Jump to content

Is this email a scam?


Recommended Posts

apple_logo.png
 

You have reached your storage limit

 

 

 

image.thumb.png.36862851a69d539afe6374f0fbf12246.png

Dear customer, 
Your iCloud storage is full.

But, as part of your loyalty program, you can now receive an additional
50 GB for free before the files on your iCloud Drive are deleted.

 
Receive 50 GB
* After signing up, you have to insert your credit card details for validation of your Apple ID.
We will not withdraw any amount.
Copyright © 2023. All rights reserved.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes. 1- wouldn’t be free. 2- if they know who you are and what your storage usage is, they can refer to you by name and not dear customer.  3- why would anything be deleted if you don’t do this? 4- why is it “your” loyalty program instead of theirs?

5- why a credit card to verify your Apple ID instead of the password you set up?

6- the copyright doesn’t list the owner, just a year. 

Edited by Pato del Muerto
  • Hook 'Em 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Armybrat said:

Thanks for the replies. 
(No,  I did not respond to it. Never would do that)

But I feel really dumb for having to ask in the first place.
Where’s the nearest rest home?

That's the wrong attitude.  Absolutely ask.  Asking just shows good sense.

 

GF's Aunt was a bit of a loner; lived in NYC, did well, never had children.  She died a while back, and we discovered that she had fallen for some bullshit IRS scam to the tune of $25,000. 

 

 

  • Hook 'Em 2
  • Like 1
  • Rage+1 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is some really sophisticated stuff going on out there (Brat's wasn't all that sophisticated) -- but I've seen cites that something like 90%+ of it relates to organized crime.  They don't fuck around.  If it wasn't immensely profitable, they wouldn't do it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, Gil Bang said:

That's the wrong attitude.  Absolutely ask.  Asking just shows good sense.

 

This. Please. For God's sake, better to ask than to become yet another victim.

The only way these child-raping dickhead rotted-cunt shit-eaterswill stop is if they stop making money from their scams. Knowledge is their worst enemy. Asking questions is how you learn.

Please ask. We are more than happy to help you.

Edited by Rimbo
  • Hook 'Em 2
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My older neighbor got got last year. Traced it back to opening a fake ad email for kohls or Walgreens or wherever, but the phish was a pop up supposedly from Microsoft that there was a problem of some sort and to call a phone number. Well she did, and the person on the line said that a routine scan of her computer found some kiddie porn pics or something but they could tell that they were planted. That was to get her flustered. Then they said that they could remove it without contacting the authorities and since someone had obviously been in the computer they should also cancel all their cards- and they would do it for her. Just need to give all the bank and card info. Which she did. 
 

so she came over to our house to tell my wife about this stuff that Microsoft had found, and my wife had to explain to her that she had been scammed and needed to cancel all of her stuff immediately. 

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, DalTxHornFan said:

There is some really sophisticated stuff going on out there (Brat's wasn't all that sophisticated) -- but I've seen cites that something like 90%+ of it relates to organized crime.  They don't fuck around.  If it wasn't immensely profitable, they wouldn't do it.

I heard a story at a CLE event today about a CPA firm that had their invoicing system hacked.  The hackers sent out past-due notices demanding immediate ACH payments for current invoices (The narrator: the CPA firm was not set up to accept ACH payments).  One client was so pissed about it that he sent the ACH payment (to the hackers) and promptly fired the CPA firm for being such dicks about payment terms!  Bad situation all around!

Edited by DalTxHornFan
  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you want to learn a LOT more about scams, I recommend Jim Browning's YouTube channel.

https://www.youtube.com/@JimBrowning

Browning is a Limey who got mad at the scammers scamming a relative of his, so he started making videos to expose them, their methods, and to attempt to draw police attention to them. He's literally called victims in the middle of being scammed to let them know, "Hey, you're getting scammed."

