Jump to content
bigup2dahorns

Mensa offense vs Big 12 defenses

Recommended Posts

On 10/15/2018 at 1:06 PM, tonedeaf said:

Defenses always catch up...…..eventually. 

They never did catch up to the Wishbone. Teams moved away from it because 8-9-10-11 in the box made it so easy to score over the top.

But no one ever developed defensive scheme that shut down the bone. All they could do is stack the box and hope their athelets were better than the others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Snacks said:

Why recruit a qb that can't run your system.

Gdgg was recruited to ruin it back in Mack's day. But that was a dual effort by gdgd and gdgg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Gaffords said:

They never did catch up to the Wishbone. Teams moved away from it because 8-9-10-11 in the box made it so easy to score over the top.

But no one ever developed defensive scheme that shut down the bone. All they could do is stack the box and hope their athelets were better than the others.

OK.  But the problem was I don't remember any wishbone team that had a QB that was proficient enough in the passing game to really hurt anyone.  True, some of our most memorable plays were pass plays (Ark.  ND, UCLA)  but they were few and far between.  But you are correct, it all boils down to athletes (or athlelets if that's what you want to call it).  That is still true today.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night Craig Way asked TH about his game rituals and superstitions.  Herman said he wasn't a superstitious person but he did have some rituals.  Then said they were more like neuroses and OCD behavior.  It's kinda funny that Herman sees himself that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, sushihorn said:

Last night Craig Way asked TH about his game rituals and superstitions.  Herman said he wasn't a superstitious person but he did have some rituals.  Then said they were more like neuroses and OCD behavior.  It's kinda funny that Herman sees himself that way.

He can say that.  But he's been wearing that super ugly short-sleeved orange windbreaker every game of our winning streak.  I expect he'll be wearing it in Stilly this weekend, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Katfid54 said:

He can say that.  But he's been wearing that super ugly short-sleeved orange windbreaker every game of our winning streak.  I expect he'll be wearing it in Stilly this weekend, too.

It's not the windbreaker that is good or bad luck, its WEARING FUCKING BLACK. C'mon Herman, put on the damn school colors.

My wife hated TH until he stopped wearing that shit, now she tolerates him.

We have the best damn school colors in the nation, and he used to choose to wear damn tech or frog black.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Zavala said:
5 minutes ago, Katfid54 said:

He can say that.  But he's been wearing that super ugly short-sleeved orange windbreaker every game of our winning streak.  I expect he'll be wearing it in Stilly this weekend, too.

It's not the windbreaker that is good or bad luck, its WEARING FUCKING BLACK. C'mon Herman, put on the damn school colors.

My wife hated TH until he stopped wearing that shit, now she tolerates him.

We have the best damn school colors in the nation, and he used to choose to wear damn tech or frog black.

What a weird non-sequitur to the discussion of whether Herman is superstitious or OCD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Katfid54 said:

What a weird non-sequitur to the discussion of whether Herman is superstitious or OCD.

He's on the autism spectrum, so probably part-OCD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Zavala said:

It's not the windbreaker that is good or bad luck, its WEARING FUCKING BLACK. C'mon Herman, put on the damn school colors.

My wife hated TH until he stopped wearing that shit, now she tolerates him.

We have the best damn school colors in the nation, and he used to choose to wear damn tech or frog black.

I could swear I remember him saying early in his tenure he wore black so it was easier for players to find him on the sideline.  I'm all about him wearing orange, but I think there was an actual reason for his ridiculous black shit.

And yes, TH is somewhere on the spectrum.  

Edited by Wally Banger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Wally Banger said:

I could swear I remember him saying early in his tenure he wore black so it was easier for players to find him on the sideline.  I'm all about him wearing orange, but I think there was an actual reason for his ridiculous black shit.

And yes, TH is somewhere on the spectrum.  

Yeah I get that, but also, just wear lime green pants or something if you wanna be seen. Don't not wear burnt orange bruh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Zavala said:

Yeah I get that, but also, just wear lime green pants or something if you wanna be seen. Don't not wear burnt orange bruh

Mr. Green Jeans?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Zavala said:

Yeah I get that, but also, just wear lime green pants or something if you wanna be seen. Don't not wear burnt orange bruh

 

47 minutes ago, hornian said:

Mr. Green Jeans?

