Jump to content

Sous Vide Recipes and Shit


Recommended Posts

7 hours ago, Jimbaround said:

This thread interests me.  I pretty exclusively do steaks in mine and I need tsome branch and out dammit.

same here, i've only done steaks with mine and would like to branch out.  i've only found a handful of recipes in my brief online searches that really interest me (although the 72 hour short ribs interests me a lot)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sous vide fish once a week.  Whatever white fish looks good at costco — usually halibut or cod.  Olive oil, salt, and dill for 30-40 min at 132.  Pretty good, super easy. 

And I'm getting a ton of use out of my vacuum sealer. 

Edited by Mojo Hand
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, BabaYaga said:

How worthless is the Anova without a decent vacuum sealer?  

This. We hit Costco once a month, cut up the meat into family-size portions and season/package/vacuum seal them up and throw into freezer until ready to get our sous vide on. So easy and convenient. 

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, LoneStarBiker said:

This. We hit Costco once a month, cut up the meat into family-size portions and season/package/vacuum seal them up and throw into freezer until ready to get our sous vide on. So easy and convenient. 

As I've started butchering deer and hogs myself, and the SV technology is damn near perfect for lean game - I see my next two purchases!  

*been reverse-searing up to this point

Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, NoName said:

1) you can pick up a cheap refurb'd one for like $20 if you keep an eye out on slickdeals or set an alert

2) even without one you can do the Submersion technique (Anova link) that works pretty damn well in my experience. 

Now we're talking.  I've used those Ziploc Hand-pump vacuum sealed bags on deer steaks and they've worked pretty damn well.  That was my thought here.  Glad to see options.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Coyote said:

What temp are you cooking at and for how long?

Depends on the cut. 
Tenderloin/filet - I usually don't bother because I find the come out a bit mushy.
Strip - 129 - 130 for an hour to 1.5 hours.  Sometimes I do lower heat and sear longer, but if I am cooking longer than an hour or so I am concerned about bacteria growth.
Ribeye - 132 for an hour to 1.5 hours, but I could go even longer.  It depends if I want a ribeye texture or a prime rib texture.

Sometimes I add herbs and seasoning to the vacuum bag, sometimes not.

I stopped doing chicken since it tends to come out rubbery more often than not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've got an Anova that I only have ever done steaks with but they are pretty dummy proof (good for me).  I just use gallon zip lock bags - salt/pepper steak put in bag w/ sprig of thyme and two pats of butter, then submerge into water until covered (which effectively vacuums the bag around the meat) and seal.  I use my Le Creuset dutch oven and for two steaks, it's just enough water/room.  My wife likes her steak much more well done, so I cook hers at 148 for an hour, then ice the water down to 133 or 135 and put mine in for an hour.  Then I pat dry and let sit for a half hour or so before searing.

Pretty damn good every time.

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For chicken, don't give up until you do thighs SV style. I've been blown away by it.

 

for salmon/fish I saw an interesting take on it where they skinned it then curled it up and tied it with string, looked a helluva lot better than my failed attempt  

 

and submersion sealing works perfectly fine for SV cooks. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Jimbaround said:

Ha, it hasn't happened often, but I have had to do eight or ten steaks at once.

ahh i was curious and was going to ask for the recipe for anything that was good enough that required you to make that much at once

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 weeks later...
On 3/27/2018 at 8:08 AM, Mojo Hand said:

I sous vide fish once a week.  Whatever white fish looks good at costco — usually halibut or cod.  Olive oil, salt, and dill for 30-40 min at 132.  Pretty good, super easy. 

And I'm getting a ton of use out of my vacuum sealer. 

I've done sea bass sous vide, but nothing else.  Do you sear first, or do you skip the sear all together.  When I did the sea bass I seared first to prevent the thing falling apart after the sous vide.  It turned out great. I am cooking fish for 12-15 people and was thinking about doing a sous vide blackened salmon, primarily because I think that I can do most of the prep beforehand and finish in the sous vide with some time flexibility. I am thinking season and sear first, than in the dunk. It won't be a crispy blackened, will turn out very moist, but should still have the flavors without having to cook 12 at a time. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Anastasis said:

hmm. chicken never turns out rubbery for me, what temp/time are you using. 