 

If you want to LAUGH at scammers getting their time wasted, I strongly recommend Kitboga.

https://www.youtube.com/@KitbogaShow

Kitboga's show is almost as informative than Jim's, but then has the payoff of him making the scammers very, very angry once it dawns on them that they've spent countless days chasing someone who was never, ever going to give them a dime. He has vocoders to make himself sound like an old lady, fake Bank Of America/Google Play Store websites setup, and scams the scammers right back.

 

Both of these guys have worked with each other, some other YouTubers and international law enforcement to try and educate us (potential victims) and governments about the negative impact these guys have. They also have some very impressive tech to expose and fool the scammers.

If you've never seen the videos, it's worth an hour or two of your life to watch and learn, so that you don't become a victim, too.

12 minutes ago, DalTxHornFan said:

I heard a story at a CLE event today about a CPA firm that had their invoicing system hacked.  The hackers sent out past-due notices demanding immediate ACH payments for current invoices (The narrator: the CPA firm was not set up to accept ACH payments).  One client was so pissed about it that he sent the ACH payment (to the hackers) and promptly fired the CPA firm for being such dicks about payment terms!  Bad situation all around!

CLE = ?

  • Hook 'Em 1
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Rimbo said:

If you want to learn a LOT more about scams, I recommend Jim Browning's YouTube channel.

https://www.youtube.com/@JimBrowning

Browning is a Limey who got mad at the scammers scamming a relative of his, so he started making videos to expose them, their methods, and to attempt to draw police attention to them. He's literally called victims in the middle of being scammed to let them know, "Hey, you're getting scammed."

 

If you want to LAUGH at scammers getting their time wasted, I strongly recommend Kitboga.

https://www.youtube.com/@KitbogaShow

Kitboga's show is almost as informative than Jim's, but then has the payoff of him making the scammers very, very angry once it dawns on them that they've spent countless days chasing someone who was never, ever going to give them a dime. He has vocoders to make himself sound like an old lady, fake Bank Of America/Google Play Store websites setup, and scams the scammers right back.

 

Both of these guys have worked with each other, some other YouTubers and international law enforcement to try and educate us (potential victims) and governments about the negative impact these guys have. They also have some very impressive tech to expose and fool the scammers.

If you've never seen the videos, it's worth an hour or two of your life to watch and learn, so that you don't become a victim, too.

CLE = ?

CLE is the mandatory continuing education for lawyers...some number of hours each year.

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Rimbo said:

If you want to learn a LOT more about scams, I recommend Jim Browning's YouTube channel.

https://www.youtube.com/@JimBrowning

Browning is a Limey who got mad at the scammers scamming a relative of his, so he started making videos to expose them, their methods, and to attempt to draw police attention to them. He's literally called victims in the middle of being scammed to let them know, "Hey, you're getting scammed."

 

If you want to LAUGH at scammers getting their time wasted, I strongly recommend Kitboga.

https://www.youtube.com/@KitbogaShow

Kitboga's show is almost as informative than Jim's, but then has the payoff of him making the scammers very, very angry once it dawns on them that they've spent countless days chasing someone who was never, ever going to give them a dime. He has vocoders to make himself sound like an old lady, fake Bank Of America/Google Play Store websites setup, and scams the scammers right back.

 

Both of these guys have worked with each other, some other YouTubers and international law enforcement to try and educate us (potential victims) and governments about the negative impact these guys have. They also have some very impressive tech to expose and fool the scammers.

If you've never seen the videos, it's worth an hour or two of your life to watch and learn, so that you don't become a victim, too.

CLE = ?

Continuing Legal Education

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My attitude on all of this shit is, "If i really need it, they'll send it again," whether it is a solicitation or otherwise.  Our organization sends out deliberate phishing attempts and I hear co-workers saying they got busted.  Really?

If it doesn't look right from an absolutely established entity, hit the eject button.  I know there are a shit ton of tech-savvy folks in here, but here's some basic indicators or scams:

1. name of sender will be slightly misspelled, such as appple.com

2. contains link for you to access

3. sense of urgency is conveyed.  You must act now!!!

