Jump to content
El Diablo

I'm An Alcoholic

Recommended Posts

Went to the 7am at Harbor this morning where a host of friends (52} welcomed me as they do every morning.  Watched as a newcomer picked up his first 30 day chip and listened as he shared about spending this Thanksgiving sober for the first time in his life.  Reflected on all of the men who have gone before me to the big meeting in heaven and what an impact each one of them had in my sober life.  Watched and listened as each person called on to share expressed gratitude for what the program has brought them.  Was reminded that each day of sobriety is a day of Thanksgiving.  Will be reaching out to all family members scattered throughout the country later today to tell them how much I appreciate and love them-and thanks to the program, they will return the favor.  Since April 28, 1998, this miracle has been repeating itself, and it never ceases to amaze me how grateful I am today for the life I now have thanks to AA.  May each one of you have a day full of joy, happiness, and serenity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, pch said:

Went to the 7am at Harbor this morning where a host of friends (52} welcomed me as they do every morning.  Watched as a newcomer picked up his first 30 day chip and listened as he shared about spending this Thanksgiving sober for the first time in his life.  Reflected on all of the men who have gone before me to the big meeting in heaven and what an impact each one of them had in my sober life.  Watched and listened as each person called on to share expressed gratitude for what the program has brought them.  Was reminded that each day of sobriety is a day of Thanksgiving.  Will be reaching out to all family members scattered throughout the country later today to tell them how much I appreciate and love them-and thanks to the program, they will return the favor.  Since April 28, 1998, this miracle has been repeating itself, and it never ceases to amaze me how grateful I am today for the life I now have thanks to AA.  May each one of you have a day full of joy, happiness, and serenity.

And to you, also.  And everyone here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanksgiving has always been my favorite holiday, but now more than ever I realize it is our holiday.  

I was hopeless before sobriety countless times and I have been fairly close to hopeless even in sobriety.  My mind has a tendency to look at the future as a dark void when things aren't going the way I want them in the present.  I am so lucky today though to have tools, most important of which is gratitude.  It is a powerful fucking weapon against my biggest demon, hopelessness.  When I take a moment to realize I have a bed, a roof, or even a few people care about me, I can reset and see a tiny bit of light in the darkness of my thoughts.  If I choose to follow the light that gratitude gives me, I can face the day and see what the world has yet to show me.  I'm so thankful for being taught to pause and count my small blessings, because sometimes I just need one more day to change it all.  

So grateful for you all.  Tell someone you're thankful for them today.  It might just save a life, and that life might be yours.  Much love, happy Thanksgiving Day.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday too.  4 years ago I was having Thanksgiving with a bunch of bottomed out drunks at La Hacienda.  My now wife's family friend Lou drove down and hung out with us (I mean, her, but I was there).  In March he was at our wedding and pulled us aside saying how honored he was to have been included and etc etc etc - yeah man, obviously.  Which is what I told him.  Also apparently 4 years ago there was going to at least be some sort of intervention or intervening going on at Thanksgiving, where it was reliable that I would show up even if I never answered calls or texts or e-mails.  That would've put a damper on the holiday, glad i hit bottom before then.  I think I missed some shitty UT games too.

At any rate, I just now thought "Oh yeah, my shaggy alcoholic friends!".  Only at this point in the day because it's a day that I love and being an alcoholic isn't a thing about it one way or the other and it wasn't at the front of my mind to think about people who might not be back in a place where it's just easy.  So, I'm thankful for all you guys, I'm thankful for your sobriety, or for the people who read this and haven't taken the plunge or fully admitted it (I know you're there), I'm thankful for your curiosity.  I'm thankful for the opportunity that still lives for y'all to enjoy days like today without alcohol or whatever your problem is even being a factor.  Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

Edited by Celery Man

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a good idea for anyone, and critical for an alcoholic, to take nothing for granted.

I'm alive.  I'm sober.  I'm healthy.

And I'm grateful.

