Jump to content
thunderlounge

So I got a WSM...

Recommended Posts

Going to repost this.  This is from last week.

_HQoiDOSOVlZGTU0sl7xbsuAzn7QkbwgAc-8DxV_

Edited by dcbc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed the WSM thread from GM disappeared last night. I wondered if there may be designs or the ability to somehow import threads from the old place? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no idea. Also no idea why that thread got nuked. Took me a minute to noticed it was actually gone completely, as I was going to restart this thread with the opening post of that one.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure what's going on with my picture above, but since we don't have a lot at the moment, I'm going to repost because brisket.

SubyFK1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Smoking a 14# brisket tonight for dinner tomorrow. I’ve always placed it fatcap up with pretty good results. The wife & guests have loved every one, but I think I hold myself to too high a standard. Reading (Meathead & few Weber cookbooks) that fatside down protects the flat better. How do y’all smoke ‘em?

Pron will follow. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/25/2018 at 3:38 PM, Baboontyme said:

I noticed the WSM thread from GM disappeared last night. I wondered if there may be designs or the ability to somehow import threads from the old place? 

That’s a shame. That thing had so much useful info

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, sitting in my freezer, I have a small (13 Lb.) turkey I bought back in November to take advantage of post-Thanksgiving sales, and I'm thinking I'd like to try smoking this thing soon.  I recall the old WSM thread on Shaggy had some threads about how to do this.  Unfortunately that all got nuked in the handover to the new site, so I'd appreciate some pointers on smoking a turkey on a WSM,  specifically brine recipes,, what kind of wood chunks work best with poultry, rub recipes, cooker temps, meat temps, etc. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, 83Horn said:

So, sitting in my freezer, I have a small (13 Lb.) turkey I bought back in November to take advantage of post-Thanksgiving sales, and I'm thinking I'd like to try smoking this thing soon.  I recall the old WSM thread on Shaggy had some threads about how to do this.  Unfortunately that all got nuked in the handover to the new site, so I'd appreciate some pointers on smoking a turkey on a WSM,  specifically brine recipes,, what kind of wood chunks work best with poultry, rub recipes, cooker temps, meat temps, etc. Thanks.

I have done a couple.  What I have learned is that bird bark is weird.  Mine looked burnt to a crisp, but were tender as hell.  You can brine it (search for the Franklin BBQ video where he talks about the brining solution).  But if it's a butterball or the like, it's been injected with a pretty good amount of solution already.  I cut up a few oranges and stuffed them in the cavity for good measure.  No water in a foiled pan in the WSM.  Thermometer in the thick part of the thigh.  I ran around 300 F.  Pull at 165.  Put it in a pan, cover it with butter and foil.  Warm oven for about 15 minutes to melt the butter. 

I winged it (no pun) and it turned out really well, but didn't look like a Norman Rockwell painting by any stretch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^That's a pretty good summary. I don't use a foiled pan when I've done mine on a WSM. I just watch for color in the breastesses and thigh and cover with foil when they start getting dark. I have also used a wet/moist cheesecloth to cover the tits with good results. 

hullabrine has always worked out well. Hopefully he'll repost it on surly. 

Wood I always use fruit - mostly apple. Agree with high temps - 300+ to avoid rubbery skin. Sometimes I do buttery and rosemary under the skin and stuff the cavity with aromatics - garlic, onions, celery, citrus, etc. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are a couple of tricks to keep the turkey skin from looking blackened.  I think some people will put cheesecloth on the bird at a certain temperature. I found that if I give it a very light coating of oil before putting it on the smoker then the bird only gets to a dark brown that looks really good.

Basically I think if you're smoking it at the right temp (300, not low and slow 225) then it should finish before it gets that unappealing look. But as stated above even if it looks burned, the meat will be delicious, especially if you brined it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Baboontyme said:

^That's a pretty good summary. I don't use a foiled pan when I've done mine on a WSM. I just watch for color in the breastesses and thigh and cover with foil when they start getting dark. I have also used a wet/moist cheesecloth to cover the tits with good results. 

hullabrine has always worked out well. Hopefully he'll repost it on surly. 

Wood I always use fruit - mostly apple. Agree with high temps - 300+ to avoid rubbery skin. Sometimes I do buttery and rosemary under the skin and stuff the cavity with aromatics - garlic, onions, celery, citrus, etc. 

