Jump to content
Napoleon

USMNT 2020

Recommended Posts

19 hours ago, Hagbard Celine said:

Jay Berhalter, who has had a huge influence on shaping American soccer over the last two decades, is leaving U.S. Soccer.

Berhalter, the older brother of U.S. men's national team coach Gregg Berhalter, advised U.S. Soccer senior staff he plans on stepping down from his position as chief commercial and strategy officer at the federation at the end of February.

On Tuesday, SI.com's Grant Wahl reported that Berhalter was not a candidate for the U.S. Soccer CEO position vacant since longtime CEO Dan Flynn stepped down last September. It was first reported in the Washington Post in October 2018 that Flynn planned to step down but a search firm had first been retained to work on the CEO succession in November 2017.

It once appeared Berhalter, Flynn's pick for the job, would be the new CEO, but U.S. Soccer president Carlos Cordeiro said he halted the CEO job search in May because he was not satisfied with the short list of candidates. A new search firm came on board in September. An updated list of finalists for the CEO position -- interviewed for the first time in December  -- included men and women, and one person from outside the United States.

In June 2019, the federation was rocked by the publication of scathing postings by a small group of current and former federation employees about a "toxic" work environment at U.S. Soccer. The New York Times categorized reviewers as having "open disdain for Flynn and Berhalter." In December, Cordeiro dismissed the notion that the federation's working environment was "toxic" but he did say the Glassdoor reviews were a wake-up call.

Cordeiro's characterization of the reviews came after a presentation to U.S. Soccer's board of directors on Dec. 6 during which a good portion of the three-hour session was spent addressing workplace issues. It followed an engagement survey on workplace conditions -- a direct result of the Glassdoor reviews -- conducted by the Leadership Research Institute and "some pretty telling stories came out of this," said Cordeiro.

Berhalter, who has always played a very hands-on role in U.S. Soccer affairs, became a lightning rod as the uncertainty surrounding the CEO succession drew on. The publication of the Glassdoor reviews followed rumors at U.S. Soccer House that Berhalter would be named to the CEO position.

U.S. Soccer has been mired in litigation related to a host of issues, notably gender discrimination claims filed by members of the U.S. women's national team about how they have been compensated and the support they received during the tenure of Flynn and Berhalter.

Berhalter, 48, was on the committee that selected Earnie Stewart as the first U.S. men's national team general manager, and that drew considerable scrutiny when Stewart, now U.S. Soccer's sporting director, selected Gregg Berhalter to the fill the men's national team coaching position vacant for more than 13 months after the USA was eliminated from the 2018 World Cup and Bruce Arena stepped down.

Cosmos Country. The Berhalters are a product of the soccer boom of the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing up in the shadows of the Cosmos in Tenafly, New Jersey.

''We watched the Cosmos at Giants Stadium and Italian League highlights on Sunday morning on RAI,'' Jay Berhalter told Soccer America in a 2006 interview, ''and my brother and I played every day in any weather. New Jersey was an incredible place to experience the game and learn about many different styles of play because you had so many different backgrounds on the field at one time -- players who were from South America, Central America, Europe, Africa all had different ideas about the game, but ultimately had to play as a team. If you look at the players who have come from our area, it's pretty remarkable.''

Jay Berhalter played for the Union Lancers, one of the most successful youth teams ever assembled in the country, and later attended Notre Dame. He learned his soccer from legendary coach Manfred Schellscheidt and Schellscheidt's assistant, Bob Bradley, but said he ''had a rather disappointing career at Notre Dame.'' (Gregg, on the other hand, was selected to two World Cup teams and spent 15 seasons in European pro soccer and three more  in MLS with the LA Galaxy.)

Berhalter started out his career in soccer management as a volunteer with the 1994 World Cup organizing committee.

''I started as a volunteer and several months later was hired in transportation,'' he said. ''Because the business infrastructure in the sport was just starting to develop at the time, many of us got the opportunity to experience multiple aspects of the event and learn about overall event management in a very hands-on manner. Each day was really a chance to learn and to apply that towards managing a process to help the event succeed.''

After the launch of MLS, Berhalter joined the MetroStars, where he worked under Charlie Stillitano, the general manager, until moving to the U.S. Soccer Foundation in 1998. He joined U.S. Soccer in 2000 as chief operating officer when Flynn left the Foundation to become U.S. Soccer's CEO and general secretary.

