Jump to content

Puerto Rico


ckhorn

Recommended Posts

Has anyone visited the Island recently. How is the clean up coming along. Don't trust the media or drive byes. Let me know what it is like. This will be the 1st year in Five that we have not visited. Have a lot of in-laws there, but they complained how bad it was before Maria.

Also, any word on the shape Vieques or Culebra.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pretty thorough article about Vieques from the NYTimes:

 

Returning to Vieques This lush, wild bit of Puerto Rico, a word­ of­ mouth destination that draws a loyal following of visitors, is rebuilding after last year’s ferocious hurricane season. By JAN BENZEL MARCH 19, 2018 

 
Hurricanes Irma and Maria devastated islands in the Caribbean last September. Six months later, how are they recovering? To find out, writers for Travel spent time inVieques (below), St. Martin, St. John, Dominica and San Juan (coming tomorrow). The ceiling fan spun lazily overhead. I’d fallen asleep to the tiny tree frogs’ lullaby and awakened to distant cock­a­doodle­doos. Dishes rattled invitingly in the open­air dining space outside my door, promising hot coffee and an omelet. The fan, the eggs, the hot shower, the full tank of gas, the working A.T.M. on Main Street in Isabel Segunda, the twinkling string of lights along the MalecĂłn in the tiny town of Esperanza, even the coquĂ­s, those little tree frogs: After the storms, no one on Vieques takes those things for granted. Slammed in September by Hurricanes Irma and Maria, this lush, wild bit of Puerto Rico, eight miles east of the main island, is still recovering. Winds that howled at well over 100 miles an hour hurled roofs, cars and boats, denuded trees and smashed windows. Pounding rains poured through ceilings. For weeks there was no water. For much longer, no electricity. Nearly six months later,Vieques, population about 9,000, is welcoming visitors again. Power is still spotty, largely dependent on generators. Beaches and roads have been cleared. Internet and cell service are back, intermittently. Some restaurants and hotels remain shutteredÍŸ others are housing and feeding, along with vacationers, workers who’ve come to repair the power grid. Residents compare notes on insurance claims (agonizingly slow to be paid) and the recovery, sharing cautious hope that although the high season for tourism — the prime driver of Vieques’s economy — may be lost this year, the island will rebuild and be stronger for it. Signs are positive. The trickle of vacationers is increasing, led by loyal visitors who fell in love with Vieques the moment they stepped off the slow ferry or quick tiny plane you take to get here. I’m in that camp. This is not your fancy, umbrella­drink­served­poolside Caribbean island.
 
Getting dressed up means putting on a clean T­shirt and brushing the sand off your flipflops. Isabel Segunda, the bigger of the island’s two towns, is a patchwork of gaily painted Spanish Colonial stucco buildings in various stages of dilapidation. Wild horses roam so freely that drivers have to wait for them to amble off the roads. And then there are the island’s jewels: palm­fringed, soft­sand beaches, stretches of which you may well have all to yourself. I first went in 2015 and returned the next year. In early February, my seatmate on the puddle­jumper from San Juan was a doctor from Florida taking part in a medical mission. In 25 minutes we touched down on the small runway, and glided past the wreckage of a couple of small planes, crumpled in the storms. The airport buzzed with FEMA workers, greeted warmly by Viequenses, many of whom are still angry at and skeptical of the United States government after its slow response, but who have embraced the responders. I picked up a Jeep at Maritza’s Car Rental and checked in at the Hacienda Tamarindo, a quirky inn up the hill from Esperanza where I’d stayed twice before. The proprietors, Burr and Linda Vail, chose Vieques for a second act 22 years ago after selling their Vermont restaurant business. Their hotel is a New England­Caribbean hybrid of earth­toned Mexican tiles, tropical colors and folk art, with a lovely swimming pool and a grand sea view. The hotel and grounds, a bit battered, were as welcoming as ever. A huge tamarind tree grows up through the inn’s center and an English sheepdog lounges in the shade. 
 
In Esperanza — where, pre­hurricanes, visitors, transplants and Viequenses strolled seaside, joking, drinking, eating and listening to music at open­air restaurants — only a few establishments have opened. The pretty white­and­coral cement railing along the walkway had been smashed. But the mood remained lively. Now the drumbeat is the hammering of repair work. Locals in frayed T­shirts and dreadlocks rubbed shoulders with people who’d arrived on dinghies from sailboats bobbing in deeper water, and a few other visitors from colder climates. The first one I met, Stephen, from Atlanta, had been a regular visitor since 2000. “I’ve always thought of Vieques as ‘my’ island,” said Stephen, who was making his second visit since the storms. He’d discovered it when he was living in Boston and spotted a cheap flight to San Juan. “My copy of ‘Let’s Go’ suggested Vieques as a pretty good day trip. So I left my rental car on the ferry dock in Fajardo, figuring I’d be back that night. I ended up staying the whole week.” Others lured by Vieques’s beauty, lack of pretension and low cost of living, have lived here for decades: In my short stay I ran into a museum director, an academic, artists, a retired nurse and a couple from Colorado, Norm and Deb, who had retired early and moved to the island sight unseen to live, as they put it, “on purpose.” Stephen was staying at El Blok, a Brutalist­style cement hotel at one end of the Malecón. When it opened in 2014 it was hailed as hip, chic and a little fancy, with a menu created by a famous chef — something of an anomaly onVieques. Now the building has a plywood facade painted with the slogan “Vieques Se Levanta” — Vieques Will Rise. Workers head to the bar after sunset, and the vibe is friendly and a little raucous. A local chef turns out delicious dishes from a mesquite grill. Prices, like those at many places, have been lowered. Burr and I ate there one night, sharing the dining room with electrical workers, visiting doctors and Mark Martin­Bras, who works with the Vieques Conservation and Historic Trust and ViequesLove, a GoFundMe organization that has been a galvanizing force for the recovery. There were also some vacationers, including a couple with a baby, first­timers on the island. Diners flowed from table to table as if they were at a party. 3/19/2018 
 