Don't Make A Shit. 

Scoreboard control is all that matters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They never did catch up to the Wishbone. Teams moved away from it because 8-9-10-11 in the box made it so easy to score over the top.
But no one ever developed defensive scheme that shut down the bone. All they could do is stack the box and hope their athelets were better than the others.
Wat?

The wishbone can be stopped. It requires discipline and the defense staying in their assigned lanes to shut down the ballcarrier no matter which player gets the ball. If a d can do that the wishbone CAN be stopped.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who gives a flying fuck what our coach wears (as long as it isn't the "my wife thinks I'm straight" Jim Tressel sweater vest). Just win. 

images%252Fslides%252F2_bellechic.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/26/2018 at 4:37 PM, MrPhlegm said:

Wat?

The wishbone can be stopped. It requires discipline and the defense staying in their assigned lanes to shut down the ballcarrier no matter which player gets the ball. If a d can do that the wishbone CAN be stopped.

LBs becoming faster and more athletic had a lot to do with it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/8/2018 at 4:26 PM, sushihorn said:

For the SEC and B1G teams Herman's offense will not require much adjustment except in detail.  It has many similarities to what OhSt has been running or for that matter to what Alabama is moving towards.  Herman's offensive scheme won't give Texas any systemic advantage against them.  By the same token, the Texas D will be well prepared to face offenses that look like what they see in practice.

The primary impact here is on Big XII match ups since spread passing has become the dominant form of offense - especially among the better teams.

 

On 10/8/2018 at 5:45 PM, sushihorn said:

That's fair to the extent we are talking about top teams.  But they do see this type of attack in the SEC with MSU and (as you point out) Auburn.  The other members of the SEC at least see power run based spread and have defenses designed to stop power running if not run spread per se.  They require less adjustment to defend Texas than a defense playing a base nickel that is effectively a dime defense with a DB at SAM.

 

On 10/8/2018 at 6:01 PM, sushihorn said:

Absolutely.  Seeking contact and punishing defenders is an important part of what Herman is doing.  That really shows results after 3 quarters of pounding if you can sustain drives.  I think of OU's offense as Aikido and Texas as Krav Maga

Thanks for the timely bump. I feel this is a very candid assessment of how a smashmouth spead could fare against a team like UGA. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, So_co said:

Thanks for the timely bump. I feel this is a very candid assessment of how a smashmouth spead could fare against a team like UGA. 

Just FYI.  Since I wrote the original piece, Texas has been forced to move away from the run based power spread to an extent and back towards a conventional (for the Big XII) passing spread.  Injury to our starting QB has made the coaches less willing to give him 15-20 carries per game and Sam is arguably our most punishing ball carrier.  There will still be plenty of zone reads and RPOs but the proportion of QB power and QB counter in the play mix is down by more than half. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, sushihorn said:

Just FYI.  Since I wrote the original piece, Texas has been forced to move away from the run based power spread to an extent and back towards a conventional (for the Big XII) passing spread.  Injury to our starting QB has made the coaches less willing to give him 15-20 carries per game and Sam is arguably our most punishing ball carrier.  There will still be plenty of zone reads and RPOs but the proportion of QB power and QB counter in the play mix is down by more than half. 

i mean, shouldn't injuries to your starting QB always be the concern? 

or once it happens then its a concern? 

i think the QB needs like 5 designed runs and maybe 3 to 5 improvs a game max, but I am no corch

also Sam's passing ability really went up this year, like waaaay up

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, staboner said:

i mean, shouldn't injuries to your starting QB always be the concern? 

or once it happens then its a concern? 

i think the QB needs like 5 designed runs and maybe 3 to 5 improvs a game max, but I am no corch

also Sam's passing ability really went up this year, like waaaay up

and this is the beauty if VY's last year. the designed runs had scared the shit out of defenses for so long. so we passed. and passed at will lots of teh time because shit was always open. we were able to just relied on VY's improv runs to maintain fear in the defensive coach's mind. it was glorious. best scoring offense to date then