I just do the foiled pan at the end to get the butter to melt and collect around the bird.  Never while smoking it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Champ how long you let your pork ribs rest before serving? I'm doing a mini test run with my theory. I'm about to pull them and pop them in a ~ 120 degree oven for a couple of hours. They are reading anywhere between 203 and 209....pretty much probe tender. I'm going to give them another 15. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Temps have dropped to 172 in the meat, oven temp sitting at 140. Trying to get oven temp down a bit. Currently wrapped in butcher paper. My plan is to let these rest for another 2-2.5 hours. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been trying to decide whethet to get a WSW, or a pellet grill/smoker. I already have a nice gas grill, so leaning toward the WSM. Any thoughts on this? Also what is the best size on the WSM? Is it worth the extra $100 for the 22"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In terms of Traeger/pellet vs. WSM it depends on how truly lazy you are. The WSM isn't much work at all, but it's some. You actually have to put charcoal and wood chunks and light a fire. And maybe add water to the bowl if you're so inclined. But it is outstanding and will hold temps for 14 hours or so with little to no maintenance, just like a Traeger. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been trying to decide whethet to get a WSW, or a pellet grill/smoker. I already have a nice gas grill, so leaning toward the WSM. Any thoughts on this? Also what is the best size on the WSM? Is it worth the extra $100 for the 22"?


How many people are you serving at a time or how many different meats do you want to smoke at a time? I have the 18.5 WSM and have almost never used the second, lower grill. On the top grill alone I can get a good size brisket or 3 racks of pork ribs (or 2 pork ribs plus a turkey) or 2 beef ribs, etc so it’s been big enough for me if I’m entertaining cooking for up to 6 or so adults (w/ the kiddos maybe partaking but we usually just make them hotdogs or burgers or whatever). Point being I haven’t really missed having the 22 in my circumstance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, this is what I was looking for. I just didn't want to have buyer's remorse on the 18". I hate buying anything undersized and wishing I would have gone bigger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Counter point...

The 22 gives you more room to maneuver.  It’s not just the cooking space, it’s space to run probes, add coals, spray meat, add water, check temps, etc.  For a measly $100...I’m 22” all the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Landomatic said:

Counter point...

The 22 gives you more room to maneuver.  It’s not just the cooking space, it’s space to run probes, add coals, spray meat, add water, check temps, etc.  For a measly $100...I’m 22” all the way.

Go with the 22.  Later on down the road as you start to expand what you are preparing, you'll be glad you did.  Same remorse all the ceramic eggs go through getting a large vs. XL.  Most wish they'd ponied up the extra and gotten the larger size.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Timely discussion as I was headed to buy a 22" one this morning.  I went to Academy yesterday with my heart set on getting one of the Old Country vertical smokers and it's just too damn big for my needs. The next step down in size is the WSM 22" that is still more than I need for the family but won't limit me if I need to go bigger...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I have an egg (Kamodo).  But it's damn heavy.  I'd love to get a WSM just for the sake that you can get it in the back of a truck, tailgate, ranch trips, etc.  And they are so simple to use.  Just get a dual-probe digital thermometer with whatever you buy.  They are game changers.  

*and I love the fact that you can load more fuel into them while they are smoking vs. the eggs you have to take off the grate/plate setter, etc.  Giant PITA is you wanted to add a few blocks of wood, etc.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the small one (maybe it was a Brinkmann rather than a Weber) 10+ years ago but ditched it when I moved overseas (and upgraded to a Bradley).  Had to cut the brisket to get it to fit in both which is why I want something wider.  The Bradley has served me well but it's a pain to clean so won't be upgrading to a wider one of those and will be retiring it and selling it when I get the WSM...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those that have/have used both sizes, doesn’t the 22 require more fuel? If so and one is smoking smaller amounts at a time (like I am), it seems like a 22 would be kind of overkill and a little wasteful from a charcoal perspective.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, mdleast said:

For those that have/have used both sizes, doesn’t the 22 require more fuel? If so and one is smoking smaller amounts at a time (like I am), it seems like a 22 would be kind of overkill and a little wasteful from a charcoal perspective.

4 inches equates to what, like an extra 1/30th of a bag per use?  Plus, charcoal is cheap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Baboontyme said:

Temps have dropped to 172 in the meat, oven temp sitting at 140. Trying to get oven temp down a bit. Currently wrapped in butcher paper. My plan is to let these rest for another 2-2.5 hours. 

The ribs were good. They had a good bite to them. But they were not life altering good. I would have thought that the prolonged rest (about 2.5 hours) would have made them more moist and tender but it was not so. I'll try again. 

40371858485_7f9977863b_z.jpg

26396175867_ccb7c2ab3b.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the purpose of this test?  Pork ribs seem to cook the most consistently, I don't remember ever smoking pork ribs and thinking to myself I wish these were more moist and tender.

Edited by TornACL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, TornACL said:

What's the purpose of this test?  Pork ribs seem to cook the most consistently, I don't remember ever smoking pork ribs and thinking to myself I wish these were more moist and tender.

