Jump to content
Neonmoon

SpaceX

Recommended Posts

They haven’t been talking about the intercontinental travel part of Starship in a while. I wonder if the changes to the design have shifted that goal? Gwynne Shotwell seemed very confident about that use of Starship in an interview last year.

Edited by Xminus6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/11/2019 at 12:20 AM, Xminus6 said:

They haven’t been talking about the intercontinental travel part of Starship in a while. I wonder if the changes to the design have shifted that goal? Gwynne Shotwell seemed very confident about that use of Starship in an interview last year.

It's probably much further off. The rockets will have the capability for quick hops but making the preparation for space travel routine will be a long way off. And making it economical when there are othe, albeit slower forms of intercontinental travel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/30/2019 at 3:57 AM, Sam Lin said:

Correct. This is just a hopper for dynamics and propulsion studies, will go up up to ~20km and land, for development of launch,  guidance, maneuvering, and landing. This will not go to "space." Note this is already the second iteration and the third is already being built. The speed of private space (or of SpaceX and Musk's mentality, in particular) is just stunning compared to the status quo.

The comment above about SLS being years obsolete by the time it gets off the ground is likely prescient. Everyone thought Falcon and reusable rocketry was a dumb fool's pipe dream under 10yr ago, and now entire rocket programs have shut down due to not being able to compete, and people don't even bother to watch the launch and landings any more. This generation is living a second Space Age, and it's amazing.

You wonder at what point SLS should be abandoned and the money just given in a massive contract to SpaceX for interplanetary travel. Wed get to Mars 10 times faster that way, imo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly? 5yr ago. You aren't wrong, SpaceX would get us there faster, cheaper, and more efficiently. But politics will ensure SLS continues to be a bottomless pit of funding and will fly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/12/2019 at 9:48 PM, Sam Lin said:

Honestly? 5yr ago. You aren't wrong, SpaceX would get us there faster, cheaper, and more efficiently. But politics will ensure SLS continues to be a bottomless pit of funding and will fly.

 

If they closed down SLS, where would they hide money to funnel to the shadow government?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SpaceX launch scheduled for Nov11. Notable for 2 things - this will be the first time a Falcon booster is reused 4 times, and this will fly with a previously-flown and recovered payload fairing. It says a lot about how much SpaceX has changed the "norm" of space operations that neither of these items is making many headlines.

Payload is another stack of Starlink internet satellites, SpaceX internal cargo, which makes it easier for them to take the reuse risks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Gil Bang said:

It says December 17.

On Monday, December 16 at 7:10 p.m. EST, SpaceX launched JCSAT-18/Kacific1 from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. The satellite was deployed approximately 33 minutes after liftoff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, MrPhlegm said:

meanwhile starliner just got launched

 

f7475b9e3750cbc2799bd994a304c33d.jpg2e8f63178c7fa285066fd13dd031b7fb.jpg5085d95a65ddb80cf482a4caa4855fa3.jpg87d0948c0e9b7bd4216a7651dddc70a3.jpg36f085f0710c527ccf7c19ea4b360bee.jpgc3d08d1284f13a1106fde1e0585c767f.jpgbe083f115cb581d47f41f251c1633b34.jpg889f3d6918edfc1e8e3f84475ec68d90.jpgd10e84e95e73c5e803c2d661decbf049.jpgb1b427c636e24f432c0cc651f3e27cf5.jpg10df0a507b51223afca502880fff3229.jpg823395996c5f2eca4f7d5444dfd016f2.jpg

 

pics taken from my driveway

 

 

Sort of. It didn’t reach the correct orbit & now can’t dock with the space station:

https://www.space.com/boeing-starliner-oft-fails-to-reach-correct-orbit.html
 

Quote

Boeing's Starliner Won't Reach Space Station, NASA Chief Says

By Chelsea Gohd 2 hours ago

Updated: CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Boeing's Starliner astronaut taxi suffered an anomaly today (Dec. 20) during its flight to the International Space Station during the Orbital Flight Test (OFT) mission. 