Except for a five-year break when he worked at Kentaro Group, a now-defunct Swiss-headquartered company that handled media rights for many soccer federations -- including global rights for U.S. Soccer -- and also organized all friendly matches of the Brazil national team, Berhalter has worked at U.S. Soccer for the last two decades, holding such titles as chief operating officer and deputy executive director.

(Another longtime U.S. Soccer executive, Brian Remedi, holds the interim title of chief administrative officer, serving as the top-ranked executive since Flynn's departure in September.)

Berhalter's most recent title was chief commercial and strategy officer. While he worked on the business side, he had decades of experience with the workings on the soccer side, which contributed to his out-sized influence at the federation. Berhalter spearheaded the creation of the Boys’ Development Academy, which launched in 2007, and has overseen the federation's management of the NWSL, which launched in 2013.

No one with the possible exception of former U.S. Soccer president Sunil Gulati can rattle off the names of players that came through the U.S. national team programs, from youth to senior teams, for the last 35 years like Berhalter.

"Jay has a unique skill set," Gulati told Soccer America on Thursday, "that has been tremendously critical to U.S. Soccer on a number of initiatives and events, including the 2003 Women's World Cup and 2016 Copa America Centenario, which were organized in a very short time frame."

Berhalter played a key role as chief operating officer of the organizing committee when U.S. Soccer organized the 2003 Women's World Cup after China was forced to withdraw as host because of the SARS scare. The 2003 tournament didn't enjoy the critical acclaim that the 1999 Women's World Cup did -- for one thing, it didn't have the same happy ending -- but Berhalter and other staffers earned considerable respect for pulling it off with a lead time of less than four months.

The organization of another major tournament fell into the hands of U.S. Soccer in 2015 when the Copa Centenario, scheduled to be played in 2016, was thrown into chaos following the arrests of multiple Concacaf and Conmebol soccer leaders and marketing agents, who conspired to take millions of dollars in bribes as part of a widespread criminal enterprise involving international soccer events.

Berhalter served as CEO of the 2016 Copa Centenario. U.S. Soccer earned a $75 million windfall from the organization of the tournament. Its net assets doubled in a span of three years, from $83 million in 2015 to almost $167 million in 2018, in large part because of distributions from the tournament Berhalter organized. Those assets are now being spent down as U.S. Soccer is projecting deficits as high as $30 million a year over the next three years as its spending has grown to more than $140 million a year from less than $35 million in 2005.

“Having been involved in the sport since the 1994 World Cup and the start of Major League Soccer, working towards the mission of making soccer the preeminent sport in the U.S. has been a fantastic opportunity throughout my career,” said Berhalter in a prepared statement. “I am fortunate to have worked with so many passionate teammates and proud of what we have been able to accomplish together at all levels of the game. My decision to leave U.S. Soccer was not an easy one to make, but it’s the right one for my family and me at this time. Looking to the future, it is exciting to imagine the opportunities that lie ahead.”

Berhalter has certainly been a controversial figure at U.S. Soccer but above all his institutional knowledge will certainly be missed at a critical juncture for the federation that still remains with a CEO.

I was full on WHAT THE FUCK?!?

When we could have had Tata Martinez and let him go to México and felt that we couldn't fire Berhalter fast enough, but also felt that we were doomed.

Then drove down to Austin this week and listened to the PRE Costa Rica podcast and the POST CR match podcast from "Total Soccer Show" (both recorded before the news dropped that Jay Berhalter was stepping down) and I wasn't as down on Gregg as I had been.

In the podcast they discussed that there was a total synergy between the USMNT the US U-23 Olympic coach/squad and the U-20 coach/squad. For the first time there was a style of play that was uniform. They also were asking "What do you think would Gregg consider 'a success' from the match?"

They mentioned that with a friendly like this, they didn't really care about winning, thought it would be nice.
-They wanted to see young players play.
-They wanted to see who understood the system and where they should go with the ball without thinking.
-Which tactics would be employed...

In the POST match podcast, they two hosts seemed to be pretty pleased with what they saw. They were pleasantly surprised with the number of minutes that younger players received, they were happy that Jesus F arrived in the nick of time and played smart balls to teammates. They like most of what they saw in Uly, but saw significant room for improvement, but basically didn't have much critical to say about Gregg.

I'm wondering how short Gregg's leash is at this time. I know that I definitely want synergy in the US Soccer system. Don't know if Gregg's style is the right one, but to not have synergy is just nuts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From ESPN...