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/29/2018 at 11:12 AM, staboner said:

i mean, shouldn't injuries to your starting QB always be the concern? 

or once it happens then its a concern? 

i think the QB needs like 5 designed runs and maybe 3 to 5 improvs a game max, but I am no corch

also Sam's passing ability really went up this year, like waaaay up

Until the injury, Sam ran as much as needed to win the game.  He had 18 carries in the Cotton Bowl and 15 against USC.  That was cut down to 9 vs OK State and 10 vs WVU.  One more sustained drive in either of those games would have been the difference but there weren't many designed runs for the QB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, sushihorn said:

Until the injury, Sam ran as much as needed to win the game.  He had 18 carries in the Cotton Bowl and 15 against USC.  That was cut down to 9 vs OK State and 10 vs WVU.  One more sustained drive in either of those games would have been the difference but there weren't many designed runs for the QB.

It’s more the way he runs. He looks to initiate contact. Obviously the more runs there are the more chances to get hit, but I think it’s more the way Sam doesn’t protect his body.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, taybo20 said:

It’s more the way he runs. He looks to initiate contact. Obviously the more runs there are the more chances to get hit, but I think it’s more the way Sam doesn’t protect his body.

Yep. Three years from now, I expect RoJo to take over, and nobody will be calling for him to run less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I absolutely love the adjustments that Herman and (dare I say it) Beck made to attack a Georgia defense that was very strong up the gut.  It's even more impressive since Kirby mostly showed 3 DL formations during the season but Texas was prepared for the heavy diet of 4 DL that UGa actually showed.  With a 3 man front the void is off tackle.  With 4 DL the strongside C gap is well defended to the Horns reacted by running a lot of their offense off the slot man instead of off tackle early on. That exploited the loss of speed and flow to the outside from Georgia's trading a LB for another DL.

The other key adjustment was getting Georgia even more spread out than the base 11 personnel normally does.  Beck spent a lot of time split out for a 4 wide look.  Texas used a lot more of that and empty sets to get the defense strung out before hitting them with the QB lead, power and counter inside.  5 defemders om the box against 5 blockers leaves a lot more space and creates better blocking angles than 6 on 6 in the same space.  It neutralized the size and strength of the UGa defenders by forcing ALL of them to defend in space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice article from this past season discussing the emerging counter-trend in the Big XII led by Texas and Iowa State but also including Baylor.  Power spread rushing attacks as the answer to the Air Raid - which is a sufficiently potent attack that you have to address it on BOTH sides of the ball.

The Bash bros are coming for the Raid bros

Quote

Iowa State, Baylor, and Texas all hired some guys with Midwestern, power football roots in Matt Campbell, Matt Rhule, Tom Herman. All have leaned heavily on tight zone, big TEs that can block a DE, and emphasizing defense as a primary means to victory and not the team’s second class citizens.

Quote

 

All three teams lean pretty heavily on the “tight zone” play, which is a physical and downhill run concept that relies on having a big TE on the field who can block up a DE:

Baylor Tight Zone Vs Ou GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

I’ll spare West Virginia fans watching their defense try to stop this play against Iowa State and David Montgomery for now. I’ll also note that the push that Baylor got on this play against OU was nothing to what Texas did to them the following week in Dallas.

The design of this play is to hit up the A-gap or else to cut back unless the LBs flow to the backside where the TE is located, in that event a good RB cuts back to the play side. Texas’ Keaontay Ingram excels at that cut. The backside is where the double teams and the push is, often teams defend it by just trying to spill the ball outside the TE where it becomes a RB coming downhill on a DB that’s trying to slide over and make the stop.

If the DB is up for that, it’s a 1-3 yard gain, if not then he’s laying prone on the ground while the back is rampaging downfield. It’s a very physical play and none of the Baylor, Texas, or Iowa State OL this year are as good on the concept as they’re likely to be next season when their meaner and hand-picked OL enter year three in each respective program.