The rest is just details.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have avoided this thread out of fear. Still drinking a 750MLer a night. Since I hit bottom around 2 months ago, I’ve found a job, worked out and lost crazy weight, have a great relationship with all my family. But they think I’m sober. I’m doing it all great, except I hit the booze everyday still, but have mastered hiding It. At this point, booze just gives me the perk I need to feel content. I really love it. I know my insides are dying though, and there is no such thing as a functional alcoholic as much as I want it. When I’m not drinking, I just do not like myself, and am a very mundane dude. Booze gives me energy, excitement, purpose. I really hate this. I really want to quit, and am not physically dependent yet. But when I go a few days sober, I get to a point where I romanticize my drinking and have a drink, and it snowballs from there. And I rinse and repeat this bullshit. I really love alcohol, I do.     

Edited by hundredTT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Counterpoint - you feel energy and excitement when drunk and dreary when you don’t because your dopamine receptors are burnt out from consistent alcohol intake. You feel alive when you’re drunk because that is your baseline and it feels even better in contrast with sobriety when you either feel anxiety or nothing at all. Because the system in your brain that controls those feelings doesn’t get to zero until you’re a few drinks in.

If you stopped drinking for a period of weeks to months you would find a normal balance returning. Even an abnormal balance for a bit as your brain returns to equilibrium. It’s a thing, it happens, it trips a lot of people up because they feel so great they must be cured.

Glad you’re still with us. Nothing to fear from coming back here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its important to understand what alcohol does to the mind, to read up on it. It helps a person understand why they feel certain ways and thus helps combat negative emotions. Even after the drink is gone, 6, 7 months later, I could say to myself these fucked up thoughts, selfish thoughts are a product of virtually a lifetime of drinking, to have patience to keep turning things around and things do turn around. A famous AA speaker described it as slowly turning a ship around... the Queen Mary to be exact.

Alcohol is both a stimulant and a depressant, the double whammy. It makes you feel high on life and then it drags you down. The beauty of sobriety, really the beauty in life, is to find the middle ground, not too high, not too low. So many of us get stuck on wanting that high to last a lifetime. Reality is that its impossible to remain high 24/7, we always come crashing down, hurt ourselves and others, eventually die. It's better to step back and enjoy the beauty of life with an even mind. Its entirely possible for everyone to do.

Edited by Dewey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last 2 posts are the truth.

[mention=4327]hundredTT[/mention] thank you for checking in. One question though - you said you were avoiding this thread out of fear - fear of what?

 

Love and bro hugs to y'all.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/1/2019 at 3:36 AM, Celery Man said:

Counterpoint - you feel energy and excitement when drunk and dreary when you don’t because your dopamine receptors are burnt out from consistent alcohol intake. You feel alive when you’re drunk because that is your baseline and it feels even better in contrast with sobriety when you either feel anxiety or nothing at all. Because the system in your brain that controls those feelings doesn’t get to zero until you’re a few drinks in.

If you stopped drinking for a period of weeks to months you would find a normal balance returning. Even an abnormal balance for a bit as your brain returns to equilibrium. It’s a thing, it happens, it trips a lot of people up because they feel so great they must be cured.

Glad you’re still with us. Nothing to fear from coming back here.

I'm meeting with a young dude tonight who says he needs to talk to someone about his drinking.  I think he is being pressured in to it by his parents and not sure if he will even show up, but this right here is going to be a vital part of what I talk to him about.  Kid is a phenomenal guitar player and is a band that tours all over the country.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll just say my experience is that if you're the only one teetering off the deep end, people get sick of your shit even if you don't cause nearly as much as you could.  I think there are a lot of different band dynamics that can play out with alcoholism.  Rather than try and take my experience and speculatively extrapolate out a broader truth, I'd just say there are a couple of ways in which my alcoholism contributed to.... my falling out with the guys in my band or otherwise the end of my days as a touring musician

From a very abstract thing that may not communicate well to someone still struggling with it, the whole thing where people who are alcoholics fundamentally have issues with control, letting go, rolling with the punches, etc, made me a more difficult person pre-sobriety even without the stuff directly tied to drinking.