State of the USMNT: Assessing the U.S. on talent identification, player development and tactical evolution

r661311_1296x518_5-2.jpg&w=628&h=251&sca

It's been more than two years since the U.S. men's national team failed to qualify for the 2018 World Cup. It's been little more than a year since Gregg Berhalter took charge of the national team for the first time. The Americans' first crack at redemption will come this fall, when they begin qualifying for the 2022 World Cup.

Post Game wrap-uphttp://www.espn.com/video/clip?id=4045638

So with the failures of the 2018 cycle in the past and the hope of the 2022 cycle still on the horizon, where does the U.S. stand? Jeff Carlisle and Noah Davis answer that question by chronicling the state of the U.S. men's national team in four key areas as the Americans prepare to start on the path toward Qatar.

 

Is the player pool improving?

A thought experiment: How would the U.S. starting lineup fare against past editions? While there's no way to know for sure, using EA Sports' FIFA ratings can offer a bit of insight. Without further ado:

Today's starting XI: Zack Steffen (77); DeAndre Yedlin (76), John Brooks (79), Aaron Long (75), Tim Ream (72); Tyler Adams (76), Weston McKennie (81); Jordan Morris (78), Sebastian Lletget (71), Christian Pulisic (82); Jozy Altidore (76). Average rating: 77.

Starting XI vs. Ghana (June 16, 2014): Tim Howard (84); Fabian Johnson (73), Geoff Cameron (74), Matt Besler (69), DaMarcus Beasley(69); Alejandro Bedoya (72), Kyle Beckerman (74), Michael Bradley (81), Jermaine Jones (77); Jozy Altidore (77), Clint Dempsey (87). Average rating: 77.

Starting XI vs. England (June 12, 2010): Tim Howard (87); Steve Cherundolo (72), Jay DeMerit (73), Oguchi Onyewu (74), Carlos Bocanegra (74); Clint Dempsey (75), Michael Bradley (77), Ricardo Clark(70), Landon Donovan (85); Jozy Altidore (75), Robbie Findley (no rating). Average rating: 76.

That tells a story of consistency, although not one of outright improvement. Dig a little deeper and the story becomes more complicated. Christian Pulisic is the best American ever, full stop, end of discussion. If anything, he is perhaps underrated. According to AJ Swoboda at soccer consultancy 21st Club, the Chelsea winger's 2019 season was the only year during which he rated as a Champions League-level impact player. Furthermore, he's alone in that regard, at least in terms of American outfield players. (Tim Howard's 2012-13 campaign is the only other one approaching that elite level.)

More concerning, 21st Club's World Super League and player contribution models show the performance levels of American player might actually be dropping off.

Over the past half decade, the red, white and blue have boasted at least four players who produced Europa League-level quality:

  • 2015: Tim Howard, Fabian Johnson, Geoff Cameron, John Brooks

  • 2016: Johnson, Brooks, Christian Pulisic, Timothy Chandler

  • 2017: Brooks, Pulisic, Chandler, DeAndre Yedlin

  • 2018: Brooks, Pulisic, Chandler, Yedlin

In 2019, however, the number dropped to just two (Yedlin and Brooks), although of course Pulisic disappeared from this group because he moved up rather than down. And while the count of American players starts to pick up at the next level of quality, akin to the second divisions of England, Spain, Italy, Germany and France, the story of decreasing numbers remains the same. "U.S. has held steady with an average of 34 players at this band of talent from 2015 through 2018, but the 2019 calendar year saw this number drop to 24," Swoboda said.

Add this all up and it's cause for concern, although there's cause for hope in the younger generations. The current camp features a wide range of players who are 22 and under, including Reggie Cannon, Julian Araujo, Mark McKenzie, Jackson Yueill, Brenden Aaronson, Brandon Servania, Jesus Ferreira and Ulysses Llanez. Add that to already established or hopeful players such as Sergino Dest, Miles Robinson, Cameron Carter-Vickers, Paxton Pomykal, Weston McKennie, Djordje Mihailovic, Tyler Adams, Josh Sargent, Jonathan Amon and Tim Weah and a pretty picture starts to paint itself. Plus, the most recent U20 team featured emerging talents Chris Gloster, Chris Richards, Alex Mendez and Richard Ledezma, and 17-year-old Giovanni Reyna is just breaking through at Borussia Dortmund.

