Jump to content
Chilly Water

2018 Lawn and Landscape Thread

Recommended Posts

7 hours ago, cactusflinthead said:

There isn't a whole helluva lot that I have found so far. The only thing that has struck the brain pan is to slow down the common is a growth regulator. I found this from 1990

Good idea on the growth regulator.  Maybe I should get a little more aggressive  with Primo application this season.

I damned sure can't afford to re-sod every six years...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

May not be the thread, but does anyone have any inside info on upcoming mulch sales?  I need about 250 cu. ft. so I want to shop a bit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a shit load of mulch. I'd be shocked if you can get a deal on anything though. This is prime time for them, and every place I've talked to is booked for deliveries at least a week in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I've got about 2,000 square feet of beds that need somewhere between an inch and 1.5" to top it off.  Down the road, I may rethink the size of these beds, and let the grass grow in, in sections.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mexican Buckeye and Yellow Dog

20180329_093218_zpstegdn0sy.jpg

 

Found this guy drying out wings after the rain

20180329_093228_zpsqajwhzjy.jpg

Hope this crop makes it.  I've lost every peach the last couple years.  No damage found on the fruit yet.  I've been more aggressive with the orchard sprays this year.

20180329_093446_zpsr0pcl4ye.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What’s the best way to fertilize trees? I have two fairly small oaks in our front yard and they just haven’t grown much since we have been here the last two years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you thinning your peach trees? I have spent the last week stripping like 75% of the fruit buds based on my internet research. Internet says peaches need to be like minimum of 6-8 inches apart to promote larger fruit growth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WTF is this. It’s all over my back yard. Started out popping up in the flower beds, now it’s popping up in the grass. It grows fast. I can pull it up and it seems to disconnect from its root base. I’m sure there’s a tube somewhere. It smells weird when I pull it off. If I let it grow it will get a big bloom in the middle. It’s not something we want to keep.

20ff3b0fa4388b41ed4d563862d49982.jpgc0784f6853cca2c6d774d71ce0b55a54.jpg406bae25ca2e0dd8e6ced2241c21f724.jpgc34a941d37abf87e0e5eb3ebbd35649f.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, kmac30 said:

WTF is this. It’s all over my back yard. Started out popping up in the flower beds, now it’s popping up in the grass. It grows fast. I can pull it up and it seems to disconnect from its root base. I’m sure there’s a tube somewhere. It smells weird when I pull it off. If I let it grow it will get a big bloom in the middle. It’s not something we want to keep.

20ff3b0fa4388b41ed4d563862d49982.jpgc0784f6853cca2c6d774d71ce0b55a54.jpg406bae25ca2e0dd8e6ced2241c21f724.jpgc34a941d37abf87e0e5eb3ebbd35649f.jpg

Shit almost looks like poison ivy to me. I'm no expert though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not poison ivy. I think it is in the grape fam, but I have to dig some. 2,4-D or triclopyr. Tending towards triclopyr as it matures. Paint the cut off stem with it straight from the bottle. 2,4-D will probably take care of the seedlings.

Brush and stump killer
Confront
Remedy

All the same stuff but labeled homeowner, pro applicator, and agriculture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Longhornlax said:

What’s the best way to fertilize trees? I have two fairly small oaks in our front yard and they just haven’t grown much since we have been here the last two years.

It's not unusual to see them go slow the first couple of years. They are trying to get the root system established before investing in the new leaves.  A five gallon bucket with a weep hole is a cheap option. Plain old miracle-gro, root stimulator, Garrett juice, or any number of options will work. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, kmac30 said:


Thanks! This stuff is all over my yard. Want it gone this year

It will probably take several whacks to get it completely gone. It's a perennial vine, they typically have an extensive network. The seeds germinating are going to be an issue too. 

 

It might take a bit to ID this thing. I have seen it for a few years. It makes a smaller grape-like berry. No, I have not tried one. The overall structure of the plant makes me think it is in the grape family. Boston Ivy and Virginia creeper are in Vitaceae

Edited by cactusflinthead

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/29/2018 at 8:30 PM, swraith said:

Are you thinning your peach trees? I have spent the last week stripping like 75% of the fruit buds based on my internet research. Internet says peaches need to be like minimum of 6-8 inches apart to promote larger fruit growth.

Not yet but considering it.  I'm pretty sure I have too many.  I pruned it when the flowers were in bloom to remove some already but the set fruit is very dense and would probably break branches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty good pdf on thinning fruit. 