As drinking became more of a necessity, it also made me more difficult in my ability to roll with the punches in a kind of general way.  I couldn't get shitfaced at a show, I had to perform/drive/function/etc, but I needed to get x amount of drunk before I'd be anxious because I needed to get to X level of drunk before I could sleep, or just because I wanted to go shut everything out and finish my day, which takes a few hours.  Or maybe I don't have enough booze at home and the stores are going to be closed, whatever - all the stuff that you have to do to maintain your addiction are difficult when you're tied at the hip to a bunch of guys doing shit like playing concerts.  And an alcoholic stressing out about that stuff and getting irritable is not everyone's favorite guy, and nobody really understands what your problem is (so, you're just an asshole).

As the disease progresses, and especially in touring, there were more and more nights when you're just doing the things you do and going along OK and then *click* you've hit that level of drunk where you're a problem.  That happens more and more, people get sick of it, it becomes more clear that you have a problem, or that you are a problem.  Also everything leading up to that - getting sloppier in advance of performances, making mistakes.  Spending time apart from the band, not being reliable in that way, or just drifting in the basic group dynamics of the thing where you become more of an outsider as you also become more of a problem.

Maybe that's the thing.  It's progressive.  You can't control it.  You can try and control it, it makes you miserable to be around, but you still eventually lose control and then it's more impossible or frightening to be around.  It's just not sustainable in life in general, but... you know, also in life on the road in a band where you're playing in bars every night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Celery Man said:

Maybe that's the thing.  It's progressive.  You can't control it. 

Alcoholism gives off a very seductive vibe of control when you're neck deep in it, whether it's telling you you're in control of the drinking or you're in control of your life, or your faculties, your decision-making, you name it. It doesn't feel out of control until it's already been way out of control for a long time, further than you ever thought possible when you first started consciously thinking about your drinking in that way that we do and normal drinkers don't. 

Really, even at the very end, I only had two problems with my drinking. It made me feel like I was dying, and it made me wish I was dead. Otherwise...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Spending time apart from the band, not being reliable in that way, or just drifting in the basic group dynamics of the thing where you become more of an outsider as you also become more of a problem.

 

Same things that happen to any alkie in their relationships with pretty much anyone they're close with. Hell, don't even have to be close. People just kinda drift away, no reason given. But if there's some amends to be made and they're cognizant and honest I have found that it's often the case that they didn't like being around the asshole me. People detach. Sometimes it's with love and some times not so much.

Edited by El Diablo
there, their, they're

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/1/2019 at 7:23 AM, Dewey said:

Its important to understand what alcohol does to the mind, to read up on it. It helps a person understand why they feel certain ways and thus helps combat negative emotions. Even after the drink is gone, 6, 7 months later, I could say to myself these fucked up thoughts, selfish thoughts are a product of virtually a lifetime of drinking, to have patience to keep turning things around and things do turn around. A famous AA speaker described it as slowly turning a ship around... the Queen Mary to be exact.

Alcohol is both a stimulant and a depressant, the double whammy. It makes you feel high on life and then it drags you down. The beauty of sobriety, really the beauty in life, is to find the middle ground, not too high, not too low. So many of us get stuck on wanting that high to last a lifetime. Reality is that its impossible to remain high 24/7, we always come crashing down, hurt ourselves and others, eventually die. It's better to step back and enjoy the beauty of life with an even mind. Its entirely possible for everyone to do.

I feel like this is the best post I've ever read in my life. I love the high life and always feel like booze gives me that edge to be interesting, interested, and in the moment. My whole life has been mostly high and low. When I have been content, it was when I found the in -between. But I cannot sustain it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Kennythetiger said:

None of us could, man. That’s why we’re here. 

And virtually all of us thought we were hiding it...and we weren't.  We weren't fooling anyone except ourselves. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Happy Birthday @TwiceHorn.
 

I went to a meeting where I got sober today (hadn’t been there in years) and was surprised to hear they are struggling and in danger of being no more. Like me, I guess, people have moved or moved on, others have died, and the area isn’t the greatest and has continued to decline. There is a season for all things, as is said, and I’m grateful that this dying group I didn’t recognize today existed for me 5 years ago as a vibrant place full of good, sponsor based sobriety and service work.

