than of importance. That's why you won't see the annual Texas-Oklahoma, Michigan-Ohio State and Auburn-Alabama rivalries. We've all come to expect those games to matter, so we're looking for a different mix of matchups that will draw people in for other reasons.

  • Michigan at Washington, Sept. 5

Set aside the abrupt retirement of Chris Petersen and the ascension of Jimmy Lake to head coach at Washington. With all due respect, this game really isn't about that -- or those picturesque views of Husky Stadium, which looks out over the bay in Seattle, either. Rather, the focus will be squarely on Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh, who finds himself squarely on the hot seat and can't afford starting the season off with a loss.

  • North Dakota State at Oregon, Sept. 5

A 12-win season and a Rose Bowl win was great and all, but now what? With quarterback Justin Herbert gone, whom will Oregon turn to behind center? Coach Mario Cristobal has a lot of questions to answer, and not much time to do it. North Dakota State is no ordinary cupcake FCS season-opening opponent. The Bison are a powerhouse, having won three consecutive FCS National Championships and riding a 37-game winning streak.

  • Texas at LSU, Sept. 12

Welcome to the A/C Bowl, Part II. The first installment last year in Austin was a wild ride, and not just the pregame DBU debate and the game itself when LSU quarterback Joe Burrow began his Heisman Trophy campaign with a bang. The real fireworks came afterward when LSU coach Ed Orgeron claimed that the air conditioning in the visitors locker room wasn't working, which Texas denied. When asked about returning the favor, Oregon laughed and said, "I'm sure we have a plan or two to make them as comfortable as they can possibly be."

  • Auburn vs. UNC, Sept. 12

The ACC is in desperate need of a team other than Clemson to step up. Could it be UNC in Year 2 of the Mack Brown era? Beating Auburn in Atlanta would be a start. UNC returns its stellar freshman quarterback Sam Howell, while Auburn's defense will be without standout defensive linemen Derrick Brown and Marlon Davidson.

  • Georgia at Alabama, Sept. 19

Nick Saban is bound to lose to one of his former assistant coaches someday, right? I mean, we're at 19 wins and counting, and the streak is bordering on ridiculous. So maybe with Georgia coach Kirby Smart coming back to Tuscaloosa for the first time since he left his post as defensive coordinator, it's time for it to end. Alabama will be breaking in an inexperienced starting quarterback, and Georgia's defense is loaded. The loss of longtime starting quarterback Jake Fromm hurts, of course, but replacing him with Wake Forest transfer Jamie Newman and bringing in Todd Monken to overhaul the offense means the Bulldogs are dangerous.

  • Florida State at Boise State, Sept. 19

Last year's second-half meltdown against Boise State was the beginning of the end of Willie Taggart's short-lived run as head coach at Florida State. But that doesn't mean the pain is coming to an end for Seminoles fans just because Taggart is gone. Going on the road to the blue turf of Boise, where the Broncos are primed for a huge season, will be a tough task for a team looking to regain respectability under new coach Mike Norvell.

  • Oklahoma at Army, Sept. 26

How often do we see legacy programs like Oklahoma go on the road to play a service academy? Most schools avoid Army and its triple-option offense at all costs. But the Sooners are making the risky, albeit scenic, trip to West Point, New York, early in the season and with a young quarterback (Spencer Rattler) in tow.

  • Alabama at Ole Miss, Oct. 3

Something tells me the reunion of Nick Saban and Lane Kiffin won't feature a lot of hugs at midfield. Kiffin certainly cherished his time as offensive coordinator at Alabama from 2014 to 2016, when Saban essentially threw him a lifeline and helped turn around his career, but now that he's back in the SEC at Ole Miss, don't be surprised if he takes aim at his old boss. The talent disparity is obvious but Kiffin is nothing if not creative and he'll have one of the most electric quarterbacks in the conference (John Rhys Plumlee) to work with.

  • Texas A&M at Auburn, Oct. 17

It feels like every story about Jimbo Fisher begins or ends with a note about the eye-popping $75 million guaranteed contract Texas A&M gave him back in December 2017. And now it's time, in his third year leading the program and with veteran quarterback Kellen Mond back for his senior season, for the Aggies to get their return on investment. They should be undefeated heading into the trip to Auburn, after all, coming off games against Abilene Christian, North Texas, Colorado, Arkansas, Mississippi State and Fresno State. Beating the Tigers would signal a step forward. Losing would raise serious questions and start the hot-seat talk right away.