People often confuse this as being a zone-read play and the QB CAN keep the ball on the edge but it’s much more of a downhill RB concept. The QB will generally get a pass or keep option if the overhang DB I just described is coming down hard off the slot to make the stop on the back in the cutback lane.

Teams usually run the play with a TE or offset H-back to the same side as the RB and then a slot and outside receiver to that side as well. Then they’ll generally have the two WRs run a bubble screen or some kind of two-man route combo. Above Baylor is running a switch route combo.

Then the read is on the overhang DB. If he crashes over the edge, the QB can keep the ball:

Ehlinger Tight Zone Keeper Vs Ou GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

 

Tom Herman often speaks of the importance of the TE.  It's absolutely critical to get production from that position and replacing Beck is an big priority for next year.  Also I was one of those people watching tight zone run and mistaking it for Zone Read.  The QB keeper is only a constraint if the slot defender crashes down hard.  So basically it's a 95% inside zone play to the RB with a built in counter rather than an option play in the traditional sense.

It's a great article and there's a bunch more meat in there.  Hopefully this discussion will help us get through the long offseason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have not read all of this thread, but here's part of how Belichick develops young assistant coaches:

http://footballscoop.com/news/secret-bill-belichicks-development-young-coaches/

 

There’s certainly a well calculated method to how Belichick prepares for everything that comes across his desk as he prepares for games, and Yahoo! Sports outlined a specific task he gives to his young assistants that they both have a deep appreciation for, and loathe beyond question.

The task is called “padding games.”

When padding games, assistants are required to watch tape of a given game and — on every single play — draw the offense and defense on a sheet of paper, and map out the movement and assignment of each player on the field. They’re also asked to note everything from receiver and offensive-line splits to tendencies and protections, along with deeper observations about what players on each side are trying to accomplish on the play.

Assistants are given the responsibility of padding four our five games of upcoming opponents at a time, and a single game can take anywhere from seven hours to a couple of days.

Offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels, who left the Patriots for a two-year run as the head coach of the Broncos from 2009-10 before returning to the staff, cites padding games as the the most important things he’s ever done as an assistant.

“I think the most important thing young people have got to understand is, it’s not a punishment. It’s a tremendous opportunity to learn how important everything is at this level,” McDaniels shared.

 

More in-depth discussion here:

https://sports.yahoo.com/bill-belichicks-old-school-method-developing-coaches-starts-pencils-papers-patience-144917817.html

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/26/2018 at 11:50 AM, sushihorn said:

Last night Craig Way asked TH about his game rituals and superstitions.  Herman said he wasn't a superstitious person but he did have some rituals.  Then said they were more like neuroses and OCD behavior.  It's kinda funny that Herman sees himself that way.

Could be his therapist sees him that way and TH just went with it.

😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/3/2019 at 11:16 PM, LTtxfan said:

Have not read all of this thread, but here's part of how Belichick develops young assistant coaches:

http://footballscoop.com/news/secret-bill-belichicks-development-young-coaches/

 

There’s certainly a well calculated method to how Belichick prepares for everything that comes across his desk as he prepares for games, and Yahoo! Sports outlined a specific task he gives to his young assistants that they both have a deep appreciation for, and loathe beyond question.

The task is called “padding games.”

When padding games, assistants are required to watch tape of a given game and — on every single play — draw the offense and defense on a sheet of paper, and map out the movement and assignment of each player on the field. They’re also asked to note everything from receiver and offensive-line splits to tendencies and protections, along with deeper observations about what players on each side are trying to accomplish on the play.

Assistants are given the responsibility of padding four our five games of upcoming opponents at a time, and a single game can take anywhere from seven hours to a couple of days.

Offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels, who left the Patriots for a two-year run as the head coach of the Broncos from 2009-10 before returning to the staff, cites padding games as the the most important things he’s ever done as an assistant.

“I think the most important thing young people have got to understand is, it’s not a punishment. It’s a tremendous opportunity to learn how important everything is at this level,” McDaniels shared.

 

More in-depth discussion here:

https://sports.yahoo.com/bill-belichicks-old-school-method-developing-coaches-starts-pencils-papers-patience-144917817.html

Looks like punishment. A good high school coach could easily communicate the very elements that McDaniel’s points out. Writing them down is a little silly, sounds like busy work.

