Jump to content

Collecting Militaria


Recommended Posts

46 minutes ago, Onboard 2.0 said:

The button collection is really special. That pic is a small piece of about 3 cases of a really beautiful collection of dug buttons. There's also a collection of assorted uniform accoutrement, company letters, pins, badges, memorial emblems, etc.  

Maybe the coolest piece is a revolver with silver plated pistol grip, and the Union officers name inscribed along the spine. (I've got an image of him during the war).  He lost it at the battle of Malvern Hill.

He died of his wounds in Louisiana. As he lay dying on the battlefield he gave his officers sword to a sergeant with instructions it was to be set home to his family.  I'm trying to get the sword from a collector now.  Knowing the Provenance of a piece always makes it much more fascinating.

Wow, that's pretty sweet.  If you could get that, I'd have a whole room dedicated to the items.  Those minie'-balls as especially impressive when you read up on their origin and how they impacted tactics in the war.  They were the true ancestor of all modern, stabilized bullets

Using Napoleonic tactics of clustered soldiers firing in unison due to the inaccurate round musket balls, firing and advancing in step - entire ranks of soldiers were mowed down by a new bullet that had a concave base, that would seal and stabilize down the rifle bore and was effective out to 500+ yards; while round musket balls were closer to 100+ because; like a baseball - would pitch and yaw in the air.  Soft lead, also flattened upon impact to devastating effect.  Weighing almost 500 grains...that's the equivalent of soldiers marching headlong into ranks firing at them with 45-70s.  Such madness.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, BabaYaga said:

Wow, that's pretty sweet.  If you could get that, I'd have a whole room dedicated to the items.  Those minie'-balls as especially impressive when you read up on their origin and how they impacted tactics in the war.  They were the true ancestor of all modern, stabilized bullets

Using Napoleonic tactics of clustered soldiers firing in unison due to the inaccurate round musket balls, firing and advancing in step - entire ranks of soldiers were mowed down by a new bullet that had a concave base, that would seal and stabilize down the rifle bore and was effective out to 500+ yards; while round musket balls were closer to 100+ because; like a baseball - would pitch and yaw in the air.  Soft lead, also flattened upon impact to devastating effect.  Weighing almost 500 grains...that's the equivalent of soldiers marching headlong into ranks firing at them with 45-70s.  Such madness.  

Yeah, getting shot by a .58 cal Springfield (or any of the CW rifles was a devastating thing).  I had one years ago, and it kicked like a bitch when fired. The first modern war by many accounts. Land mines, trench warfare, rifled barrels, and 18th century medical technology all combined for horrific results.

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Onboard 2.0 said:

Yeah, getting shot by a .58 cal Springfield (or any of the CW rifles was a devastating thing).  I had one years ago, and it kicked like a bitch when fired. The first modern war by many accounts. Land mines, trench warfare, rifled barrels, and 18th century medical technology all combined for horrific results.

The submarine.  Armored ships.  The Gatling gun.  Aerial recon.  The telegraph wire used as a battlefield advancement.  Ambulance corps.  So much more.  

Europe watched closely, many intimating it set the stage for the WWI tactics, that again, were outpaced by technological advances to devastating effect.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, BabaYaga said:

The submarine.  Armored ships.  The Gatling gun.  Aerial recon.  The telegraph wire used as a battlefield advancement.  Ambulance corps.  So much more.  

Europe watched closely, many intimating it set the stage for the WWI tactics, that again, were outpaced by technological advances to devastating effect.  

Yep all true, but I thought the submarine was an earlier invention ?  

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I haven't seen a confirmation of this, but I've read in a couple of places that some obscure line in the most recent stimulus package will allow Korean lend-lease M1 carbines to be imported again.    Could be bullshit, but the market could certainly absorb more supply based on the demand at this point.  Prices have gone nuts on those suckers.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I have been doing a bit of re-arranging and updating my inventory recording of my collection and thought I would share a few new photos.

Stairwell leading up to War Room #1.  All of the pics on the walls are period photos, ads out of Life Magazine, or other period ephemera.  There are a couple of recent photos of WW2 sites that I visited.

IMG_8345.thumb.JPG.1579fdbe8263e02a2ed1d66572a3cae5.JPGIMG_8346.thumb.JPG.22c1df40a7ef58a1905552eccf236e99.JPGIMG_8347.thumb.JPG.de8be3403dc8f46cb44b88be4634291c.JPG

War Room #1.  This mainly my "smalls room".  Headgear, patches, pics, books, medals, field gear, patches, etc.

IMG_8348.thumb.JPG.27d25fb5648ec8ae63d08974ac7651e4.JPGIMG_8349.thumb.JPG.3e77014fdb814e03727ec53df54e20fa.JPGIMG_8350.thumb.JPG.010ba96405346e7a1aadd341699ba02e.JPGIMG_8351.thumb.JPG.54c727e8f39278924d6b057118a478a9.JPGIMG_8352.thumb.JPG.8cd7c3d7c4ea5aa707639e4e4185a202.JPGIMG_8353.thumb.JPG.c460c0d70b824017649adcd7565c6a3a.JPG

War Room #2 (Uniform Room)

IMG_8354.thumb.JPG.2ed5aef2bde6310ed99e651eae84520b.JPGIMG_8355.thumb.JPG.34037ccc587a48d120cc8d2080739881.JPGIMG_8356.thumb.JPG.d68efd4619e6b468d08863821f8f2f89.JPGIMG_8357.thumb.JPG.fbbb7386e3b56be1870182ace9aabead.JPG

  • Hook 'Em 5
  • Fuck Around and Find Out 1
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, baboso said:

I'm going to go out on a limb here and guess you aren't married.

