Jump to content
tokamak

The Surly Architecture Thread

Recommended Posts

Yeah well, Chaillac in in the middle of nowhere.... as much as one can be in central France. Friend is going to make it into a B&B eventually when e retires in several years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got the two 17 foot legs mortice and tennoned and dressed and managed to get one in to place

Bricklayer getting on with window at last and I am making dogs 

image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Major move forward today

Joists being fitted and arch going in

Beams concreted in and more legs in position, a happy bunny 

image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Extensive mortise & tenon work going into the framework inside the old barn:

Cinema window finally in, it just has to be pointed up on the brick joints with the local lime coloured mortar.

Arch ready for principal beams and principal beam being jointed 

image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At last getting somewhere, the big three are entering the building, huge timbers that are crucial to the weight bearing strength of the frame.

Basically I have built a frame surrounding the inner walls of the old barn which stands on long 6 inch X 6 inch legs which in turn support 8 inch by 6 inch beams that joists run into.

These run in general to the central block work centre

Also there will be a stair gallery and that is what the big three timbers will support cantilevered over the walls and sitting on arches

We are now putting the big three in

See photos and descriptions below
image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg
Oak work is quite strenuous but rewarding

The crates are essential and we made a run way of them with planks on top and used broom handles cut down as rollers to get them to the two tonne hoist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's one of those ideas that someone comes up with in a daydream but then within 8 seconds has a list of about 15 reasons why it'd never actually work. Apparently in China, those ideas are now making it all the way to the finished product.

 

(talking about the waterfall, not SJU)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/24/2018 at 10:54 AM, tokamak said:

Sky SOHO in Beijing, by Zaha Hadid.

 

29048978547_0a43b8cc30_k.jpgSky SOHO by fernando herrera, on Flickr

43938290392_060f374a5c_k.jpgSky SOHO by fernando herrera, on Flickr

43081072485_d4bb80fef4_k.jpgSky SOHO by fernando herrera, on Flickr

43081070225_39f8365336_k.jpgSky SOHO by fernando herrera, on Flickr

29048959907_42ad7015ce_k.jpgSky SOHO by fernando herrera, on Flickr

Looks like a train

 

something something your mom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/13/2018 at 9:27 PM, Baboontyme said:

I was going to post this last week, but wasn't sure where. The ultimate American ruin porn site, Michigan Central Station, abandoned Detroit commuter rail hub. I know I have discussed it with Swayze in the past. It was bought by a local billionaire family 20ish years ago and left to rot as Tiger Stadium and the Corktown neighborhood around it crumbled. With some prodding from the Mayor's office, they began to replace the windows and clean it up over the past few years as Corktown began to revive a bit and the Police Athletic League rebuilt Tiger Stadium as a youth baseball facility (you can see the Depot in the background). 

It was announced this week (unofficially) that Ford is buying the Depot and moving a bunch of employees down there to inhabit the building and a few other surrounding warehouses as the central hub for their autonomous vehicle division. Exciting news for the city but also going to very cool to see what they do with this magnificent structure. The rumor is they plan to keep the atrium/lobby open to the public. 

db226aff0c10c08852d771345b283bfd.jpg_81222791_rick-harris-flickr-granted.jpg6357536930246963101259309204_5260170376_shemmerle_2009-7470-bearbeitet.jpgMCSlobbyupHDRps1.jpg

I'm really glad they did this.  Fingers crossed that they don't fuck up the soul of the building when they repair it

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reviving this old thread because I saw this on Reddit today. Frank Lloyd Wright's unbuilt design for a new Arizona state capitol - "The Oasis", 1957.

9eb5f972-396e-4aa7-bbfa-79f2bb24b7d0-The

dab918ad-d780-4f32-a1dc-949fc4bdecaf-The

There's a reason why this dude was the GOAT.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, tokamak said:

Reviving this old thread because I saw this on Reddit today. Frank Lloyd Wright's unbuilt design for a new Arizona state capitol - "The Oasis", 1957.

9eb5f972-396e-4aa7-bbfa-79f2bb24b7d0-The

dab918ad-d780-4f32-a1dc-949fc4bdecaf-The

There's a reason why this dude was the GOAT.