 

http://homeorchard.ucdavis.edu/8047.pdf

If you are going to do it, now is the time. There are other things that get thinned too or the other verb, disbudded. If you look at a florist quality mum you will see some cut spots around the flowers. That's where there used to be other flowers. You concentrate all the 'good stuff' and 'energy' (hormones and carbos and all the other stuff that makes shit grow) into that one flower or fruit and it will get bigger and Lord willing, tastier. There are also other benefits outlined in the info sheet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How much do I need to move from the old place? I am going to ask this same question on a couple of threads that I regularly participate in, but I would like some sort of idea how much stuff I need to go grab before the bottom falls out over there. 

It's a fucking ghost town and it looks weird now. The interface is all borked and shitty. He ain't gonna make a damn dime off that place now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not poison ivy. I think it is in the grape fam, but I have to dig some. 2,4-D or triclopyr. Tending towards triclopyr as it matures. Paint the cut off stem with it straight from the bottle. 2,4-D will probably take care of the seedlings.

Brush and stump killer
Confront
Remedy

All the same stuff but labeled homeowner, pro applicator, and agriculture.


Fuck that. Pour some diesel on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don’t think anything needs to be copied over. Nobody reads through prior content anyway. There’s some of us who follow regularly, but most folks just show up and ask questions that have been answered a dozen times already and we have to answer them again anyway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is the only thing that should be posted so we can easily direct people to it, but it would work better stickied to the top. 963ba50394e744f23d6a4fc0e3ee7902.jpg
 
That solves 90% of the questions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don’t think anything needs to be copied over. Nobody reads through prior content anyway. There’s some of us who follow regularly, but most folks just show up and ask questions that have been answered a dozen times already and we have to answer them again anyway
Troof

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m confused on when I can apply 2,4-D to St Augustine.

I used it last year and I think it was too close to 85F; it turned a lot of my yard yellow, and it killed some grass where I’m sure I over applied.

The over applied area now has quite a few weeds. Can I use the 2,4-D in the area and hope the St Augustine comes back? Should I just start over and re-sod the area?



Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got the bagger attachment for my ZTM so I could bag the first cut. Holy shit, between the leaves and cutting it lower I made about 40 of those Lowe’s bags.

Is it common for oaks to shed their leaves in the Spring? Mine hung on all winter ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't hate this hose end mix of either. 8cff4ea22f0461e29cd4f47970182fed.jpg196d0d9bb444cfa824be1bc7b390402d.jpg



I used that hose end Scott’s at the top and I couldn’t tell if it was dispensing. The volume never dropped so I couldn’t tell if my rate was right.

I emailed Scott’s and they said it was normal. I told them it was a design flaw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, SquishMitten said:

This is the only thing that should be posted so we can easily direct people to it, but it would work better stickied to the top. 963ba50394e744f23d6a4fc0e3ee7902.jpg

 

Would sticky it but can’t edit posts. If we can’t edit posts, the Kevin Morgans win.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Dark Horse said:

I’m confused on when I can apply 2,4-D to St Augustine.

I used it last year and I think it was too close to 85F; it turned a lot of my yard yellow, and it killed some grass where I’m sure I over applied.

The over applied area now has quite a few weeds. Can I use the 2,4-D in the area and hope the St Augustine comes back? Should I just start over and re-sod the area?


 

St. A is so damn fickle. Try a test spot at the lowest recommended rate. Resodding is not going to make the seed bank go away or keep new ones from drifting in on the wind. 

9 hours ago, GottaB said:

 

 


I used that hose end Scott’s at the top and I couldn’t tell if it was dispensing. The volume never dropped so I couldn’t tell if my rate was right.

I emailed Scott’s and they said it was normal. I told them it was a design flaw.

 

 

Good point. I like the mix they have in there, but if it is a shitty applicator it isn't worth the 10-15 bucks they are charging for them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NR-IMG_0961-225x300.jpg

 

When leaves don't leave

Quote

 

Deciduous trees typically lose all of their leaves by late autumn. But a stroll through the Arboretum reveals a scattering of deciduous trees and shrubs that still have leaves (albeit dry and brown) clinging tightly to branches. These plants are exhibiting marcescence, the trait of retaining plant parts after they are dead and dry. Marcescence most often refers to persistent leaves but can also refer to other parts such as flower corollas.

Leaf marcescence is most often seen on juvenile plants and may disappear as the tree matures. It also may not affect the entire tree; sometimes leaves persist only on scattered branches. Unlike a typical deciduous leaf, a marcescent leaf doesn’t develop an abscission zone, an area at the base of the petiole containing a separation layer (thin-walled cells that break readily, allowing leaf drop) and, on the twig side, a protective layer of corky cells. The evolutionary reasons for marcescence are not clear, though theories include defense against herbivory (e.g., browsing by deer), protection of leaf buds from winter desiccation, and as a delayed source of nutrients or moisture-conserving mulch when the leaves finally fall and decompose in the spring.