Belicheks genius is rooted in what he doesn’t share with his assistants. And why they continue to struggle to compete against him when they go out on their own. That shit is proprietary, and he doesn’t share.

Others have tried to duplicate his methods, yet always fall short. And that is after spending years with the guy. Not to mention his intuition on when he knows it’s time to jettison a player that makes no sense to anyone, but himself. And find a guy no one wanted to fill the void. Or find a fault in another team’s framework and exploit it. Because His guys do their jobs better then his opponents tend to do.

I wouldn’t dare to guess the what or how he does things. But I damn sure hope he writes at length about it when he hangs it up. I’m going to guess it would change a lot of what is currently being done. Though he probably will not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/26/2018 at 11:50 AM, sushihorn said:

Last night Craig Way asked TH about his game rituals and superstitions.  Herman said he wasn't a superstitious person but he did have some rituals.  Then said they were more like neuroses and OCD behavior.  It's kinda funny that Herman sees himself that way.

I watched The Accountant last night and the main character (Ben Affleck) reminded me of TH. /csb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Looks like punishment. A good high school coach could easily communicate the very elements that McDaniel’s points out. Writing them down is a little silly, sounds like busy work.
Belicheks genius is rooted in what he doesn’t share with his assistants. And why they continue to struggle to compete against him when they go out on their own. That shit is proprietary, and he doesn’t share.
Others have tried to duplicate his methods, yet always fall short. And that is after spending years with the guy. Not to mention his intuition on when he knows it’s time to jettison a player that makes no sense to anyone, but himself. And find a guy no one wanted to fill the void. Or find a fault in another team’s framework and exploit it. Because His guys do their jobs better then his opponents tend to do.
I wouldn’t dare to guess the what or how he does things. But I damn sure hope he writes at length about it when he hangs it up. I’m going to guess it would change a lot of what is currently being done. Though he probably will not.
Sounds like the 'punishment' is part of what he did differently. Having it all written down allows him to catalog, sort, and who knows what else. It's collected data vs interpreted data (although there is some interp in the collected data.)

Also, the process creates focus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/30/2018 at 1:40 PM, Walden Ponderer said:

Yep. Three years from now, I expect RoJo to take over, and nobody will be calling for him to run less.

Casey Thompson is also a very competent runner. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, USNALonghorn said:

I watched The Accountant last night and the main character (Ben Affleck) reminded me of TH. /csb

Mensa Tom.  The Accountant character was a "high-functioning autistic"...... Some believe that since they're often so intellectually advanced and gifted, they struggle in the "real world" because they see/hear things through a different prism and are so misunderstood. 

Kinda like being lost in a foreign country where you can't seem to communicate with the locals,  eventhough you are highly more advanced and intelligent.

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/2/2019 at 6:28 PM, sushihorn said:

I absolutely love the adjustments that Herman and (dare I say it) Beck made to attack a Georgia defense that was very strong up the gut.  It's even more impressive since Kirby mostly showed 3 DL formations during the season but Texas was prepared for the heavy diet of 4 DL that UGa actually showed.  With a 3 man front the void is off tackle.  With 4 DL the strongside C gap is well defended to the Horns reacted by running a lot of their offense off the slot man instead of off tackle early on. That exploited the loss of speed and flow to the outside from Georgia's trading a LB for another DL.

The other key adjustment was getting Georgia even more spread out than the base 11 personnel normally does.  Beck spent a lot of time split out for a 4 wide look.  Texas used a lot more of that and empty sets to get the defense strung out before hitting them with the QB lead, power and counter inside.  5 defemders om the box against 5 blockers leaves a lot more space and creates better blocking angles than 6 on 6 in the same space.  It neutralized the size and strength of the UGa defenders by forcing ALL of them to defend in space.

