Jump to content
Mac8111

Big Green Egg & Other Ceramic Grills All Encompassing Thread

Recommended Posts

FUCK




ME




ffdc7817e5e69167a02e06c928c817e5.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Damn dude that sucks. Same thing happened to me years ago but the dome didn’t break, only the temp gauge.

7217960cd4969af50e776171be22d8a9.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Buzzrock said:

Damn dude that sucks. Same thing happened to me years ago but the dome didn’t break, only the temp gauge.

Well, grass is a bit softer than concrete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, grass is a bit softer than concrete.


39ef9d9af9532bfba8489cf866805ea0.jpg

Point is, the bands can heat up and expand in rare instances, just something to be aware of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made a pizza last night in the Primo. I don't prefer it honestly. I don't like the charcoal smoke taste. It looked good, though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might need to let the fire burn a little longer. The smoke taste should be minimal with a clean burning fire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On pizzas, my egg gets so hot that it starts to burn (way more than just a little char, which I like) the bottom of the crust before the top of the crust gets brown and bubbly.  Not sure how to fix it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/2/2020 at 2:01 PM, Mac8111 said:

FUCK




ME




ffdc7817e5e69167a02e06c928c817e5.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Happened to me last year...FYI, contact your local place, they might replace it.  I got new dome, bands, etc fo' free.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On pizzas, my egg gets so hot that it starts to burn (way more than just a little char, which I like) the bottom of the crust before the top of the crust gets brown and bubbly.  Not sure how to fix it.
Thinner crust, or turn the heat down a bit. I like to do my pizzas at 500 or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On pizzas, my egg gets so hot that it starts to burn (way more than just a little char, which I like) the bottom of the crust before the top of the crust gets brown and bubbly.  Not sure how to fix it.


Are you using a pizza stone or just throwing them on direct?

You can get an unglazed ceramic tile from the store for about a buck, makes a fine pizza stone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On pizzas, my egg gets so hot that it starts to burn (way more than just a little char, which I like) the bottom of the crust before the top of the crust gets brown and bubbly.  Not sure how to fix it.

Use the plate setter and a pizza stone on top. If it’s still too hot, put the stone on the grill above the plate setter with a gap in between.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On pizzas, my egg gets so hot that it starts to burn (way more than just a little char, which I like) the bottom of the crust before the top of the crust gets brown and bubbly.  Not sure how to fix it.

Use the plate setter and a pizza stone on top. If it’s still too hot, put the stone on the grill above the plate setter with a gap in between.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was only using the plate setter--which was advertised as a pizza stone as well.  I'll trying using a pizza stone on top of the plate setter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, HouTex said:

I was only using the plate setter--which was advertised as a pizza stone as well.  I'll trying using a pizza stone on top of the plate setter.

Definitely.  I assumed you were doing this.  Grill grate between the two gives you a little buffer as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen people use copper pipe fittings (T or elbow) as spacers between heat deflector and the pizza stone.  Otherwise the stone gets too hot and the crust gets done faster than the top.  Traditional brick ovens do not have the fire below the bricks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

See my comments earlier in thread about using multiple layers of heat deflectors/pizza stones with spacers in between, as a way to buffer the heat from below. Balancing the heat from below and the heat from above is the key to pizza in a kamado.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Sam Lin said:

See my comments earlier in thread about using multiple layers of heat deflectors/pizza stones with spacers in between, as a way to buffer the heat from below. Balancing the heat from below and the heat from above is the key to pizza in a kamado.

Yep. I use a couple of bricks under the pizza stone on mine. Pizza stone right on the grate gets too hot. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was doing my Pizzas this last round (before I broke my lid), I started at 500-600 degrees and it was scorching the bottom way too quick. I hit my sweet spot around 400. That was with the pizza stone on the grate.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone use their ceramic frequently for fast, hot cooks? I throw burgers on a propane grill next to my primo virtually every day. Problem with using the primo for that is lighting and heating up is a lot more time and effort, plus the expense of the fire starter. Is a propane torch the solution Im looking for, or is it still going to be too much effort for daily use? Do you think it would make the burgers notably better?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"better"? I don't know man that's up to your tastes. 