In the end, the U.S. doesn't need all of those players to reach their potential, but it does need a handful to do so, more than have made it in the past. The American program has more potential game-changing players than it ever has before. Right now, however, it remains to be seen whether anything will come of it or Berhalter will have to make do with a 77 average.

Talent identification

Tab Ramos knows well that a successful manager is a product of his or her support system, even as he took the U.S. U20 national team to the quarterfinals of the FIFA U20 World Cup three times in a row.

"I'd like to fool myself into believing that the only reason we got results is because I'm a great coach," he told ESPN via telephone. "But the bottom line is that great players get results, so the identification is really the most important part of U.S. Soccer."

Yet Ramos is concerned over the direction the federation has taken. The USSF's talent identification program has undergone a restructuring in recent years. During much of Ramos' tenure, there were 12 technical advisers spread out across the country covering club development, youth national team responsibilities and scouting. The scouting piece has now been broken off so that, under Tony Lepore, the USSF's director of boys talent ID, there are three full-time talent ID managers, one each in Los Angeles, Chicago and New York. There are plans to add a fourth.

Underneath the talent ID advisers are around 90 "per diem" scouts who are given individual assignments that include watching a specific player or players or attending showcases and scouting events. Then there are the informal networks that include coaches and staff from MLS and amateur academies, as well as coaches in the Olympic Development Program and id2, the talent identification program used by US Club Soccer. There are comparable numbers on the girls' side. Lepore estimates that the per diem scouts receive a total of about 3,000 assignments per year.

Can Berhalter adjust his tactics?

From the beginning, Berhalter has had a plan. This was part of what piqued U.S. Soccer's interest, and one of the main reasons he got the job in the first place. The powers that be in Soccer House Chicago wanted the exact opposite of the "go out and play" Jurgen Klinsmann years. Berhalter's hiring was, in that sense, the right call, a way to reestablish coherence in a program that was rudderless and lost after the epic failure to qualify for the 2018 World Cup.

During Berhalter's initial phase, the focus was on playing a specific way. "That was a big part of what the first year was about: introduction of new ideas and how Gregg and U.S. Soccer wants to play," said Josh Wolff, who worked as an assistant to Berhalter at the Columbus Crew and with the U.S. before taking a head-coaching job at Austin FC. "Understanding that you're introducing a lot of new players and young players."

That resulted in some, shall we say, interesting performances. Most notable was the 3-0 loss to Mexico when American center-backs Walker Zimmerman, Miles Robinson and Aaron Long, and goalkeeper Zack Steffen, continued to play out of the back despite being overwhelmed and overmatched. The next match against a half-speed Uruguay was slightly better, all part of the learning process, yet the U.S. was too rigid and too inflexible too often in 2019.

A November match with Canada saw the Americans play differently in a 4-1 win. They played long when they needed to, resorting to that under pressure and keeping the quick passing out of the back for the appropriate time. It was, perhaps, a signal of progress and understanding. "[Berhalter] becomes very clear as to what's working and what's not working," Wolff said. "Now is about what direction do we need to go in to educate players and what will put us in the best position to go out and execute on game days?"

While American fans worried that Berhalter wouldn't adjust, the coach quietly showed flexibility. Look no further than his recent comments about Adams -- "We see him primarily as a central midfielder. We always have seen him as central midfielder." -- despite a promise last March that the New York Red Bulls product was a right-back. If 2020 and beyond is going to be a success, Berhalter will need to be more than willing to show he'll alter his plans.

-- Noah Davis

Is the development academy doing its job?

The past 10 years have witnessed some significant changes in U.S. player development. The advent of the USSF Development Academy (DA) in 2007 has raised standards in terms of coaching and practice-to-play ratio. There is now more of an emphasis on developing players via a 10-month program as opposed to focusing on the next result. Facilities have improved as well, especially with MLS investing millions of dollars in youth development.

"It's clear that the DA completely changed the landscape," Lepore said. "It's about the standards that they raised right away."

"I just see a lot of improvement," said FC Dallas manager Luchi Gonzalez, who has also worked in the club's academy. "I believe our youth club teams are representing their club, our league and the U.S. to a high level. You see improvement of our academies to compete with the Real Madrids, with the Monacos, with the River Plates, the Flamengos, even in South America and compete very well. And not just competing in the scoreline but competing in terms of concepts."