  • Alabama at LSU, Nov. 7

Man oh man did LSU enjoy beating Alabama in Tuscaloosa last year, celebrating on the field as if it had won a national championship. Joe Burrow was carried away on his teammates' shoulders, for goodness sake. And that very public celebration would have been enough to light a fire under Alabama for the rematch of bitter SEC rivals. Strength coach Scott Cochran has been known to make a motivational mountain out of a molehill, after all. But then a clip of Ed Orgeron shouting, "Roll Tide, what? F--- you!" in the locker room was leaked and it sparked what will surely be one of the most intense games in the rivalry when Alabama goes into Death Valley.

  • Clemson at Notre Dame, Nov. 7

Cover your ears, Dabo Swinney. This isn't meant to be disrespectful to you or your conference. We all know how you feel about that. But look at your schedule and find the playoff-caliber test. Whether it's a weak ACC (not your fault, of course) or an out-of-conference schedule that includes Akron, The Citadel and South Carolina (kind of your fault), there's just not a lot there. So it will all come down to one game: a trip to South Bend against a Notre Dame team that has high expectations and a senior quarterback in Ian Book. Win and you're in. Lose and the dream of taking back the national championship might be over in November.

  • Mississippi State at Ole Miss, Nov. 26

Who can forget the end of last year's Egg Bowl, when a pretend dog urination gesture led to a missed extra point and an Ole Miss loss? In an already storied and colorful rivalry, that was one for the ages. But then the dominoes started to fall. Ole Miss fired coach Matt Luke and replaced him with the brash and enigmatic Lane Kiffin. Not to be outdone, Mississippi State then fired Joe Moorhead a month later and stole back the spotlight by replacing him with the always eccentric Mike Leach. It's fitting then that their first meeting will have center stage as the lone FBS game on Thanksgiving night.

Others to watch

Ohio State at Oregon, Sept. 12: The beginning of a great home-and-home series serves as a rematch of the inaugural CFP National Championship Game in 2015.

Tennessee at Oklahoma, Sept. 12: Two storied programs will meet, but the first big test for Sooners quarterback Spencer Rattler will be the biggest draw.

Penn State at Virginia Tech, Sept. 12: Can Penn State take the next step as a program? It starts here.

Washington at Washington State, Nov. 27: The Apple Cup will have new coaches on both sides with Jimmy Lake taking over the Huskies' program and Nick Rolovich leading the Cougs.

Nevada at UNLV, Nov. 28: A fight broke out after the game-winning touchdown in overtime last year. Don't be surprised if emotions are running high in the rematch.

 

 

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Hot seat talk" if Auburn is Dumbo's first loss? I mean, I fully expect aggy to have already lost one, maybe two, of their supposed "gimme" games before then, but losing to Auburn has never embarrassed aggy before, so why start now?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Walden Ponderer said:

"Hot seat talk" if Auburn is Dumbo's first loss? I mean, I fully expect aggy to have already lost one, maybe two, of their supposed "gimme" games before then, but losing to Auburn has never embarrassed aggy before, so why start now?

 

Hot Seat for Dumbo may start with their first loss on April 18th...  😂😂😂

2020 Texas A&M Football Schedule

DATE/OPPONENT / LOCATION    

  • Sat, Apr 18   Texas A&M  College Station, TX | Spring Game
  • Sat, Sep 5.   Abilene Christian   College Station. TX
  • Sat, Sep 12   North Texas  College Station. TX
  • Sat, Sep 19    Colorado    College Station. TX
  • Sat, Sep 26    Arkansas *  Arlington, TX
  • Sat, Oct 3    @ Mississippi State  Starkville, MS
  • Sat, Oct 10   Fresno State  College Station. TX
  • Sat, Oct 17    @ Auburn   Auburn, AL
  • Sat, Oct 24    @ South Carolina  Columbia, SC
  • Sat, Nov 7     Ole Miss   College Station. TX
  • Sat, Nov 14    Vanderbilt  College Station. TX
  • Sat, Nov 21   @ Alabama  Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Sat, Nov 28     LSU    College Station. TX

 

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A&M will have at least two losses when it goes to Auburn; spring game & Leach in Starkville. If Jimbo has fully embraced what it means to be an aggie, he likely will have lost to Arkansas as well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Long Detailed article in case you are interested... 2nd Edition.  (For reference, here is the first version.)