Funny,  I'm working on an addition now, and I used the triangular detail atop those double columns for a glass bay detail for inspiration on that project.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Onboard 2.0, do you ever watch The Most Extraordinary Homes in the World or something like that on Netflix? I've been watching it lately. It's a little silly sometimes, and the hosts are kind of over the top (lots of "this is the greatest privilege of my life" hyperbole) but they showcase 3-4 interesting houses each episode, by up-and-coming architects (or at least, not super famous ones that I've heard of). There's some cool stuff on there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, tokamak said:

@Onboard 2.0, do you ever watch The Most Extraordinary Homes in the World or something like that on Netflix? I've been watching it lately. It's a little silly sometimes, and the hosts are kind of over the top (lots of "this is the greatest privilege of my life" hyperbole) but they showcase 3-4 interesting houses each episode, by up-and-coming architects (or at least, not super famous ones that I've heard of). There's some cool stuff on there.

Yeah I know about it, but  haven't caught an episode yet. Had a friend tell me about it.  Those kind of shows often get a little silly but always enjoy watching them 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, tokamak said:

@Onboard 2.0, do you ever watch The Most Extraordinary Homes in the World or something like that on Netflix? I've been watching it lately. It's a little silly sometimes, and the hosts are kind of over the top (lots of "this is the greatest privilege of my life" hyperbole) but they showcase 3-4 interesting houses each episode, by up-and-coming architects (or at least, not super famous ones that I've heard of). There's some cool stuff on there.

I've watched all the episodes available on Netflix. Most of the houses are truly masterpieces, some I'm not sure how ordinary people live in them (I'm looking at you Rural House by RCR Architects), and all were very interesting for various reasons even if not my style. It's a great show to binge if you want a visual feast. 

They need more Grand Designs episodes NOW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TankedBevo said:

I've watched all the episodes available on Netflix. Most of the houses are truly masterpieces, some I'm not sure how ordinary people live in them (I'm looking at you Rural House by RCR Architects), and all were very interesting for various reasons even if not my style. It's a great show to binge if you want a visual feast. 

They need more Grand Designs episodes NOW

It's been on my need to watch list for a couple months now. That rural house is little a brutal for my taste, but would love to have a client asking for something that contemporary, and sculptural. Totally diggin' the Corten steel siding.  Love that material. I've talked a few clients into going that route.  

One a metro modern mountain design as I call it. Traditional vernacular forms pared down, twisted and juxtaposed, clad with industrial, and traditional cladding: corten, galvalume corrugated metal, bd & batten siding, standing seam metal roof  all resting on a site "quarried" fieldstone base. Husband wanted a cabin in the woods, wife wanted something more modern. 

Working on an addition in an early 19th c. residential neighborhood right now. The clients are looking at a very minimalist, Corten clad modern addition to play off the early 19th c. clapboard sided federal style home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My maternal  grandfather had David R. Williams design and build his house at 3805 McFarland Blvd. in University Park back in the old days (1932).  The house still stands and is a pretty neat piece of property.  To the best of my knowledge there have only been two (maybe 3) owners of the property, starting with my dear old grandpappy.

My uncle and deceased mom were pretty much raised in the house.  Several years ago, my uncle was in Dallas having traveled in from CA.  He somehow got in contact with the owners,  explained who he was and asked if he could come  by and take a look. To his surprise, they said "come on by" and he popped in.  He said the place pretty much stayed the same with no renovation but some updated mechanical features.  It seemed the owner new they had a treasure of a house and didn't booger it up.

My uncle asked them if they had every been back behind some of the walls and into the secreted rooms and spaces.  The owners said "no, what are you talking  about?"  He showed them in certain areas of the house you could pull down a sconce or a piece of built-in trim work and a lever would release a bookshelf or some such and the thing would swing open.  The owners were amazed as they had no idea.  They walked in and my uncle found and old jacket, a few play toys and book; all of which had my uncle's name on them.  

Pretty cool stuff.

Anyway, you can see the Williams' House (no relation) and David R. Williams other works at the links shown below.

http://significanthomes.com/home/3805-mcfarlin-boulevard-dallas-texas/attachment-10926/

http://significanthomes.com/architect/david-r-williams/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, deadshank said:

My maternal  grandfather had David R. Williams design and build his house at 3805 McFarland Blvd. in University Park back in the old days (1932).  The house still stands and is a pretty neat piece of property.  To the best of my knowledge there have only been two (maybe 3) owners of the property, starting with my dear old grandpappy.

My uncle and deceased mom were pretty much raised in the house.  Several years ago, my uncle was in Dallas having traveled in from CA.  He somehow got in contact with the owners,  explained who he was and asked if he could come  by and take a look. To his surprise, they said "come on by" and he popped in.  He said the place pretty much stayed the same with no renovation but some updated mechanical features.  It seemed the owner new they had a treasure of a house and didn't booger it up.