Some problems seem intractable. Pay to play remains a burning issue, even as the USSF awarded more than $1 million in DA scholarships for the 2019-20 season. Then there's pay to play's close cousin, finding transportation to play, which can also shut players with two working parents out of opportunities. Having more cost-free academies has certainly helped.

"My strong opinion is that MLS will save U.S. Soccer," Rothenberg said. "MLS and those free academies are opportunities where merit wins out because whether you're talking to the Fire or the Galaxy or Atlanta United, those guys want to develop the best talent regardless of race, regardless of whether or not they can pay."

The DA itself sparks plenty of debate. Stewart has said he wants "the best playing with the best against the best" and it's taken the form of a national league split up into regions. At the U18 and U19 level, the USSF DA has taken to seeding teams in separate divisions, which conspicuously looks set up to accommodate MLS academies -- which sources said had threatened to leave the DA due to substandard competition -- at the expense of their non-MLS brethren. There is near universal agreement among coaches that a season of 25-30 games isn't enough.

The talent ID program begins with identifying 13-year-olds and in some cases 12-year-olds for the U14 national team. It's an age where the number of variables is vast, so Lepore says the pool of U14 players is "much bigger" than the pool of U20 players. The ultimate question is whether this is enough personnel in a nation of more than 300 million people spread across 3.8 million square miles.

"I think up until three years ago, we were heading in the right direction in terms of putting people in place to have them on the ground all over the country, people that you can trust, people that know what we're looking for," Ramos said. "And then they started to have all these cutbacks."

Lepore admitted that the network used to be bigger but said the USSF is intent on focusing on quality. "I would say that this 90 [per diem scouts] helps us cover ground in all the right places, and then we're always replacing or adding where we need to," he said.

The extent to which these scouts are diving into minority communities remains a hot topic. A USSF spokesperson said that two of the three talent ID managers speak Spanish. Of the 90 per diem scouts, the USSF says around 20 are either Spanish speakers or of Latino origin. When asked how many were African American, the USSF said it didn't have such data available.

That ability to connect with minority communities is vital, especially given the impact dual nationals can have on a national team program. Lepore estimates that there are 100 dual nationals in the U.S. pipeline born between 2001 and 2005. The decisions by Dest and Ferreira to represent the U.S. internationally are positives. But the episode involving former U20 international Jonathan Gonzalez, who ultimately decided to represent Mexico, still rankles, the implication being that the USSF didn't do enough to make him feel included.

"These kids have not been unidentified," said Brad Rothenberg, the co-founder of Alianza de Futbol, which holds scouting events in minority communities throughout the U.S. "U.S. Soccer simply doesn't have the resources in the marketplace, in the Latino community, to give these kids a feeling of inclusion."

The Dest and Ferreira cases hint that the USSF has learned its lesson in that it was more aggressive, left nothing to chance and identified prospects early.

"We can't promise anything when it comes to a men's national team, and that's not something I'm going to do because that's a short-lived story that might backfire on you," said USSF sporting director Earnie Stewart. "The most important part to me is that we can look each other in the eye after the fact and say that we've done everything about it."

-- Jeff Carlisle (@JeffreyCarlisle)

Can Berhalter adjust his tactics?

From the beginning, Berhalter has had a plan. This was part of what piqued U.S. Soccer's interest, and one of the main reasons he got the job in the first place. The powers that be in Soccer House Chicago wanted the exact opposite of the "go out and play" Jurgen Klinsmann years. Berhalter's hiring was, in that sense, the right call, a way to reestablish coherence in a program that was rudderless and lost after the epic failure to qualify for the 2018 World Cup.

During Berhalter's initial phase, the focus was on playing a specific way. "That was a big part of what the first year was about: introduction of new ideas and how Gregg and U.S. Soccer wants to play," said Josh Wolff, who worked as an assistant to Berhalter at the Columbus Crew and with the U.S. before taking a head-coaching job at Austin FC. "Understanding that you're introducing a lot of new players and young players."

That resulted in some, shall we say, interesting performances. Most notable was the 3-0 loss to Mexico when American center-backs Walker Zimmerman, Miles Robinson and Aaron Long, and goalkeeper Zack Steffen, continued to play out of the back despite being overwhelmed and overmatched. The next match against a half-speed Uruguay was slightly better, all part of the learning process, yet the U.S. was too rigid and too inflexible too often in 2019.