Do you think this will be a similar game plan for LSU in September?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure where to post this, so decided it might fit here with all the X's and O's stuff

New Defensive Strategies: Simulated Pressure System

https://td328-5f8d55.pages.infusionsoft.net

From Article:

The Simulated Pressure System

"The low-risk, high-reward pressure package that is super-easy for defensive coordinators—and a flat-out “nightmare” for offensive coordinators, quarterbacks, o-line coaches, and running backs… because it gives your defensive coordinator the ability to dictate, then manipulate protection schemes."

If you haven’t heard of Simulated Pressures, or “Replace” blitzes as they are also known, don’t worry. You’re not alone. It’s the hottest new pressure trend this off-season—and for good reason. This new pressure system flat-out keeps offensive coordinators in a lose/lose situation by bringing control back to the defense.

My research team and I have been tracking this system for a few years. It’s the brain-child of some of the most effective defensive minds in all of football…

  • Dave Aranda, Defensive Coordinator, LSU
  • Pete Golding, Defensive Coordinator, Alabama
  • Ron Roberts, Defensive Coordinator, University of Louisiana

In simple terms, Simulated Pressure is four-man rushes that attack an aspect of the protection or blocking scheme by overloading that particular player or side. This part of it is no different than any other pressure package. But, the difference in Simulated Pressure is that by only sending four in the rush (and not five), coverage isn’t compromised like a traditional fire zone.

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting article on the advantages of hurry-up, no-huddle spread (HUNH spread)  in attracting transfers and freshmen who want to see the field immediately.  

College football is already close to becoming “basketball on grass” on a national scale.  Seven-on-seven travel teams and the proliferation of private skills coaching have a lot to do with the modern high school player's development in Texas, California and Florida.

"The advancement of skill level amongst HS players increased the lethality of the college passing attack. Young players often get high-level instruction and year-round reps making reads and throws."

Together, the transfer portal and the spread can make a plug-and-play offense a lot easier to develop. The 2018 Big 12 season was an illustration of how the sport’s moved. The four strongest teams in the conference benefitted from increased skill development at the high school level and blue-chip skill players transferring in.

"A national mood toward encouraging player free agency is making it increasingly easy for teams to assemble new, talented units. If you operate a system like this, it’s hard to avoid being a destination for talented skill players. If you don’t, it gets harder to woo them."

https://www.sbnation.com/college-football/2019/2/11/18200710/ncaa-transfers-spread-offense

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/8/2019 at 8:17 AM, LTtxfan said:

Not sure where to post this, so decided it might fit here with all the X's and O's stuff

New Defensive Strategies: Simulated Pressure System

https://td328-5f8d55.pages.infusionsoft.net

From Article:

The Simulated Pressure System

"The low-risk, high-reward pressure package that is super-easy for defensive coordinators—and a flat-out “nightmare” for offensive coordinators, quarterbacks, o-line coaches, and running backs… because it gives your defensive coordinator the ability to dictate, then manipulate protection schemes."

If you haven’t heard of Simulated Pressures, or “Replace” blitzes as they are also known, don’t worry. You’re not alone. It’s the hottest new pressure trend this off-season—and for good reason. This new pressure system flat-out keeps offensive coordinators in a lose/lose situation by bringing control back to the defense.

My research team and I have been tracking this system for a few years. It’s the brain-child of some of the most effective defensive minds in all of football…

  • Dave Aranda, Defensive Coordinator, LSU
  • Pete Golding, Defensive Coordinator, Alabama
  • Ron Roberts, Defensive Coordinator, University of Louisiana

In simple terms, Simulated Pressure is four-man rushes that attack an aspect of the protection or blocking scheme by overloading that particular player or side. This part of it is no different than any other pressure package. But, the difference in Simulated Pressure is that by only sending four in the rush (and not five), coverage isn’t compromised like a traditional fire zone.

I feel like defense has been going this way for a while. Even Manny Diaz had the "exotic" (stupid) blitzes where he'd overload a side with 4 or 5 guys max. Orlando does it as well, or send 2 backers but then just replaces one or two as a D Lineman drops back.