Way-Too-Early College Football Top 25: LSU loses ground, Clemson still No. 1  

Mark Schlabach.  ESPN Senior Writer 6:06 AM CT 

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/28726502/way-too-early-college-football-top-25-lsu-loses-ground-clemson-no-1 

1. Clemson

2. Ohio State

3. Alabama

4. Georgia

5. Penn State

6. Oregon

7. Florida

8. LSU

9. Oklahoma

10. Notre Dame

11. Texas A&M    😂😂😂

12. Oklahoma State

13. Wisconsin

14. Auburn

15. Michigan

16. Minnesota

17. Cincinnati 

18. Iowa State

19. Boise State

20. Iowa

21. USC

22. North Carolina

23. Texas

24. Appalachian State

25. Baylor     😆😆😆

 

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.espn.com/college-sports/story/_/id/28724972/acc-student-athletes-allowed-one-transfer-exemption

ACC: Student-athletes should be allowed one-time transfer exemption

Feb 17, 2020    Adam Rittenberg.   ESPN  

The ACC is joining the Big Ten in supporting a one-time transfer exemption for student-athletes in all sports.  The league announced Monday that it "unanimously concluded" at its annual winter meetings that athletes in all sports should be allowed to transfer one time without having to sit out a year of competition. NCAA rules currently allow a one-time transfer exemption for athletes in all but five sports: football, men's basketball, women's basketball, baseball and men's ice hockey. Athletes transferring in those sports must sit out a year of competition unless they graduate from their original institution or obtain an immediate-eligibility waiver from the NCAA.

Big Ten athletic directors confirmed last month that the league in 2019 introduced a proposal for a one-time transfer exemption in all sports. The proposal is not being considered because the NCAA board of directors in November imposed a moratorium on all transfer related proposals. Ohio State athletics director Gene Smith told ESPN that he hoped the Big Ten's proposal would "force a discussion" among other leagues about changing the transfer rules.

"The ACC discussed the transfer environment and unanimously concluded that as a matter of principle we support a one-time transfer opportunity for all student-athletes, regardless of sport," the ACC said in a statement Monday. "As a conference, we look forward to continuing the discussion nationally."

A Big Ten athletic director said the league hopes the moratorium soon will be lifted, and the proposal could be considered as early as this spring, with a potential vote at the 2021 NCAA convention.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/28708116/2020-preseason-college-football-fpi-breakdown