I guess if you stick around the program long enough you’ll see your fair share of death and I had heard that a lot, but it didn’t dawn on me that death couldn’t extend to a group or community.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hadn’t been to this page in awhile but I’m glad I took a look again. I’m the addict that identifies as an alcoholic at meetings for respect and I don’t think we have an addict thread on surly(?). Anyway, just wanted to say that everything that has been posted the past few pages is absolutely incredible. It’s amazing when people post uplifting success stories and when people post that they are struggling. As seen above, the outpouring support that almost immediately happens when someone posts that they are in the thick of it is almost magical. Surly can be such an enigma- a group of people with a common love that spiders out to so many other diverse topics.

 

Anyway, I wanted to post that I just passed my 5 months sober from opiates. I also am halfway done with writing a book on my story and the opiate epidemic. I have a publisher and an editor and all of that-this isn’t a project, it’s a real book deal. I rarely try to plug things but I think in this instance I will. I’m looking to speak with anyone that has been affected by an opiate addiction. Whether it’s an addict, someone that knows/loves and addict, family friend to someone that has died/overdoes from opiates, anyone that works with opiate addicts,  a good therapist that works in this area, a lawyer in this field, etc. If you know anyone, please direct message me. I’m not doing this book to try to make money, when my editor asked what I was trying to do I said,” I want one person to come up to me and say that the book helped save _____ life. Just one life”. That’s my goal and hopefully surly can help as it usually goes. If you don’t know anyone, you can also help by messaging me what you would like to read in a book about this crisis. I got the deal because I have an interesting story so there will be an aspect that is engaging to the reader-kind of a million little pieces-ish-as well as stories of others, some research, interviews and facts. I don’t want it to be too formal and not interesting to read. I know reading on a horrible epidemic isn’t the most “fun” to read so I am asking what people would like to learn more about and just what in general would make you pick up a book like this. Thank you in advance! Im glad to be sober another day. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, RockyMountainHighHorn said:

Hadn’t been to this page in awhile but I’m glad I took a look again. I’m the addict that identifies as an alcoholic at meetings for respect and I don’t think we have an addict thread on surly(?). Anyway, just wanted to say that everything that has been posted the past few pages is absolutely incredible. It’s amazing when people post uplifting success stories and when people post that they are struggling. As seen above, the outpouring support that almost immediately happens when someone posts that they are in the thick of it is almost magical. Surly can be such an enigma- a group of people with a common love that spiders out to so many other diverse topics.

 

Anyway, I wanted to post that I just passed my 5 months sober from opiates. I also am halfway done with writing a book on my story and the opiate epidemic. I have a publisher and an editor and all of that-this isn’t a project, it’s a real book deal. I rarely try to plug things but I think in this instance I will. I’m looking to speak with anyone that has been affected by an opiate addiction. Whether it’s an addict, someone that knows/loves and addict, family friend to someone that has died/overdoes from opiates, anyone that works with opiate addicts,  a good therapist that works in this area, a lawyer in this field, etc. If you know anyone, please direct message me. I’m not doing this book to try to make money, when my editor asked what I was trying to do I said,” I want one person to come up to me and say that the book helped save _____ life. Just one life”. That’s my goal and hopefully surly can help as it usually goes. If you don’t know anyone, you can also help by messaging me what you would like to read in a book about this crisis. I got the deal because I have an interesting story so there will be an aspect that is engaging to the reader-kind of a million little pieces-ish-as well as stories of others, some research, interviews and facts. I don’t want it to be too formal and not interesting to read. I know reading on a horrible epidemic isn’t the most “fun” to read so I am asking what people would like to learn more about and just what in general would make you pick up a book like this. Thank you in advance! Im glad to be sober another day. 

First thing that came to mind, that would make it interesting to someone like me, who has had addictions, but not an opiate addiction, is to hear opiate addicts that have had other addictions, but at different times and have them compare those other addictions to opiate addiction.  Maybe it's not even possible to find many people like that to talk to. I don't know, just kind of thinking out loud after I read your post. But that might diversify your readership and reach a lot more people.  

And a big congrats on 5 months. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/2/2019 at 1:00 PM, hullabelew said:

Kid is a phenomenal guitar player and is a band that tours all over the country.   

Working the club circuit is tough. I used to manage/bartend during the week and DJ on the weekends. Everyone wants to buy you a drink. I remember one Saturday night when the entire band got DWIs in different vehicles leaving the gig.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, RubyManJack said:

Happy Birthday @TwiceHorn.
 