My uncle asked them if they had every been back behind some of the walls and into the secreted rooms and spaces.  The owners said "no, what are you talking  about?"  He showed them in certain areas of the house you could pull down a sconce or a piece of built-in trim work and a lever would release a bookshelf or some such and the thing would swing open.  The owners were amazed as they had no idea.  They walked in and my uncle found and old jacket, a few play toys and book; all of which had my uncle's name on them.  

Pretty cool stuff.

Anyway, you can see the Williams' House (no relation) and David R. Williams other works at the links shown below.

http://significanthomes.com/home/3805-mcfarlin-boulevard-dallas-texas/attachment-10926/

http://significanthomes.com/architect/david-r-williams/

Cool story, thanks for sharing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are a lot of grand old houses in the park cities that nouveau troglodytes have scraped for their faux chateaux.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, deadshank said:

My maternal  grandfather had David R. Williams design and build his house at 3805 McFarland Blvd. in University Park back in the old days (1932).  The house still stands and is a pretty neat piece of property.  To the best of my knowledge there have only been two (maybe 3) owners of the property, starting with my dear old grandpappy.

My uncle and deceased mom were pretty much raised in the house.  Several years ago, my uncle was in Dallas having traveled in from CA.  He somehow got in contact with the owners,  explained who he was and asked if he could come  by and take a look. To his surprise, they said "come on by" and he popped in.  He said the place pretty much stayed the same with no renovation but some updated mechanical features.  It seemed the owner new they had a treasure of a house and didn't booger it up.

My uncle asked them if they had every been back behind some of the walls and into the secreted rooms and spaces.  The owners said "no, what are you talking  about?"  He showed them in certain areas of the house you could pull down a sconce or a piece of built-in trim work and a lever would release a bookshelf or some such and the thing would swing open.  The owners were amazed as they had no idea.  They walked in and my uncle found and old jacket, a few play toys and book; all of which had my uncle's name on them.  

Pretty cool stuff.

Anyway, you can see the Williams' House (no relation) and David R. Williams other works at the links shown below.

http://significanthomes.com/home/3805-mcfarlin-boulevard-dallas-texas/attachment-10926/

http://significanthomes.com/architect/david-r-williams/

That’s a badass story.  Thanks for sharing. Now imagine that you were a kid living in that house, and how pissed you would be that your home contained secret rooms that your parents didn’t know about, and you didn’t know about them either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/25/2020 at 10:08 AM, Onboard 2.0 said:

It's been on my need to watch list for a couple months now. That rural house is little a brutal for my taste, but would love to have a client asking for something that contemporary, and sculptural. Totally diggin' the Corten steel siding.  Love that material. I've talked a few clients into going that route.  

 

I'm a developer with a focus on contemporary architectural projects. Had a project about 10 years ago with Corten steel spec'd out, but it just wouldn't pencil (and was probably too heavy for the cantilever anyway).   Instead we overlapped sheet metal squares, hosed it down for a week to get a good rust going, then sealed it.  Voila, faux Corten Steel.

OG.jpg.1ec68fecd491709b42a715db8ff6a4f5.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Mach 1 said:

I'm a developer with a focus on contemporary architectural projects. Had a project about 10 years ago with Corten steel spec'd out, but it just wouldn't pencil (and was probably too heavy for the cantilever anyway).   Instead we overlapped sheet metal squares, hosed it down for a week to get a good rust going, then sealed it.  Voila, faux Corten Steel.

OG.jpg.1ec68fecd491709b42a715db8ff6a4f5.jpg

Veeeeery clever.  Sealed with a clear urethane type product I guess ?  Probably less expensive as well. May have to investigate that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Onboard 2.0 said:

Veeeeery clever.  Sealed with a clear urethane type product I guess ?  Probably less expensive as well. May have to investigate that.

Can't recall what we used, but it only lasted 10 years.  The HOA had to redo it recently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Mach 1 said:

Can't recall what we used, but it only lasted 10 years.  The HOA had to redo it recently.

The sealant  ?  Still not bad.  I'm doing more contemporary now than I've done my whole 35 year career. We were so tied to traditional architecture around  here for so long.  It's like a breath of fresh air.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have they changed up Corten?

Because two of the more notorious early Corten projects never stopped rusting (the Communications Building and Westinghouse motor plant).

Probably dodged a bullet with your fake Corten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, TwiceHorn said:

Have they changed up Corten?

Because two of the more notorious early Corten projects never stopped rusting (the Communications Building and Westinghouse motor plant).

Probably dodged a bullet with your fake Corten.

Rust never sleeps.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...