2020 CFB Preseason FPI Rankings

RANKING
TEAM CONFERENCE
1. Clemson ACC
2. Ohio State Big Ten
3. Oklahoma Big 12
4. Alabama SEC
5. Penn State Big Ten
6. Wisconsin Big Ten
7. Texas Big 12
8. Texas A&M SEC
9. Notre Dame Independent
10. Georgia SEC
11. Florida SEC
12. LSU SEC
13. USC Pac-12
14. Oregon Pac-12
15. Auburn SEC
16. Michigan Big Ten
17. Oklahoma State Big 12
18. North Carolina ACC
19. Tennessee SEC
20. Minnesota Big Ten
21. UCF American Athletic
22. Nebraska Big Ten
23. Florida State ACC
24. Utah Pac-12
25. Virginia Tech ACC
26. Indiana Big Ten
27. Iowa Big Ten
28. Stanford Pac-12
29. Washington Pac-12
30. California Pac-12
31. Iowa State Big 12
32. TCU Big 12
33. Kentucky SEC
34. South Carolina SEC
35. Louisville ACC
36. Purdue Big Ten
37. Miami (FL) ACC
38. Northwestern Big Ten
39. Mississippi State SEC
40. Cincinnati American Athletic
41. Arizona State Pac-12
42. Ole Miss SEC
43. Pittsburgh ACC
44. Baylor Big 12
45. Houston American Athletic
46. Texas Tech Big 12
47. Virginia ACC
48. West Virginia Big 12
49. UCLA Pac-12
50. Kansas State Big 12
51. Boise State Mountain West
52. Navy American Athletic
53. Missouri SEC
54. Washington State Pac-12
55. Georgia Tech ACC
56. Colorado Pac-12
57. Memphis American Athletic
58. Michigan State Big Ten
59. North Carolina State ACC
60. SMU American Athletic
61. Louisiana-Lafayette Sun Belt
62. BYU Independent
63. Arizona Pac-12
64. Duke ACC
65. Illinois Big Ten
66. Arkansas SEC
67. Oregon State Pac-12
68. Maryland Big Ten
69. Wake Forest ACC
70. Tulsa American Athletic
71. Buffalo MAC
72. Syracuse ACC
73. Western Kentucky Conference USA
74. Tulane American Athletic
75. Appalachian State Sun Belt
76. Air Force Mountain West
77. Wyoming Mountain West
78. Boston College ACC
79. Southern Miss Conference USA
80. Marshall Conference USA
81. Vanderbilt SEC
82. Western Michigan MAC
83. Rutgers Big Ten
84. Miami (OH) MAC
85. UAB Conference USA
86. South Florida American Athletic
87. Arkansas State Sun Belt
88. San Diego State Mountain West
89. Florida Atlantic Conference USA
90. Ohio MAC
91. Temple American Athletic
92. Middle Tennessee Conference USA
93. Fresno State Mountain West
94. Ball State MAC
95. Utah State Mountain West
96. Colorado State Mountain West
97. East Carolina American Athletic
98. Nevada Mountain West
99. Georgia Southern Sun Belt
100. Army Independent
101. Toledo MAC
102. Northern Illinois MAC
103. Central Michigan MAC
104. Kansas Big 12
105. Louisiana Tech Conference USA
106. Kent State MAC
107. Georgia State Sun Belt
108. San Jose State Mountain West
109. Rice Conference USA
110. Troy Sun Belt
111. Charlotte Conference USA
112. Coastal Carolina Sun Belt
113. Louisiana-Monroe Sun Belt
114. South Alabama Sun Belt
115. North Texas Conference USA
116. UTSA Conference USA
117. UNLV Mountain West
118. Old Dominion Conference USA
119. Hawaii Mountain West
120. Florida International Conference USA
121. Eastern Michigan MAC
122. Liberty Independents
123. Connecticut Independents
124. New Mexico Mountain West
125. Texas State Sun Belt
126. New Mexico State FBS Independents
127. Bowling Green MAC
128. Akron MAC
129. UTEP Conference USA
130. UMass Independent

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SEC: An hour before hitting the field for spring practice, Alabama has announced that they are suspending practice until further notice. Source tells FootballScoop the entire SEC is doing this. Update: The SEC has now announced it is suspending “all organized team activities, including competitions, team and individual practices, meetings and other organized gatherings” through April 15.

Georgia: Kirby Smart and staff members required to self-quarantine, per report.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

https://www.si.com/college/2020/03/20/college-football-spring-coronavirus-impact-unc

How One College Football Team Is Staying in Shape While Staying Home 

The coronavirus outbreak has created logistical challenges for college football teams who would normally be holding spring practice.

LAKEN LITMAN   MAR 20, 2020

Backpacks stuffed with books. Duffle bags filled with sand. Water jugs. This is what at-home workout equipment looks like during a pandemic. With gyms, among so many other things, shut down around the globe as the coronavirus continues to spread, people are turning their living rooms, kitchens and even bathrooms into pseudo fitness studios.

This includes Division I athletes, who must figure out another way to keep up their strength and conditioning with many college campuses closed. The NCAA recently canceled all winter and spring championships for 2020 and some conferences have canceled all athletic related activities through the end of the 2019-20 academic year. So how do student-athletes stay in shape without access to their school’s multimillion-dollar facilities and state-of-the-art technology and equipment?

“Instead of a dumbbell squat, we’re giving them direction on how to fill a duffle bag with sand or books or anything that they have to give it some weight,” says North Carolina’s head strength coach Brian Hess. “So now we’ll do a goblet squat. It’s the same movement, but now we’re loading it with anything we can put together at home.”

At UNC, Hess and his strength staff are putting together voluntary workout programs for football players to do at home. A gallon of water can become a kettle bell. A coffee table can become a bench. When Hess worked as an assistant strength coach at Harvard from 2009-11, he had to come up with exercises for a Nordic skier who was studying abroad in Patagonia. With the coronavirus outbreak halting team workouts until further notice, he’s falling back on that experience. “This isn’t the first time I’ve had to write a program with no weights involved,” he says.