I went to a meeting where I got sober today (hadn’t been there in years) and was surprised to hear they are struggling and in danger of being no more. Like me, I guess, people have moved or moved on, others have died, and the area isn’t the greatest and has continued to decline. There is a season for all things, as is said, and I’m grateful that this dying group I didn’t recognize today existed for me 5 years ago as a vibrant place full of good, sponsor based sobriety and service work.

I guess if you stick around the program long enough you’ll see your fair share of death and I had heard that a lot, but it didn’t dawn on me that death couldn’t extend to a group or community.

Hey, thanks man.  Glad you're still around.

Yeah, my church-based group has turned over almost 100%.  It was all guys and a few gals over 50, probably 60, when I started there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, RockyMountainHighHorn said:

Hadn’t been to this page in awhile but I’m glad I took a look again. I’m the addict that identifies as an alcoholic at meetings for respect and I don’t think we have an addict thread on surly(?). Anyway, just wanted to say that everything that has been posted the past few pages is absolutely incredible. It’s amazing when people post uplifting success stories and when people post that they are struggling. As seen above, the outpouring support that almost immediately happens when someone posts that they are in the thick of it is almost magical. Surly can be such an enigma- a group of people with a common love that spiders out to so many other diverse topics.

 

Anyway, I wanted to post that I just passed my 5 months sober from opiates. I also am halfway done with writing a book on my story and the opiate epidemic. I have a publisher and an editor and all of that-this isn’t a project, it’s a real book deal. I rarely try to plug things but I think in this instance I will. I’m looking to speak with anyone that has been affected by an opiate addiction. Whether it’s an addict, someone that knows/loves and addict, family friend to someone that has died/overdoes from opiates, anyone that works with opiate addicts,  a good therapist that works in this area, a lawyer in this field, etc. If you know anyone, please direct message me. I’m not doing this book to try to make money, when my editor asked what I was trying to do I said,” I want one person to come up to me and say that the book helped save _____ life. Just one life”. That’s my goal and hopefully surly can help as it usually goes. If you don’t know anyone, you can also help by messaging me what you would like to read in a book about this crisis. I got the deal because I have an interesting story so there will be an aspect that is engaging to the reader-kind of a million little pieces-ish-as well as stories of others, some research, interviews and facts. I don’t want it to be too formal and not interesting to read. I know reading on a horrible epidemic isn’t the most “fun” to read so I am asking what people would like to learn more about and just what in general would make you pick up a book like this. Thank you in advance! Im glad to be sober another day. 

Congrats.

I'm one of those readers who downloads lots of "samples" on Kindle and I end up buying/reading the whole volume about 20% of the time.  My suggestion would be to stay away from the politics, economics, history, and criminal justice implications of the epidemic, even in the introduction.  IMO that's complex, defies logic, is depressing as hell, and should be covered in a separate volume if so desired.

My suggestion would be to sharpen the focus on personal stories - and what it finally took to get clean.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I posted about my BIL a while back. He's gone to Rancho Cold Ones a few times now and always leaves early because "he's good now" and declares himself "better."  Obviously he's fooling himself and, honestly, he's a catered-to, spoiled and pampered guy living off of what his father built.  BIL is a good guy but hasn't pissed a drop his whole life.  The old man is gone now and he's missing him, missing the structure and the direction his dad gave him and I think he knows he's lazy, not good at things and now he's scared.  So, he hits the bottle and now the bottle controls him and he's screwing up in big ways now. 

Their company sold and he was kept on by the new owners (BIG conglomerate). First thing he does is shit the bed piss drunk at a national sales meeting and grope a female sales rep.  Canned immediately.  Now no gig, old lady and kids are rightfully alarmed and pissed.  He's trying hard but went back to the bottle the other night. Cops pick him up all shitty and driving (on private property). They know him and let him dry out  and release him with trespassing and harassment charges. 

Now he's off to a new recovery facility out of town.  Not with the common addicts / alcoholics but at a real expensive, high speed / low drag place with private rooms and a bunch of country club like amenities. 