About 90 minutes after blastoff, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said on Twitter that the capsule will not be able to reach the space station because it burned too much fuel during the anomaly.

The Atlas V rocket from United Launch Alliance successfully launched from Space Launch Complex 41 here at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 6:36 a.m. EST (1136 GMT) as planned. But, as of about an hour after launch, the mission team had announced an anomaly with the uncrewed capsule's orbit.

"Starliner in stable orbit. The burn needed for a rendezvous with the ISS did not happen. Working the issue," Bridenstine tweeted,following the announcement of the anomaly.

"We have since experienced an off-nominal insertion and the spacecraft is in a stable position," Boeing spokesperson Steve Siceloff said during a launch broadcast. "It's fully powered; mission control here in Houston is assessing all the options."

Blastoff! Boeing's Starliner Crew Capsule Launches to Space Station

"After launching successfully at 6:36 a.m. Eastern Time Friday on the United Launch Alliance Atlas v rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the Boeing Starliner space vehicle experienced an off-nominal insertion," Boeing spokesperson Kelly Kaplan told reporters here at the press site. 

"The spacecraft is currently in safe, stable configuration," Kaplan added. "Flight controllers have completed a successful initial burn and are assessing next steps. Boeing and NASA are working together to review options for the test and mission opportunities available while the Starliner remains in orbit. A joint news conference will be held at 9 a.m. Eastern on NASA TV."

A view of the Starliner mission control room from the live webcast on NASA TV. (Image credit: NASA TV)

The OFT was designed as a critical milestone to test Starliner for future crewed missions. Following this procedure, Boeing plans to launch a Crewed Flight Test with three astronauts onboard Starliner.

NASA hired both Boeing and SpaceX to develop reusable vehicles capable of bringing humans safely to and from the space station. Ever since the 2011 retirement of the space shuttle, the agency has been relying on Russian Soyuz spacecraft for access to the orbiting laboratory.

Prior to today's launch, both Boeing and SpaceX were targeting crewed test flights in 2020.

Awesome pics though!

Edited by smokebomb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark your calendars for January 18th:

https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/nasa-spacex-rocket-emergency-test-falcon-9-crew-dragon-explosion-a9278196.html

 

Quote

NASA AND SPACEX TO BLOW UP ROCKET IN THE AIR AS PART OF EMERGENCY TEST

Critical test will ensure astronauts can escape in case of a disaster

Andrew Griffin

5 hours ago 

Nasa and SpaceX are set to destroy a rocket as part of an emergency test.

The procedure, known as an "In-Flight Abort Test", will ensure that a new capsule meant for carrying astronauts would allow them to escape in the case of a disastrous launch.

But it will also mean destroying one of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rockets to understand what would happen if one really exploded by accident.

The two organisations are looking to run the test on 18 January, from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The demonstration of the escape system is one of the final tests required before astronauts travel in the new spacecraft, known as Crew Dragon, which will one day carry people into space.

During the test, the Crew Dragon capsule will be attached to a Falcon 9 rocket, as it will be when it is used as part of real launch.

But shortly after liftoff, SpaceX will trigger a launch escape that should demonstrate that the Crew Dragon is able to safely separate from the rocket and carry those inside of it back down to Earth. After it detaches from the rocket, it will use its parachutes to fall safely to the ground and be collected.

But the rocket is expected to undergo what SpaceX refers to as "rapid unscheduled disassembly", or an explosion. It will be destroyed and SpaceX has said that it will pick the parts out of the Atlantic Ocean when the test is over.

Nasa and SpaceX will then use the data generated as part of the test to evaluate whether the new spacecraft can be certified to carry astronauts to and from the International Space Station.

The launch had initially been planned for earlier but Nasa announced it would be delayed to no earlier than 18 January, giving more time for "spacecraft processing", it said earlier this week.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it just me or does NASA celebrate any SLS/Boeing milestone while acting like an annoyed child when talking about Space X?    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...