Jump to content
Chilly Water

2018 Lawn and Landscape Thread

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)
On 6/15/2020 at 10:10 PM, dad said:

Figured out why one section of my lawn felt hard and clay like and never grew nice grass. Found a huge section of chunks of concrete that the builders must have poured out. Excited that by next spring I’ll start growing new grass that stands a chance. 60d01f76b288d513a76939098e72a2a2.jpg

a6719ef7f4ffcd38050a7c7067e6695b.jpg

I've found poured out concrete, large segments of oak trees they cut down, and plywood under dry spots in my lawn.  

Couple of things I'd recommend - a soil probe (basically a big ass spike with a T handle) and a flat bladed landscaping shovel.  I can cut and pull my lawn up, dig out the offending trash left 2" under my sod and then fill in and re-install the same piece of sod almost without noticing it was ever cut up.  

Also - I've been using Penterra to get water down through the dry spots and into the root zone with great success.  You can buy it on Amazon.  Any localized dry spot, or compacted clay on swages or hills - this shit works wonders. https://drylawn.com/water-penetration.html

Its nothing really special compared to most surfactant/wetting agents - its just a helluva lot stronger.  Three treatments on low spots that collect standing water after heavy rain or irrigation and they are gone.  The water absorbs into the soil like its a dry sponge.  It's good shit.

Edited by krevo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Vito Andolini said:

I hope this is the correct forum...

Your boy Ol’ Vito moronically took on the challenge recently of putting in an extra patio and cut a sprinkler PVC line. I actually have two stacked right on top of each other, a 3/4 inch line on top escaped any damage, but it’s the 1” line directly below it that was cut.

(When I say “stacked,” I mean they are almost touching, and this will be an issue later in the post.)

I removed the section of damaged pipe, about 10”, and thought I could put two couplings on either end and a section of new pipe in between, but I’m doubtful there’s enough play in the pipe on either side to insert the new section. Perhaps it could be done with a lot more digging. I did see a video where a guy accomplishes this by removing the stop inside one of the couplings, but I may not even have room to do that due to the proximity of Pipe #2.

So I bought a telescoping coupling that would ordinarily work, but jeez it has an enormous body, and I really doubt it will have space to fit, since agan, the asshole landscaping company put the 3/4” line right on top of the 1”.

I know the damaged 1” is a pressurized water line... is the 3/4” the same, or is there a chance it’s just a drain line? I’m asking because I may solve my issue by cutting out a section of the 3/4” line and putting in a flexible line to give me room for the telescoping coupling on the 1” below, but the specs say those flexible lines can’t be used for constant pressure, so I don’t want to create a new issue.

Happy to hear any advice, thanks in advance.

You got a pic?  I have had this problem before with a smaller pipe, you can put 90 degree elbows on the 2 ends of the cut pipe, aiming them up as much as you can, then drop in your new pipe (also with elbows on the end) running along side sort of like a splint.  Any more digging would be parallel to the big pipe.  You could also do the same thing with the 3/4 line giving you more room to play with the bigger one.

Edited by Dr Fear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Dr Fear said:

You got a pic?  I have had this problem before with a smaller pipe, you can put 90 degree elbows on the 2 ends of the cut pipe, aiming them up as much as you can, then drop in your new pipe (also with elbows on the end) running along side sort of like a splint.  Any more digging would be parallel to the big pipe.  You could also do the same thing with the 3/4 line giving you more room to play with the bigger one.

Yeah, that was my initial thought, then I realized (as you explained) that involves two elbows on each end, but I’m not sure I was thinking parallel, which is way smarter and keeps the water level consistent. I’ll consider that, thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, LABEVO said:

Having sod laid down this week at house that I rent out. How often / when should it be water? Any other suggestions for the grass to survive?

putting down saint augustine based in Austin. 

Initially you can water it a couple of times a day. Eventually you can go to 2 days a week. It really varies though. If you have a soil that barely holds water you'll have to water more often. Give it a good watering and see how long it takes to get it saturated. Set the clock to that time. You can split the time up. Water, skip an hour and then hit it again. 

7 hours ago, Vito Andolini said:

I hope this is the correct forum...