This is pretty much what the Patriots did to Jared Goff too. Sent "blitzes" that really only wound up with 4 or 5 guys rushing and everyone else in coverage. Overload a side or just make it seem like backers are coming from everywhere and they had Goff shitting his pants for 4 boring-ass quarters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I feel like defense has been going this way for a while. Even Manny Diaz had the "exotic" (stupid) blitzes where he'd overload a side with 4 or 5 guys max. Orlando does it as well, or send 2 backers but then just replaces one or two as a D Lineman drops back.
This is pretty much what the Patriots did to Jared Goff too. Sent "blitzes" that really only wound up with 4 or 5 guys rushing and everyone else in coverage. Overload a side or just make it seem like backers are coming from everywhere and they had Goff shitting his pants for 4 boring-ass quarters.
Y U no like defense?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Tex Long said:

I side with Saint Darrell - I don't care if we win 13-10 or 48-45, as long as we win. Scoreboard control.

Speaking of 48-45...... 🤘 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Snacks said:
1 hour ago, BurdineBandit said:
I feel like defense has been going this way for a while. Even Manny Diaz had the "exotic" (stupid) blitzes where he'd overload a side with 4 or 5 guys max. Orlando does it as well, or send 2 backers but then just replaces one or two as a D Lineman drops back.
This is pretty much what the Patriots did to Jared Goff too. Sent "blitzes" that really only wound up with 4 or 5 guys rushing and everyone else in coverage. Overload a side or just make it seem like backers are coming from everywhere and they had Goff shitting his pants for 4 boring-ass quarters.

Y U no like defense?

Lol, the "stupid" part was only towards Manny iaz. I always thought his were stupid because he would run those blitzes at the most inopportune times, like against Taysom Hill, who would just run where the blitz wasn't coming from. Or he'd run a blitz with 4 guys standing up, which I really hated because nobody would fire off the ball, they'd all just titty fight with the O-line.

I love when Orlando runs blitzes to rattle a guy like Purdy, or even Fromm. The hits definitely give a guy happy feet, but just sending looks can fuck up his brain and I love watching that play out in real time. Nothing quite as satisfying as when a QB is rattled by your team's defense and starts floating/skipping balls, dumping off to RBs or ditching the pocket too soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LTtxfan said:

Speaking of 48-45...... 🤘 

 

Weird how a sea of empty seats starts right about the 50 yard line.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I was watching this video... and I had a bit of a revelation. There's going to be some REALLY fun offensive football coming up. I know we scored on some skill positions, but Jesus that WR room is going to be insane. Someones gonna have take a redshirt. Either way, as much as I begged for 4 wide and a RB last year, I think the real option coming up these next couple of years may be a WR playing in the backfield.

Who did Timmy Tebow have providing speed around the edge while he threatened to smash it up the gut? Percy Harvin. It looks like we recruited 3 WRs that can play out the backfield. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, BurdineBandit said:

Lol, the "stupid" part was only towards Manny iaz. I always thought his were stupid because he would run those blitzes at the most inopportune times, like against Taysom Hill, who would just run where the blitz wasn't coming from. Or he'd run a blitz with 4 guys standing up, which I really hated because nobody would fire off the ball, they'd all just titty fight with the O-line.

I love when Orlando runs blitzes to rattle a guy like Purdy, or even Fromm. The hits definitely give a guy happy feet, but just sending looks can fuck up his brain and I love watching that play out in real time. Nothing quite as satisfying as when a QB is rattled by your team's defense and starts floating/skipping balls, dumping off to RBs or ditching the pocket too soon.

Those late disguise blitzes with DBs are awesome. Send em late so they are unblocked, send a fast mother fucker with their hair on fire. As long as they have a good feel for the QBs escapibility that shit works really well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/28/2018 at 4:34 PM, sushihorn said:

Interesting article from last season on how Big XII defenses have adapted to the Air Raid and other forms of spread offense:

https://www.footballstudyhall.com/2017/11/3/16599180/why-dime-is-now-base-defense-in-the-big-12

Posting here, seems like it matches discussion on modern offenses and defenses

Article on UCF offense.....

https://www.footballstudyhall.com/2019/2/20/18232489/how-close-to-greatness-is-central-florida-spread-iso-offense-josh-heupel-lsu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...