Some woody plant species are more likely to exhibit marcescense than others. One of the most striking marcescent tree species is American beech (Fagus grandifolia), whose papery, pale tan winter leaves provide an easy identification feature as well as adding a ghostly shimmer in snow-filled woodlands. Many oak (Quercus) species are notably marcescent, and some hornbeams (Carpinus) and hophornbeams [pdf] (Ostrya) also tend to hold their leaves. Some witch-hazels [pdf](Hamamelis) may retain foliage, which unfortunately can detract from the floral display of these winter-blooming shrubs. And if you visit the Arboretum this winter, note the handsomely marcescent specimens of narrow-leaved spicebush (Lindera angustifolia 740-75) along Bussey Road across from the lilac collection

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Decided this is the year to tackle the weeds in my mixed grass yard - mainly Bermuda but some St. Augustine in the side yard in the shade. Lots of mixed weeds, especially over septic where they are just about crowding out the Bermuda.  Kicker is I just broke my foot, so I can't do anything myself, foot can't touch the ground for 8 weeks.  Anybody have experience using Chem Free in the Austin area?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Horn of Gabriel said:

Got the bagger attachment for my ZTM so I could bag the first cut. Holy shit, between the leaves and cutting it lower I made about 40 of those Lowe’s bags.

Is it common for oaks to shed their leaves in the Spring? Mine hung on all winter ...

Live oak, yes. Will shed between February and May.  Mine always seems to drop right after I put down mulch. 

On 3/30/2018 at 8:54 AM, kmac30 said:

WTF is this. It’s all over my back yard. Started out popping up in the flower beds, now it’s popping up in the grass. It grows fast. I can pull it up and it seems to disconnect from its root base. I’m sure there’s a tube somewhere. It smells weird when I pull it off. If I let it grow it will get a big bloom in the middle. It’s not something we want to keep.

20ff3b0fa4388b41ed4d563862d49982.jpgc0784f6853cca2c6d774d71ce0b55a54.jpg406bae25ca2e0dd8e6ced2241c21f724.jpgc34a941d37abf87e0e5eb3ebbd35649f.jpg

Pretty sure this is a type of hackberry. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Horn of Gabriel said:

Got the bagger attachment for my ZTM so I could bag the first cut. Holy shit, between the leaves and cutting it lower I made about 40 of those Lowe’s bags.

Is it common for oaks to shed their leaves in the Spring? Mine hung on all winter ...

Yes, Live oaks don't drop leaves until the spring and new ones are ready to pop out,  that is why they are called live oaks, they are semi-evergreen.  Monterrey Oaks also do this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We can tag people.  [mention=541]cactusflinthead[/mention]
 
I need to pick up a 3-way herbicide post-emergent to spray.  What should I get?  Eradicating poa, broadleaf weeds, clovers, etc.  I have bermuda and st aug
Celsius. Made by Bayer. About $150 on Amazon. Put about a tablespoon in a 4 gallon pump up sprayer with a surfactant and some blue dye and just spray the yard. In 2 weeks everything will be dead except the Bermuda and st Augustine.

It's the only thing I've found that will kill Virginia buttonweed.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pretty sure this is a type of hackberry. 


That’s why I was going to suggest based solely off the leaves, but Cactus seemed confident about grapes so I kept it to myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some wild grape in my backyard and some at my last place. The leaves look similar so I couldn’t rule it out but the stems made me go hackberry. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's a shit load of mulch. I'd be shocked if you can get a deal on anything though. This is prime time for them, and every place I've talked to is booked for deliveries at least a week in advance.


Friday found a pallet of 75 bags of the no-float stuff for $2.32 a bag. I’ve spread about half the load so far, but the drive home was comical but short enough
08c8d32398e08eddbe8de179c3385a3d.jpg
bce0980b98c180be849bae3de9d53712.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, BearSchlong said:

Celsius. Made by Bayer. About $150 on Amazon. Put about a tablespoon in a 4 gallon pump up sprayer with a surfactant and some blue dye and just spray the yard. In 2 weeks everything will be dead except the Bermuda and st Augustine.

It's the only thing I've found that will kill Virginia buttonweed.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

Big fan of Celsius here, well worth the money.  Especially nice to use in hot weather, in that it doesn't burn the grass like other herbicides can do in the heat.  Add in some Certainty if you have a sedge problem, and this may be all you'll ever need.  And, whatever you do, don't skip out on the surfactant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, chikin23 said:

Going to try this. Seems like it'll last a few years.

 

Any specific surfactant?

Any nonionic surfactant will do; available at any garden store.  Unless you're spraying a cotton field, get the smallest container you can find.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Spur08 said:

Why the blue dye?

Blue dye, also known as turf marker, is so  you can see where you have sprayed; this stuff (Celsius) is high-dollar, so you definitely do not want to double-spray.  I guess burnt orange turf marker would be preferable, if you can find it....

Edited by Eddyline

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...