Your boy Ol’ Vito moronically took on the challenge recently of putting in an extra patio and cut a sprinkler PVC line. I actually have two stacked right on top of each other, a 3/4 inch line on top escaped any damage, but it’s the 1” line directly below it that was cut.

(When I say “stacked,” I mean they are almost touching, and this will be an issue later in the post.)

I removed the section of damaged pipe, about 10”, and thought I could put two couplings on either end and a section of new pipe in between, but I’m doubtful there’s enough play in the pipe on either side to insert the new section. Perhaps it could be done with a lot more digging. I did see a video where a guy accomplishes this by removing the stop inside one of the couplings, but I may not even have room to do that due to the proximity of Pipe #2.

So I bought a telescoping coupling that would ordinarily work, but jeez it has an enormous body, and I really doubt it will have space to fit, since agan, the asshole landscaping company put the 3/4” line right on top of the 1”.

I know the damaged 1” is a pressurized water line... is the 3/4” the same, or is there a chance it’s just a drain line? I’m asking because I may solve my issue by cutting out a section of the 3/4” line and putting in a flexible line to give me room for the telescoping coupling on the 1” below, but the specs say those flexible lines can’t be used for constant pressure, so I don’t want to create a new issue.

Happy to hear any advice, thanks in advance.

3/4" is your lateral line and the 1" is most likely the main. I'm guessing that you discovered them...umm unexpectedly? It's pretty normal to see them stacked like that in the same space. If you can put the telescoping couplings far enough away from the still buried pipe you might have enough flex to squeeze them in.

Compression couplings are slightly smaller in diameter. Maybe. 

You're going to want to pull a head and blow out the dirt from the line after you get it repaired. Greater than zero chance there is a wad of gunk in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, cactusflinthead said:

3/4" is your lateral line and the 1" is most likely the main. I'm guessing that you discovered them...umm unexpectedly? It's pretty normal to see them stacked like that in the same space. If you can put the telescoping couplings far enough away from the still buried pipe you might have enough flex to squeeze them in.

I’m really grateful for the advice. I’m presuming a lateral line is not under constant pressure, right? I’m also presuming a flexible PVC isn’t your first choice, but is there a chance it will hold up as a lateral patch?  Sorry for no pics, but I think it could be a solution for my tight fit (that’s what she said). Again, thanks a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, the lateral line is only engaged when that valve is opened. It is worth a shot. Hook it all up and let it set. Give it a test before covering it. If it blows out, well then you're not having to dig it up again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of watering.  Got this for Father's Day:

 

717B-UbIgDL._AC_SY450_.jpg

 

Replaced my '97 vintage Rainbird.  From opening box to joining up with app, took half an hour for installation.  Took another 15 minutes or so to test all 10 zones, answer some questions, etc.  Ran last night.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Francisco 2.0 said:

Speaking of watering.  Got this for Father's Day:

 

717B-UbIgDL._AC_SY450_.jpg

 

Replaced my '97 vintage Rainbird.  From opening box to joining up with app, took half an hour for installation.  Took another 15 minutes or so to test all 10 zones, answer some questions, etc.  Ran last night.  

Ooooh.  Me likey.  What brand?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/21/2020 at 8:50 PM, drt said:

spacer.pngWtf is wrong with this section of St Augustine right around the tree in our front yard? Been this way since moving in a few months ago, watered and fertilized to no avail. I thought someone just scalped it when we moved in but now I’m not so sure. 

 

@cactusflinthead any ideas on this? It's almost a circle around the tree there, like they treated the root zone of the tree or something.  I didn't think it would be fungus because it hasn't spread to the rest of the yard and that section is slightly elevated so should drain better than surrounding turf.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, drt said:

@cactusflinthead any ideas on this? It's almost a circle around the tree there, like they treated the root zone of the tree or something.  I didn't think it would be fungus because it hasn't spread to the rest of the yard and that section is slightly elevated so should drain better than surrounding turf.

If you don't think it's brown patch, then maybe a combined effect of shade from the tree canopy and those shallow tree roots competing with the grass roots?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/21/2020 at 8:50 PM, drt said:

spacer.pngWtf is wrong with this section of St Augustine right around the tree in our front yard? Been this way since moving in a few months ago, watered and fertilized to no avail. I thought someone just scalped it when we moved in but now I’m not so sure. 