See the brisket thread. Trying to replicate method I suspect some of the top BBQ joints use but didn't have time to run a full brisket so I thought I'd try it with ribs. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Landomatic said:

4 inches equates to what, like an extra 1/30th of a bag per use?  Plus, charcoal is cheap.

I’m not sure where you learned math, or didn’t actually, but the increase in area from the 18 to the 22 is about 50%. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I managed to melt the door handle on my WSM.  I cooked a couple of briskets for Easter lunch and cut it too close to the time we needed to leave for church.  In my hurry to pull them off  I left the lid off with fuel still in the fire bowl.  When I got back from church the handle had burned off the door from the inside.

I ordered the Cajun Bandit replacement door with latch.  Will report back with results.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Red Sundance said:

I’m not sure where you learned math, or didn’t actually, but the increase in area from the 18 to the 22 is about 50%. 

First off, I was told there would be no math.  Admittedly, I’ve never cooked on an 18.  But there’s no way in hell a 4 inch bigger charcoal ring takes 50% more charcoal.  Either way, I think the added space is worth the extra fuel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, harold said:

I managed to melt the door handle on my WSM.  I cooked a couple of briskets for Easter lunch and cut it too close to the time we needed to leave for church.  In my hurry to pull them off  I left the lid off with fuel still in the fire bowl.  When I got back from church the handle had burned off the door from the inside.

I ordered the Cajun Bandit replacement door with latch.  Will report back with results.

Removed two big heat sinks and increased the airflow to maximum. Yep, that'll get pretty hot. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got a Maverick wireless setup that has probes for ambient and meat.  It works fine, but the range is limited. 

Anyone have experience with this.  Could I put one of the probes in the ambient probe clip to measure cooker temp (I know one review says "no," but I don't see why it wouldn't work.

https://www.amazon.com/Wireless-Thermometer-OUTAD-Digital-Controlled/dp/B07897XBLH/ref=sr_1_29_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1523057253&sr=8-29-spons&keywords=remote%2Bbbq%2Bthermometer%2Bwifi&smid=AE26KL49X8248&th=1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Landomatic said:

First off, I was told there would be no math.  Admittedly, I’ve never cooked on an 18.  But there’s no way in hell a 4 inch bigger charcoal ring takes 50% more charcoal.  Either way, I think the added space is worth the extra fuel.

4 inches is not just 4 inches in regards to volume . It’s not 50% more charcoal but it’s closer to that than 1/30th. Either way, yes charcoal is cheap and shouldn’t be a deciding factor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/30/2018 at 7:36 PM, mdleast said:

I love beef ribs. So tasty, so decadent.

debac603407475cfde03976828ec2ced.jpg

15bf7984dfc66951e26218ce32ef3102.jpg

adf12ef08d160a6a8fc035f2bb736972.jpg

 

 

those look amazing.  How do you cook those?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, AngryBevo said:

those look amazing.  How do you cook those?

Umm, I'm guessing he smoked them in his WSM.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, PantsTent said:

Umm, I'm guessing he smoked them in his WSM.

 

Yeah no shit.  But i've only done pork with the 3-2-1 method I got on shaggy.  Not sure if that applies to beef ribs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, dcbc said:

I've got a Maverick wireless setup that has probes for ambient and meat.  It works fine, but the range is limited. 

Anyone have experience with this.  Could I put one of the probes in the ambient probe clip to measure cooker temp (I know one review says "no," but I don't see why it wouldn't work.

https://www.amazon.com/Wireless-Thermometer-OUTAD-Digital-Controlled/dp/B07897XBLH/ref=sr_1_29_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1523057253&sr=8-29-spons&keywords=remote%2Bbbq%2Bthermometer%2Bwifi&smid=AE26KL49X8248&th=1

Get the thermoworks "smoke"  I went through a few mavericks and the smoke is so much better

 

https://www.thermoworks.com/Smoke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out the Virtual Weber Bullet recipe for Beef Chuck Short RIbs.  I essentially always do a hybrid of the Franklin recipe (for the rub/prep) and the WVB recipe (to determine amount of charcoal, water, etc for a WSM 18.5...as Franklin uses an offset in his recipes).  Franklin rub (half salt/half pepper). Follow the WVB for charcoal and no water and, roughly 6 hours later, they were done (4.74 lb rib pre-trimming of fat).  I will say that the WVB recipe calls for it to be pulled when the meat is probing (on average throughout) around 200 but as I recall Champ on here recommending to wait longer to render more,  I think I actually pulled these more in the 207-210 range.They were quite tasty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...