160.  The chart I use says min temp of 146 and min time of 2.5 hours and max of 4-6 hours.  I do the min time.  It comes out fine probably more than half the time, but IMO it's not worth the risk of getting rubber chicken.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Temp and time are too long. I am too lazy to keep a temp log, but I did chicken last week @145. Texture at that temp is nothing close to rubbery, and may actually be a little off putting because it is totally novel texture for chicken compared to traditional temps. It has a soft mouth feel that some may or may not like. At minimum step down to 150 and see if you like that. Use the guidance at: https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/07/the-food-lab-complete-guide-to-sous-vide-chicken-breast.html  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Anastasis said:

I've done sea bass sous vide, but nothing else.  Do you sear first, or do you skip the sear all together.  When I did the sea bass I seared first to prevent the thing falling apart after the sous vide.  It turned out great. I am cooking fish for 12-15 people and was thinking about doing a sous vide blackened salmon, primarily because I think that I can do most of the prep beforehand and finish in the sous vide with some time flexibility. I am thinking season and sear first, than in the dunk. It won't be a crispy blackened, will turn out very moist, but should still have the flavors without having to cook 12 at a time. 

That's a good idea, because it does fall apart.  I suppose you could do a partial sear before and after to try to keep some crispness. I never sear though because I'm lazy and Halibut and turbot are good without searing.   I do freeze overnight beforehand to negate the risk of parasites. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Anastasis said:

Temp and time are too long. I am too lazy to keep a temp log, but I did chicken last week @145. Texture at that temp is nothing close to rubbery, and may actually be a little off putting because it is totally novel texture for chicken compared to traditional temps. It has a soft mouth feel that some may or may not like. At minimum step down to 150 and see if you like that. Use the guidance at: https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/07/the-food-lab-complete-guide-to-sous-vide-chicken-breast.html  

The chart I use came with my Sous Vide Supreme machine.  That soft texture you describe may be what I call rubbery.  It's not a tough rubbery--it's very tender.  There's no resistance as you bite down.  It's sort of gelatinous.  My wife will take one bite and spit it out and she's the type that will never trust the sous vide for anything else.  Chicken is easy enough to cook on the grill.  I use the sous vide for steaks, fajitas, and ribs, and for reheating BBQ brisket.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 4/28/2018 at 9:33 PM, bluto said:

Lobster tails are my next up. Read where you need to remove the shells first but all the writeups say it's incredible. 

link?  I tried them a few weeks ago and was disappointed.  Don't think I had the right temp/duration or something. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Biggest deal is getting the tail out of the shell in one piece, actually not hard at all... if frozen just put em in already boiling water for a minute then ice bath. From there it's easy peeling. 

Once free, sous vide at 130 for 40-60min with only a pad of butter in the bag

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Anastasis said:

Why do you have to take it out of the shell?

I tried to leave one in the shell.  I never could get the bag to seal without bursting (I use a vacuum sealer).  I ended up removing the shell.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/26/2018 at 10:00 AM, Anastasis said:

Temp and time are too long. I am too lazy to keep a temp log, but I did chicken last week @145. Texture at that temp is nothing close to rubbery, and may actually be a little off putting because it is totally novel texture for chicken compared to traditional temps. It has a soft mouth feel that some may or may not like. At minimum step down to 150 and see if you like that. Use the guidance at: https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/07/the-food-lab-complete-guide-to-sous-vide-chicken-breast.html  

So after you pull it do you finish it in an oven or on a grill to crisp the skin and get up to 160?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, PhillyD said:

I tried to leave one in the shell.  I never could get the bag to seal without bursting (I use a vacuum sealer).  I ended up removing the shell.

 

That makes sense.  Seems like you could pad it with some inert "padding". 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, irishtexan said:

So after you pull it do you finish it in an oven or on a grill to crisp the skin and get up to 160?

 

Sear in cast iron for the flavor introduced by that step. No need to get to 160, if you adhere to the right times and temps, you have basically pasteurized the chicken.  I use the sousvidedash app on phone as a double check on time/temps. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/26/2018 at 9:52 AM, HouTex said:

160.  The chart I use says min temp of 146 and min time of 2.5 hours and max of 4-6 hours.  I do the min time.  It comes out fine probably more than half the time, but IMO it's not worth the risk of getting rubber chicken.

Temp is fine. But way too long. I only do it for an hour and never had a problem not hitting temps and texture is fine. Not frozen though. that about doubles the length. 

I need to expand also, we keep doing Chicken breasts, Grass fed NY Strips, and Salmon 

 

Edited by msudawg
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, msudawg said:

Temp is fine. But way too long. I only do it for an hour and never had a problem not hitting temps and texture is fine. Not frozen though. that about doubles the length. 

I need to expand also, we keep doing Chicken breasts, Grass fed NY Strips, and Salmon 

 

never made Salmon in it, any recs?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...