 

https://neilsperry.com/2019/05/st-augustine-diagnostics-2/

Try the TARR treatment?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I think I'll try some fungicide for TARR, that tree is tall and thin enough that there isn't much shade cover for afternoon sun.  Thanks for the opinions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, drt said:

@cactusflinthead any ideas on this? It's almost a circle around the tree there, like they treated the root zone of the tree or something.  I didn't think it would be fungus because it hasn't spread to the rest of the yard and that section is slightly elevated so should drain better than surrounding turf.

TARR can be patchy. I have one problem area that is nearly identical. The rest of her yard is fine.

2 hours ago, Dr Fear said:

Note: he says "stop the spread"

That's step one, it stops dying. Recovery will take a while. 

The fungicide Azoxystrobin (sold as the consumer product Scotts Disease-EX and commercial product Heritage) does an excellent job of stopping the spread of TARR.

I'll see if I can find some more links on TARR. There are a couple of different replies from previous threads on this mess. 

probably time for a refresher 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/22/2020 at 8:59 AM, krevo said:

I've found poured out concrete, large segments of oak trees they cut down, and plywood under dry spots in my lawn.  

Couple of things I'd recommend - a soil probe (basically a big ass spike with a T handle) and a flat bladed landscaping shovel.  I can cut and pull my lawn up, dig out the offending trash left 2" under my sod and then fill in and re-install the same piece of sod almost without noticing it was ever cut up.  

Also - I've been using Penterra to get water down through the dry spots and into the root zone with great success.  You can buy it on Amazon.  Any localized dry spot, or compacted clay on swages or hills - this shit works wonders. https://drylawn.com/water-penetration.html

Its nothing really special compared to most surfactant/wetting agents - its just a helluva lot stronger.  Three treatments on low spots that collect standing water after heavy rain or irrigation and they are gone.  The water absorbs into the soil like its a dry sponge.  It's good shit.

Thanks. I went a little happy with the pickaxe and to be honest it was hard to find the outer perimeter of the big ole pieces so i was kind of hacking around looking for it to dig in the pickaxe and dig it out like a fulcrum. I figured either way with this Texas heat it would be hard to get the same piece to survive on top after having experienced the shock of being dug out. Oh well, I don't mind it looking bad in that spot for a while till spring time since I also am killing off a tree trunk that a tornado left after it ripped out my tree. So the lawn basically has a big under construction sign out front lol. 

Thanks for the suggestions on the wetting agents, that sounds cool i'm definitely going to try that. And maybe look into a soil sample tool and find out where to send those off to see what I need. Also i considered aerating now and dropping in some peat moss and sand but I figured with this heat I might just provide holes for moisture to escape too quickly. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Francisco 2.0 said:

Rachio.  3rd Gen, 16 zone.

https://rachio.com/rachio-3/

 

 

 

I got one about 3 months ago and have been really happy with it. App is great. I haven’t gone through advanced settings per zone and typically use the general settings with additional times added to certain zones where needed. You really can set this one and never pay attention to it again. It accounts for time change, season and weather/rain skip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Note: he says "stop the spread"
That's step one, it stops dying. Recovery will take a while. 
The fungicide Azoxystrobin (sold as the consumer product Scotts Disease-EX and commercial product Heritage) does an excellent job of stopping the spread of TARR.
I'll see if I can find some more links on TARR. There are a couple of different replies from previous threads on this mess. 
probably time for a refresher 


All this. Scott DiseaseEX stopped the spread of my multiple TARR spots. Lots of bagging mows when it looked like it was flaring up. Lots of curative dosage. Several preventative dosages on rest of lawn. Several peat moss applications in the worst affected areas.

Unfortunately, I think I finally got it under control when I went to strictly disease ex application over various other fungicides in late fall outside of growing season. Last of my open soil areas finally grew and closed up this May

If you see any lime green leaf areas with brown roots or stolons in other areas of your yard hit that shit quick.

I did a preventative diseaseex application earlier this spring and won’t use any sprayer propiconazole this summer unless the diseaseEx doesn’t keep the nonTARR fungus under control.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/22/2020 at 7:49 PM, Francisco 2.0 said:

 

Replaced my '97 vintage Rainbird.  From opening box to joining up with app, took half an hour for installation.  Took another 15 minutes or so to test all 10 zones, answer some questions, etc.  Ran last night.  