A November match with Canada saw the Americans play differently in a 4-1 win. They played long when they needed to, resorting to that under pressure and keeping the quick passing out of the back for the appropriate time. It was, perhaps, a signal of progress and understanding. "[Berhalter] becomes very clear as to what's working and what's not working," Wolff said. "Now is about what direction do we need to go in to educate players and what will put us in the best position to go out and execute on game days?"

While American fans worried that Berhalter wouldn't adjust, the coach quietly showed flexibility. Look no further than his recent comments about Adams -- "We see him primarily as a central midfielder. We always have seen him as central midfielder." -- despite a promise last March that the New York Red Bulls product was a right-back. If 2020 and beyond is going to be a success, Berhalter will need to be more than willing to show he'll alter his plans.

-- Noah Davis

Is the development academy doing its job?

The past 10 years have witnessed some significant changes in U.S. player development. The advent of the USSF Development Academy (DA) in 2007 has raised standards in terms of coaching and practice-to-play ratio. There is now more of an emphasis on developing players via a 10-month program as opposed to focusing on the next result. Facilities have improved as well, especially with MLS investing millions of dollars in youth development.

"It's clear that the DA completely changed the landscape," Lepore said. "It's about the standards that they raised right away."

"I just see a lot of improvement," said FC Dallas manager Luchi Gonzalez, who has also worked in the club's academy. "I believe our youth club teams are representing their club, our league and the U.S. to a high level. You see improvement of our academies to compete with the Real Madrids, with the Monacos, with the River Plates, the Flamengos, even in South America and compete very well. And not just competing in the scoreline but competing in terms of concepts."

Some problems seem intractable. Pay to play remains a burning issue, even as the USSF awarded more than $1 million in DA scholarships for the 2019-20 season. Then there's pay to play's close cousin, finding transportation to play, which can also shut players with two working parents out of opportunities. Having more cost-free academies has certainly helped.

"My strong opinion is that MLS will save U.S. Soccer," Rothenberg said. "MLS and those free academies are opportunities where merit wins out because whether you're talking to the Fire or the Galaxy or Atlanta United, those guys want to develop the best talent regardless of race, regardless of whether or not they can pay."

The DA itself sparks plenty of debate. Stewart has said he wants "the best playing with the best against the best" and it's taken the form of a national league split up into regions. At the U18 and U19 level, the USSF DA has taken to seeding teams in separate divisions, which conspicuously looks set up to accommodate MLS academies -- which sources said had threatened to leave the DA due to substandard competition -- at the expense of their non-MLS brethren. There is near universal agreement among coaches that a season of 25-30 games isn't enough.

"I think the DA is absolutely the best league that will happen in this country," said Bernie James, the director of Crossfire Premier, a club based in Redmond, Washington. "But I think the people leading it are misguided. There's not enough games, and now our U19 team's closest game is 800 miles away because somehow they put us in a lower tier even though we beat everyone in the upper tier."

The travel costs are an issue as well. Gonzalez called the logistics and cost -- about $200,000 per year for two teams -- "insane" and suggested that DA clubs, especially for the lower age groups, might be better off looking for competition in their own backyards.

There is also the question of whether the efforts of the DA are actually leading to more first-team opportunities, at least in MLS. The relative ease with which green cards are procured, thus allowing players previously classified as internationals to become domestic, creates even more pressure.

"I look at our roster in general, there's very few Americans. Very few," said Ramos, who was appointed Houston Dynamo manager in October. "And not just young Americans but of any age. Obviously, the rules are you try to put together the best team you can. The green card rule in the league almost forces clubs to choose foreign players."

The DA is here for the foreseeable future, but it could use some tweaking.

-- Jeff Carlisle

https://www.espn.com/soccer/united-states-usa/story/4046848/state-of-the-usmnt-assessing-the-us-on-talent-identification-player-development-and-tactical-evolution

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice pass...

Did Haaland happen to be born Stateside while a parent was working for an American company?

🙏🏻

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Napoleon said:

Nice pass...

Did Haaland happen to be born Stateside while a parent was working for an American company?

🙏🏻

Haaland, Reyna, and Sancho were all born in England (Leeds, Sunderland, London).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Schulz2.0 said:

Haaland, Reyna, and Sancho were all born in England (Leeds, Sunderland, London).

I didn't realize Leeds. Was fun times when they were fighting for a CL spot in the late 90's early 2000's. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...