4. doesn't refer to you by name, but rather 'valued customer' or some shit like that

5.  Doesn't list a phone number or other legit way to contact

Basically if it doesn't look 100% right, delete that sucker.

Edited by slorch
Link to comment
Share on other sites

38 minutes ago, slorch said:

My attitude on all of this shit is, "If i really need it, they'll send it again," whether it is a solicitation or otherwise.  Our organization sends out deliberate phishing attempts and I hear co-workers saying they got busted.  Really?

If it doesn't look right from an absolutely established entity, hit the eject button.  I know there are a shit ton of tech-savvy folks in here, but here's some basic indicators or scams:

1. name of sender will be slightly misspelled, such as appple.com

2. contains link for you to access

3. sense of urgency is conveyed.  You must act now!!!

4. doesn't refer to you by name, but rather 'valued customer' or some shit like that

5.  Doesn't list a phone number or other legit way to contact

Basically if it doesn't look 100% right, delete that sucker.

These phishing emails are getting very sophisticated. It can be very hard to tell the real from the fake. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, slorch said:

My attitude on all of this shit is, "If i really need it, they'll send it again," whether it is a solicitation or otherwise.  Our organization sends out deliberate phishing attempts and I hear co-workers saying they got busted.  Really?

If it doesn't look right from an absolutely established entity, hit the eject button.  I know there are a shit ton of tech-savvy folks in here, but here's some basic indicators or scams:

1. name of sender will be slightly misspelled, such as appple.com

2. contains link for you to access

3. sense of urgency is conveyed.  You must act now!!!

4. doesn't refer to you by name, but rather 'valued customer' or some shit like that

5.  Doesn't list a phone number or other legit way to contact

Basically if it doesn't look 100% right, delete that sucker.

Yep. My work got mad when I didn’t respond to something they sent 3 times. I told them if it’s important enough then send it 4 times. I wish they would deactivate my fucking email. All I get are phishing emails from them trying to get me to click on a link which will result in more online training. 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, Kennythetiger said:

I’ve always looked at the return email address of the sender, but even that’s getting tricky now. 

Yep, I got one about my Microsoft account from "no-reply@microsoft.com" and it took me a little bit to figure out if it was real or not. Had to do some googling on that one to find it was a scam.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Rimbo said:

If you want to learn a LOT more about scams, I recommend Jim Browning's YouTube channel.

https://www.youtube.com/@JimBrowning

Browning is a Limey who got mad at the scammers scamming a relative of his, so he started making videos to expose them, their methods, and to attempt to draw police attention to them. He's literally called victims in the middle of being scammed to let them know, "Hey, you're getting scammed."

 

If you want to LAUGH at scammers getting their time wasted, I strongly recommend Kitboga.

https://www.youtube.com/@KitbogaShow

Kitboga's show is almost as informative than Jim's, but then has the payoff of him making the scammers very, very angry once it dawns on them that they've spent countless days chasing someone who was never, ever going to give them a dime. He has vocoders to make himself sound like an old lady, fake Bank Of America/Google Play Store websites setup, and scams the scammers right back.

 

Both of these guys have worked with each other, some other YouTubers and international law enforcement to try and educate us (potential victims) and governments about the negative impact these guys have. They also have some very impressive tech to expose and fool the scammers.

If you've never seen the videos, it's worth an hour or two of your life to watch and learn, so that you don't become a victim, too.

CLE = ?

Don't forget 419 Eater

samuel_eze4.jpg

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, TonyTexas said:

DO NOT click on unsubscribe in spam emails. It’s just as dangerous as opening a link. Just send it to junk and hope your filter weeds out future emails. 

If it's a legitimate company's marketing campaign, you can hit "Unsubscribe." Real actual companies have to provide these links and, on request, have to terminate communications. One of my former employers is shutting down, letting go of thousands of employees, due to losing lawsuits from their failure to respond to "Do Not Call" and "Unsubscribe" requests.

Now, for scams, this is good advice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...