Hess’s plan is to email players PDFs with personalized workouts, including diagrams and explanations of each movement, each week. Ideally the guys will establish a routine and train at similar times as if they were working together in Chapel Hill. Hess expects this will be easier to manage once players receive their academic schedules and begin online classes next week.

The team will be split into four groups of 25 players—mostly organized by position—reporting to a specific strength coach. Hess, for example, will be in charge of the linemen. Coaches hope this will keep communication smooth, whether it's via email, Zoom or text.

While he’s still in the process of finalizing the program, Hess explained what the first week might look like: Players begin with the same dynamic warmup they’ve done before as a team, then move into a duffle bag goblet rear foot elevated squat, maybe four sets of eight reps each side, then into a bag goblet reverse lunge. Hess notes that single leg work will be a big focus because he’s got to keep movements challenging despite the lack of load. The rest of the workout might include a bag RDL, bag hip bridge and core movements. As far as cardio and conditioning, Hess hopes players can get to a field or a flat road and set up some cones—or something similar—for change-of-direction work.

After three weeks, Hess and his staff will re-evaluate how things are going and make necessary adjustments.

“We will give them as many options as we can to replicate the best training program we can,” Hess says.

Eventually, depending how long it takes to get back on campus, Hess will add position-specific concepts the best he can. It might just be that conditioning will be different for each group, or that some of the explosive work and plyometrics would change slightly if you’re a skill player or a lineman.

“Once we get to the time of year where that becomes our focus, we’ll have a new program ready for the guys from an at-home standpoint,” Hess says.

North Carolina went 7–6 under Mack Brown last season but has the tools to be an ACC Coastal contender. The Tar Heels had the nation’s No. 19 recruiting class for 2020 and currently have the No. 4 class for 2021. Four-star quarterback Drake Maye, a top-10 quarterback in his class, recently flipped his commitment from Alabama to UNC. But in order to legitimately compete with Clemson within the conference and keep up the program’s momentum, players can’t get lax while they’re stuck at home.

“If you’re a lazy player or your eating habits are bad, we’ve challenged parents to help us, but we’ve also challenged players,” Brown says. “Teams that have a lack of discipline or are irresponsible are going to lose ground and lose games this spring, not next fall.”

Hess adds that while he’s not worried the team will get out of shape, he reminds them that “if we have to start at zero when you come back, that will put us further behind. But if we can start back with some conditioning and then hit our summer program as planned, with some modifications made, we’ll be in a much better spot.”

Players still have access to team nutritionist Kelsee Gomes, too, who will regularly communicate with players about how their diet is going. UNC is also working with the NCAA to figure out how to continue helping players who might be mid-rehab and providing guys with certain nutritional items, like supplements, that they’d normally have access to on campus.

“We’re just making sure guys don’t regress after working so hard,” Hess says.

Hess admits he will be interested to see where his players end up when this is all over and life is back to normal. No one has any idea when college football teams will get back to campus. Or when fall camp will start. Or if the season will be impacted. Right now, all the UNC strength staff can do is keep players moving and help them stay in the best shape possible, understanding that a bag goblet squat simply isn’t the same thing as a dynamic effort squat where bar speed is measured by chains and bands. But it will have to do for now.

“It’s making the best out of a bad situation,” Hess says.

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/19/2020 at 3:13 PM, Walden Ponderer said:

I call bullshit. Kansas at 104? You're telling me there's 26 FBS teams they could beat?

 