I know he hasn't hit bottom yet and his financial means keeps him out of legal hot water and in the lap of luxury.  I've spoken with him about his problems and he's been honest about his addiction and the problems it causes. It just seems to me that he's not really ready to overcome his personal demons and addiction issues. 

I know you guys battle every day and I'm proud of y'all for it.  As a concerned, regarded BIL, do you have any advice on how to communicate and show better support?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, deadshank said:

I posted about my BIL a while back. He's gone to Rancho Cold Ones a few times now and always leaves early because "he's good now" and declares himself "better."  Obviously he's fooling himself and, honestly, he's a catered-to, spoiled and pampered guy living off of what his father built.  BIL is a good guy but hasn't pissed a drop his whole life.  The old man is gone now and he's missing him, missing the structure and the direction his dad gave him and I think he knows he's lazy, not good at things and now he's scared.  So, he hits the bottle and now the bottle controls him and he's screwing up in big ways now. 

Their company sold and he was kept on by the new owners (BIG conglomerate). First thing he does is shit the bed piss drunk at a national sales meeting and grope a female sales rep.  Canned immediately.  Now no gig, old lady and kids are rightfully alarmed and pissed.  He's trying hard but went back to the bottle the other night. Cops pick him up all shitty and driving (on private property). They know him and let him dry out  and release him with trespassing and harassment charges. 

Now he's off to a new recovery facility out of town.  Not with the common addicts / alcoholics but at a real expensive, high speed / low drag place with private rooms and a bunch of country club like amenities. 

I know he hasn't hit bottom yet and his financial means keeps him out of legal hot water and in the lap of luxury.  I've spoken with him about his problems and he's been honest about his addiction and the problems it causes. It just seems to me that he's not really ready to overcome his personal demons and addiction issues. 

I know you guys battle every day and I'm proud of y'all for it.  As a concerned, regarded BIL, do you have any advice on how to communicate and show better support?

Doesn't sound like you are doing anything wrong.  You're dead right that he's being enabled.  You're also dead right that he hasn't hit his bottom.

Honestly, his family should have refused to take him back every time he left early.  That would probably be a good limitation this time around.

Because he seems to be sincere and at times honest, he's probably getting some clarity in treatment and convincing himself that his problem isn't as bad as initially thought.  The "I've got this" syndrome, a/k/a the "pink cloud."  Then life kicks back in and boom, face down in the gutter.  Very common, very predictable. 

That cycle can be its own bottom, along with whatever happens when he relapses.  It has been my experience that in those sober/drinking cycles, consequences come fast and hard.  And because the alky has a "taste" of sobriety, the impact of the consequences sometimes is greater than it might be otherwise.

But the general advice is to quit covering for him and detach.  Good luck with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speak of his problems,  but speak more of a life he can have if he maintains his sobriety.  One thing after another happens, good things, usually not great things, but good things, and if he's been where a lot of us have been, those good things feel great. Talk to him about a healthy life, one filled with promise and positivity. We all have that good life in us, a lot of us just cant comprehend that it exists, we have to step out to experience it. 

After that, if he wants to continue the routine of drying out in jail, you'll be there when he wants to get right and stay right. As said, detach with love, let him know the promise of life is out there and have faith he'll turn it around. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/8/2019 at 9:24 AM, Dewey said:

After that, if he wants to continue the routine of drying out in jail,

or if he wants to switch it up a bit and try it in an ER bed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SwanderedTalent said:
On 12/8/2019 at 9:24 AM, Dewey said:

After that, if he wants to continue the routine of drying out in jail,

or if he wants to switch it up a bit and try it in an ER bed!

Shoot for the trifecta and try the psych ward! Some of us need that extra level of demoralization to realize that we might actually need divine help. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I figure I owe it to the drunk mafia who've put up with my shit all these years to at least provide an update on my situation here at casa Diablo. @Augustus put me in touch with a friend of his who passed my info along to some local folks and I met with one of them back in October. They got my records from my docs and took their good old time reviewing them but last Thursday they concluded that yes, I am in fact as blind as a bat and therefore eligible for some assistance. To celebrate being pronounced legally blind I have been masturbating feverishly ever since. What the hell, right? ;) Anyway, wheels are turning, the world didn't come to a stop and a drink has never once crossed my mind today. I'll worry about tomorrow when it gets here. Soldier on, happy trudgers! Thanks for all of your love and support.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of you may remember a couple of years ago when I posted about having a hard time moderating my drinking in certain circumstances - basically, when I hit a certain level of intoxication, I was going to put the pedal to the metal and get shithammered. Not always a huge problem, but on the occasions where I really shot the moon, I sometimes had some apologizing to do. 