Correct.  Was for almost 30 years.  However, the house was designed to accommodate my collection.  The hallway and upstairs room were approved by her at the time as a space for my collection.  I spread it out to the other room post-divorce.

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

@mininghorn88 Did you buy out Colonel Bubbies in Galveston when they went out of business?

On a serious note, all of those unit photos - if any of them can be tied to actual units and/or dates, if you're willing to scan them in, or at least take sharp photos of them, I could get copies to various genealogy/military research sites so relatives might come across them, or at least get you in touch with them.  @Hornius Emeritus could probably help a bit (probably more than me).

I was lucky enough that somebody had a battalion photo of one of my great-grandfathers from 1919 and put the photo online (the site was focused on the unit's history from 1919 up through the 1970s).  While they didn't have the names of those in the photo, as soon as I found the photo while researching his unit, I was able to pick him out immediately.  Had one of his daughters look through a print of the the photo that I made and she picked him out as well.  We had a photo of his battery with names of the soldiers, and were able to provide the guy running the site with some of the names of those in the battalion from that photo.

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, atomheartbevo said:

@mininghorn88 Did you buy out Colonel Bubbies in Galveston when they went out of business?

On a serious note, all of those unit photos - if any of them can be tied to actual units and/or dates, if you're willing to scan them in, or at least take sharp photos of them, I could get copies to various genealogy/military research sites so relatives might come across them, or at least get you in touch with them.  @Hornius Emeritus could probably help a bit (probably more than me).

I was lucky enough that somebody had a battalion photo of one of my great-grandfathers from 1919 and put the photo online (the site was focused on the unit's history from 1919 up through the 1970s).  While they didn't have the names of those in the photo, as soon as I found the photo while researching his unit, I was able to pick him out immediately.  Had one of his daughters look through a print of the the photo that I made and she picked him out as well.  We had a photo of his battery with names of the soldiers, and were able to provide the guy running the site with some of the names of those in the battalion from that photo.

I am never so lucky to buy stuff at a bargain such as a going out of business sale!

Most of the unit photos do have the unit info and date. Some have info written on the back 

As time allows I could get them scanned or at least take a nice photo of the written info as a starter.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is not a photoshop.  This is the story as I remember it being told by the guy in the middle. (Facts be damned)

The first meeting of Roosevelt and Churchill in Aug 1941 (Before Pearl Harbor) was supposed to be a secret meeting so Roosevelt did not have a photographer travel with him.  Either once they got there or just before Roosevelt arrived at the meeting off the coast of Newfoundland he learned that the Brits had a photographer to document the meeting so he asked his party to get a photographer too.  Apparently Roosevelt's son was an Army officer and spoke up that he knew a guy.  So he connected with his buddy to fly out in a sea plane to their location and bring his camera gear. Once he had taken pictures of all the senior officers and others at the meeting Roosevelt motioned to the cameraman to come and pose for a picture while the two leaders continued to talk so he gave the camera to the President's son.  I was told that in most of the photos they are looking at each other in conversation. In this one you will see that they both looked at the camera.

The guy that flew out to take the pictures is my step Grandfather.  Retired as a full Colonel in the USAF and served through WWII, Korea, and early Vietnam.  In my family we call this picture the Big Three.

In the spirit of an old Texas-OU joke here is a bonus.  My stepfather was also a Colonel in the USAF and he threw a staff party at our house for his command.  This picture was hanging in the hallway and a LT stopped and looked at it then said to my stepfather, "Colonel, I recognize you in the picture but who are the other two?"

The Big Three.jpg

Cool article on the meeting:  https://www.politico.com/story/2017/08/09/churchill-fdr-meet-off-newfoundland-aug-9-1941-241372

Edited by TexasEd
  • Hook 'Em 3
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, TexasEd said:

This is not a photoshop.  This is the story as I remember it being told by the guy in the middle. (Facts be damned)

The first meeting of Roosevelt and Churchill in Aug 1941 (Before Pearl Harbor) was supposed to be a secret meeting so Roosevelt did not have a photographer travel with him.  Either once they got there or just before Roosevelt arrived at the meeting off the coast of Newfoundland he learned that the Brits had a photographer to document the meeting so he asked his party to get a photographer too.  Apparently Roosevelt's son was an Army officer and spoke up that he knew a guy.  So he connected with his buddy to fly out in a sea plane to their location and bring his camera gear. Once he had taken pictures of all the senior officers and others at the meeting Roosevelt motioned to the cameraman to come and pose for a picture while the two leaders continued to talk so he gave the camera to the President's son.  I was told that in most of the photos they are looking at each other in conversation. In this one you will see that they both looked at the camera.

The guy that flew out to take the pictures is my step Grandfather.  Retired as a full Colonel in the USAF and served through WWII, Korea, and early Vietnam.  In my family we call this picture the Big Three.

In the spirit of an old Texas-OU joke here is a bonus.  My stepfather was also a Colonel in the USAF and he threw a staff party at our house for his command.  This picture was hanging in the hallway and a LT stopped and looked at it then said to my stepfather, "Colonel, I recognize you in the picture but who are the other two?"

The Big Three.jpg

Very cool story and picture.  Keep the story alive.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really a collector per se, but I am the current steward of an heirloom sword from the Civil War made by Tiffany. Decorative etchings still cling to the blade. The more remarkable part to me is the paper document that has survived along with the sword: signed and sealed by the governor, memorializing my ancestor's induction into the 123rd NY infantry. As I kid I wanted to play with the sword of course. Now it's just humbling to behold.

  • Hook 'Em 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, mininghorn88 said:

Back story please. Based upon the PH ribbon he received multiple wounds.

Great grouping.

Yes. My father was wounded 3 times. The last time was a  very serious wound in hand to hand combat. Only 3 men survived in his Company from D-Day until VE-Day. 

 

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

√ó
√ó
  • Create New...