spacer.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
https://www.si.com/college/2020/03/20/college-football-spring-coronavirus-impact-unc
How One College Football Team Is Staying in Shape While Staying Home 
The coronavirus outbreak has created logistical challenges for college football teams who would normally be holding spring practice.
LAKEN LITMAN   MAR 20, 2020
Backpacks stuffed with books. Duffle bags filled with sand. Water jugs. This is what at-home workout equipment looks like during a pandemic. With gyms, among so many other things, shut down around the globe as the coronavirus continues to spread, people are turning their living rooms, kitchens and even bathrooms into pseudo fitness studios.
This includes Division I athletes, who must figure out another way to keep up their strength and conditioning with many college campuses closed. The NCAA recently canceled all winter and spring championships for 2020 and some conferences have canceled all athletic related activities through the end of the 2019-20 academic year. So how do student-athletes stay in shape without access to their school’s multimillion-dollar facilities and state-of-the-art technology and equipment?
“Instead of a dumbbell squat, we’re giving them direction on how to fill a duffle bag with sand or books or anything that they have to give it some weight,” says North Carolina’s head strength coach Brian Hess. “So now we’ll do a goblet squat. It’s the same movement, but now we’re loading it with anything we can put together at home.”
At UNC, Hess and his strength staff are putting together voluntary workout programs for football players to do at home. A gallon of water can become a kettle bell. A coffee table can become a bench. When Hess worked as an assistant strength coach at Harvard from 2009-11, he had to come up with exercises for a Nordic skier who was studying abroad in Patagonia. With the coronavirus outbreak halting team workouts until further notice, he’s falling back on that experience. “This isn’t the first time I’ve had to write a program with no weights involved,” he says.
Hess’s plan is to email players PDFs with personalized workouts, including diagrams and explanations of each movement, each week. Ideally the guys will establish a routine and train at similar times as if they were working together in Chapel Hill. Hess expects this will be easier to manage once players receive their academic schedules and begin online classes next week.
The team will be split into four groups of 25 players—mostly organized by position—reporting to a specific strength coach. Hess, for example, will be in charge of the linemen. Coaches hope this will keep communication smooth, whether it's via email, Zoom or text.
While he’s still in the process of finalizing the program, Hess explained what the first week might look like: Players begin with the same dynamic warmup they’ve done before as a team, then move into a duffle bag goblet rear foot elevated squat, maybe four sets of eight reps each side, then into a bag goblet reverse lunge. Hess notes that single leg work will be a big focus because he’s got to keep movements challenging despite the lack of load. The rest of the workout might include a bag RDL, bag hip bridge and core movements. As far as cardio and conditioning, Hess hopes players can get to a field or a flat road and set up some cones—or something similar—for change-of-direction work.
After three weeks, Hess and his staff will re-evaluate how things are going and make necessary adjustments.
“We will give them as many options as we can to replicate the best training program we can,” Hess says.
Eventually, depending how long it takes to get back on campus, Hess will add position-specific concepts the best he can. It might just be that conditioning will be different for each group, or that some of the explosive work and plyometrics would change slightly if you’re a skill player or a lineman.
“Once we get to the time of year where that becomes our focus, we’ll have a new program ready for the guys from an at-home standpoint,” Hess says.
North Carolina went 7–6 under Mack Brown last season but has the tools to be an ACC Coastal contender. The Tar Heels had the nation’s No. 19 recruiting class for 2020 and currently have the No. 4 class for 2021. Four-star quarterback Drake Maye, a top-10 quarterback in his class, recently flipped his commitment from Alabama to UNC. But in order to legitimately compete with Clemson within the conference and keep up the program’s momentum, players can’t get lax while they’re stuck at home.
“If you’re a lazy player or your eating habits are bad, we’ve challenged parents to help us, but we’ve also challenged players,” Brown says. “Teams that have a lack of discipline or are irresponsible are going to lose ground and lose games this spring, not next fall.”
Hess adds that while he’s not worried the team will get out of shape, he reminds them that “if we have to start at zero when you come back, that will put us further behind. But if we can start back with some conditioning and then hit our summer program as planned, with some modifications made, we’ll be in a much better spot.”
Players still have access to team nutritionist Kelsee Gomes, too, who will regularly communicate with players about how their diet is going. UNC is also working with the NCAA to figure out how to continue helping players who might be mid-rehab and providing guys with certain nutritional items, like supplements, that they’d normally have access to on campus.
“We’re just making sure guys don’t regress after working so hard,” Hess says.
Hess admits he will be interested to see where his players end up when this is all over and life is back to normal. No one has any idea when college football teams will get back to campus. Or when fall camp will start. Or if the season will be impacted. Right now, all the UNC strength staff can do is keep players moving and help them stay in the best shape possible, understanding that a bag goblet squat simply isn’t the same thing as a dynamic effort squat where bar speed is measured by chains and bands. But it will have to do for now.
“It’s making the best out of a bad situation,” Hess says.
That's an interesting article. A lot will be said about programs this Fall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, JFKFC said:

Folks..... this season will be canceled. 

 

I could see a scenario where it might be delayed, but not canceled...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...