I do think cooking on the ceramic is more fun and I do often fire it up for grilling. I use a weedburner that I bought for my offset. It treats me well. I can get it up to 500 degrees just as fast if not faster than my 6 burner propane grill with the lid shut. 

https://www.amazon.com/Bernzomatic-19425-JT850-Self-Igniting-Outdoor/dp/B00008ZA0F

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Lurch said:

Does anyone use their ceramic frequently for fast, hot cooks? I throw burgers on a propane grill next to my primo virtually every day. Problem with using the primo for that is lighting and heating up is a lot more time and effort, plus the expense of the fire starter. Is a propane torch the solution Im looking for, or is it still going to be too much effort for daily use? Do you think it would make the burgers notably better?

LooftLighter or heat gun FTW.
I use the egg all the time for fast cooks.  I can get mine up to temp in about 10 minutes.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, BigDHornfan said:

LooftLighter  

Yep. Got one for Christmas a few years back and it's been great. Lights charcoal in about 1 minute.  $80 on Amazon. There are knockoff brands for $50. They're so similar, I'm gonna guess it's the Chinese manufacturing plant selling the exact same thing under their own label.

https://www.amazon.com/Looftlighter-Original-Electric-Starter-Charcoal/dp/B000WYY65Y/

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, CooterBrown said:

Yep. Got one for Christmas a few years back and it's been great. Lights charcoal in about 1 minute.  $80 on Amazon. There are knockoff brands for $50. They're so similar, I'm gonna guess it's the Chinese manufacturing plant selling the exact same thing under their own label.

https://www.amazon.com/Looftlighter-Original-Electric-Starter-Charcoal/dp/B000WYY65Y/

 

A heat gun from Harbor Freight for $18 is what I use.  Saw a video of a guy testing looflighter v heat gun.  And heat gun was better.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a map gas torch. Hit the coals for maybe 20 seconds in a couple spots. Go in and do prep on whatever I'm going to cook and grill is up to temp. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had only my BGE for many years. No gas grill. Once you get used to lighting the egg before you do any prep it’s fine.

People love the Looftilighter but I’m partial the cheap plug-in electric coil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most important thing I learned about using the kamado for slow and low cooking was not to rush the fire.  Now I use one tumbleweed lighter and give myself and hour to get the fire steady at my cooking temp. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It may be coincidence, but I used to light the coals in my Vision Grill with the vents wide open as per the Youtube instructional videos commanded. The coals would then get so hot the temps would need to be brought way down which took forever and burned up a good portion of coals before I could even throw the meat on. 

I started lighting them with the vents set to the temp range I was planning on cooking at (I.E. top and bottom vents 1/8" open for low and slow 220-250 range) and have had a much easier time getting the temps where it should be right away. Again, I'm not sure if there is any correlation but it seems to work way better. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What’s your brisket probe-like-butter process? Mine is to keep probing different spots until I find a tough one, then leave the probe there for 20 mins and try again. I’m on my third spot and I’m a bit concerned about all of those good spots I hit the first time an hour ago. Am I risking overcooking one spot just to get the very last spot perfect?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used the cotton ball start this time and it was perfect. I stacked a few pieces of lump in the bottom left corner near vent and dropped two balls I had just briefly soaked w 70* rubbing alcohol between them. The lit immediately and put out a pure blue flame for at least ten minutes. Since I was going low and slow, I didn’t put any more lump around them and just let that come up to temp. I then placed some wood chunks around and on the fire then buried them all w more lump. Seemed to work quite well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Big changes this time around we’re the quality post oak wood chunk placements and large water pan between shields and grates.

Wrapped in butcher paper around 5 hours in. Took another 9 to reach temp. Wrapped towel around same paper, placed on pan and set in oven for two hour rest.

All went well except for wife preheating oven for sides without checking inside first. Lost a towel but brisket survived unscathed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...