Was it pretty simple to just switch the wires from the old unit to this one? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, ZB'Tejas said:

Was it pretty simple to just switch the wires from the old unit to this one? 

Honestly, it took longer to open up the Rainbird and document what the wires were than it did to actually install the Rachio and connect the wires.

Here's what I did:

-Took a half dozen or so pictures before I began of the existing wiring.

-Made note on the Rainbird wire loom of the labels (Zone 1, etc)

-Matched up the Zone 1 wire with whatever wire went outdoors (blue, yellow, whatever).  Started a list.  As I disconnected each wire from the Rainbird to the outdoor wire, I labeled each outdoor wire (Zone 1, Zone 2,).

-Hung the Rachio

-Plugged in each of the wires I labeled.

Go here; if you know the model of your existing controller, you may find that someone else has already did an upgrade and has documented it.  Plus any question you may think of might already be answered:

https://community.rachio.com/c/getting-started/23

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any suggestions for this? An area of my front lawn on one side of my house is being overtaken by dallisgrass from my neighbor's weed infested lawn and pulling the weeds in my half is pointless with all those weeds.

I've previously fertilized and put down pre-emergent but that area is out of control.

Do I just let it be and wait for winter when the bermuda goes dormant and hit the whole thing hard with glyphosate?

Goddamn fuckin dallisgrass, I hate that shit.e5845bd9b71d150d1dc72ca234218238.jpg

Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://neilsperry.com/2016/06/dealing-with-dallisgrass-2/

Basically, I'd say mow your lawn more, and be precise when spraying.

• Spot treat dallisgrass clumps in any type of lawn by using a glyphosate-only herbicide spray (no other active ingredients). You have to have very precise control of those places where you apply the weedkiller. It kills all grasses, not just dallisgrass.

• For that reason, a 1- or 2-gallon tank sprayer is the best option. You can set the spray nozzle on “medium” and apply the weedkiller carefully just to the weed. Sure, it will leave a spot of dead grass in your lawn, but better to have that than to have a solid lawn of dallisgrass a year or two from now.

• The reason I specified “a glyphosate-only” herbicide with no other active ingredients is because there are products out there containing glyphosate in tandem with long-lasting, soil active weedkillers. The glyphosate-only products will not contaminate the soil. Your lawngrass will be able to cover the bare spots on its own, or you can dig and move plugs of good turfgrass from elsewhere in your lawn into the bare spaces.

• Finally, a cool trick someone posted on my Facebook page. I don’t have a photo, but I can certainly describe it. Start with a 1-gallon plastic milk jug. Carefully cut the bottom out of the jug. Remove the cap. Place the jug over each clump of dallisgrass and insert the spray nozzle down into the jug. It will ensure precise application without spray drift onto the rest of your lawn.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks @workswithseed, I actually mow at least once a week, on average probably every five days or so. I'm mowing later this evening when it cools off a bit. My neighbors haven't mowed in about two weeks so I may just do them the favor and cut that part of their lawn myself as well. That shit is getting crazy right now. 

I assume Roundup isn't glyphosate-only? I have one of those Round Up Sure Shot Sprayers that I use on cracks in the driveway and selectively in isolated areas along my fence etc and I used it sparingly in some areas today on that dallisgrass. I didn't notice much afterspray effect, it seems pretty point-and-click. I assume I should invest in a good sprayer and a bottle of glyphosate and try your trick instead. 

Out of curiosity, do you know if Austin area lawn care companies use MSMA? I know it's not supposed to be used on residential properties but I wonder if some of the lawns on my street that don't have a lick of dallis (serviced by TruGreen and ABC) have been treated using MSMA. The homeowners that don't nerd out on their lawn like I do have yards that are covered in dallis. That crap is all over my neighorhood (99% bermuda lawns). It's just really pissing me off in that Carl Spackler kind of way. 

Also, I've treated with pre emergent twice already. Is pre emergent useless if my neighbor's yard is out of control?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Gourmand said:

Also, I've treated with pre emergent twice already. Is pre emergent useless if my neighbor's yard is out of control?

 

 

I think you need to be consistent with spring and fall applications of pre-emergent because not all the seed will try to germinate at the same time so it could take a few seasons to get it all.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...