Anyway, I posted here and got some very helpful advice and useful perspective on things. Someone tipped me to the Sinclair Method, and I decided to give it a shot. 

I ended up having to see a different doctor than my usual GP just due to scheduling, but I was able to make my case and explain it to him to the point that he was willing to write me the prescription even though he hadn't ever heard of such a thing. 

I used it mostly to good success over a couple of months (with the lone exception of its usefulness and effectiveness being the time I also mixed in some pot). 

I ended up getting diagnosed with atrial fibrillation about two months into the experiment, and I was told that my drinking likely played a role in it. 

I stopped drinking more easily than I feared it might be. I am fairly confident that the few months of "erasing the pleasure pathways" in my brain in the lead up probably helped quite a bit. I wasn't quite sure what I was going to learn, but I am pleased to say that I haven't had a drop since, and I miss it much less than I thought I would. I do count myself as having dodged a bullet - it was in the back of my mind that perhaps I might not be able to hang it up so easily. 

Anyway, I just tried to get a life insurance policy and the online quote/policy match outfit I used eventually dinged me for "having been diagnosed with excessive drinking" and said that none of their carriers would touch me for a minimum of five years after the diagnosis. 

I hate to divert the thread any more than I have, but does anyone have any ideas, suggestions, advice, or experience with this situation?

Please feel free to PM rather than shit up the thread. 

Thanks, and keep on keepin' on... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my opinion the entire point of this thread is for it to be shitted-up (shat-up?) with advice.  I have none for you, but I am really glad that you're doing so well.  Good news in the morning Surly read.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right on - thanks! 

Unless anyone has a better idea, I think we're probably just going to freeball it for another three years or so and just put the money we had budgeted for premiums into other investments instead.  And I'll try not to croak in the meantime! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, El Diablo said:

I figure I owe it to the drunk mafia who've put up with my shit all these years to at least provide an update on my situation here at casa Diablo. @Augustus put me in touch with a friend of his who passed my info along to some local folks and I met with one of them back in October. They got my records from my docs and took their good old time reviewing them but last Thursday they concluded that yes, I am in fact as blind as a bat and therefore eligible for some assistance. To celebrate being pronounced legally blind I have been masturbating feverishly ever since. What the hell, right? ;) Anyway, wheels are turning, the world didn't come to a stop and a drink has never once crossed my mind today. I'll worry about tomorrow when it gets here. Soldier on, happy trudgers! Thanks for all of your love and support.

Glad to hear they finally got back to you.

God Bless

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Augustus said:

Glad to hear they finally got back to you.

God Bless

Thanks man. Things are going well. Your friend and I exchanged texts a couple weeks back one Saturday, they were just checking up on me. On a football Saturday. Go figure. ;) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, JohnnyRage said:

Without clicking or reading, I'm going to guess that a) this wasn't anywhere near the first time he'd driven his UPS truck drunk, and b) it was fun or "fun-ish" for him drinking on the job for a while, he felt like he was getting away with something and it felt super smart to have solved that annoying problem of needing to be sober for long stretches of daylight. It was probably pretty mellow for a time, cruising in his UPS truck with a nice buzz, then going home after shift and getting hammered until he passed out. 

There's a lot of different ways the "control" slips on you. When you stop being able to drink without getting completely drunk, and when you stop being able to wait to drink until say sundown or something like that-- it's amazing you can still argue with yourself that some aspect of it's under control. You pick up a drink at 10:30 in the morning, then you pick yourself up off the floor at 6 PM-- hard to believe we'll still insist it's somehow under control.

But enough about my drinking.

Sober today and grateful for this program. Things happen, they might suck, but I have a program I can work that helps me deal with the suckage and either accept it or change it if I can, and to avoid spinning my wheels changing stuff I need to accept and vice versa.

Nice day to be alive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...