“If you take the long view, Vieques will end up better off,” said Mr. Martin­Bras, a biologist who came to work at the Bioluminescent Bay, the ecological marvel that draws visitors from all over the world. “The infrastructure will be stronger. We were on the cusp of a tourism boomÍŸ there was the W Hotel, there was talk of cruise ships. Would that be good for the island, or the appeal of the island? Probably not. So now that we have the essentials covered — there’s food in the supermarkets, beer in the bars, music in the streets — we have a chance to create tourism that’s more community­oriented, more nature­oriented, that can preserve and conserve the island, that’s more sustainable.” The trust’s base, a tidy museum in Esperanza that houses nature and history exhibits has reopened. The W Hotel, with 156 rooms the island’s biggest hotel, has not. Its formerly manicured grounds remain gatedÍŸ a spokeswoman for Starwood, which owns the W, said the reopening date was “up in the air,” and depended on when the power grid was restored so that repair work could be undertaken. Its closing represents a significant loss of jobs and revenue. Tourism accounts for 65 percent or more of the economy, according to Bob Gevinski, a board member of the Puerto Rico Hotel and Tourism Association and manager of the Hix Island House on Vieques. The Bio Bay has suffered, too. On an earlier trip I had paddled it at night, plankton glowing magically as I let my hands drift through the water or a fish waggled by. I’d planned this trip to coincide with a moonless sky — the best time to see the glow — and had corresponded with BlackBeard Sports to line up a Bio Bay excursion, or perhaps snorkel or bicycle to the sugar industry ruins in the island’s interior. But conditions were uncharacteristically windy for those activities, and the Bio Bay, the outfitters said, was glowing only at about “2 on a scale of 10.” The mangroves that surround it and nurture the sea life have not yet recovered. So a guide, Regalado MirĂł, and I roamed the island in a van. He pointed out relics of Vieques’s richest days, when Europe couldn’t get enough of the sugar the island produced: a decrepit pier near Esperanza and a rusted 19th­century railway engine that had hauled the sugar cane.
 
7 Next we passed an old military truck, a reminder of the decades beginning with World War II when the United States Navy had used the island for bombing practice. After a Viequense was killed by an errant bomb, Rega took part in protests beginning in 2000 against the Navy’s presence. The environmental lawyer Robert Kennedy Jr., the activists Al Sharpton and Dennis Rivera and the actor Edward James Olmos, among others, joined the cause. Rega took Mr. Kennedy scuba diving to see the effects of bombing practice on the reefs. “Three feet underwater was a junkyard,” Mr. Kennedy recalled during a phone conversation. “There were dozens of sunken ships and hundreds of bombs filled with toxic material.” Mr. Kennedy represented Viequesin a suit against the naval presence and later took part in a protest that landed him in a Puerto Rican prison. The efforts led to the Navy’s departure in 2003. The areas used for bombing practice were designated a Superfund site, and a National Wildlife Refuge. Now beachgoers can poke along dirt roads until they find a spot that suits — gentle waters in coves, waves breaking on rocky cliffs and caves, palm­shaded sand or prime sunset­watching. Elsewhere on the island, Rega and I checked on a huge, gnarled, 300­year­old ceiba tree, sacred to Viequenses. We visited a honeybee farm, La Finca Consciencia, crucial to pollination, and the Tin Box, a funky barbecue joint whose architecture lives up to its name. It hadn’t yet reopened, but rows of arugula, banana trees, avocado trees, cherry tomatoes, cilantro and lemongrass were growing in the garden. Back in Isabel, the lights were out at BlackBeard Sports, but the door was open, and there were even a few customers. Many of the businesses whose buildings were sound enough to open have done so. Owners want employees to have paychecks, even if limited, and open doors boost morale, they say. At the Siddhia Hutchinson Glen Wielgus Gallery, Ms. Hutchinson was leading a workshop in collage­making, while Mr. Wielgus straightened paintings, prints, sculpture and jewelry. Around the corner at El Sombrero Viejo, a lively, weathered bar, locals stopped in to charge up cellphones and maybe drink a cold Modelo. In Esperanza Eva Bolivar had not yet reopened her restaurant, Bili, but she has delivered some 64,000 meals to people in need.
 
Other Esperanza mainstays are also still closed, including Tradewinds, an inn and restaurantÍŸ Lazy Jack’s, a hostel frequented by backpackers and college studentsÍŸ and El Quenepo, a restaurant with dishes you’d count yourself fortunate to find in New York. Stephen and I took a taxi to Isabel one night for tacos and margaritas at Coqui Fire. We joined Douglas, a lawyer from Boston, and his client, a developer whose vacation house had been damaged in the storm. When the generator hiccupped and the lights went out, there was barely a shrugÍŸ when it came back on there was applause. Another night the four of us — and, in a Fellini­esque moment, just about everyone else I’d met walking Sun Bay Beach or strolling in Isabel — ended up at Bananas, a casual place serving tropical drinks and catch­of­the day dinners. A group of Viequenses played dominoes at a tiled table. El Blok had no power that day. Nor did Hacienda Tamarindo. “We’re definitely glamping now,” Douglas said, “minus the coffee and the hot shower.” The permanent power supply won’t be back for at least two years, a representative of the Army Corps of Engineers staying at the Tamarindo told me, explaining that the antiquated underwater cable from the main island was broken irreparably and that a new one would be installed. Until then the island would run on government­supplied generators. But in a place where sun is plentiful, solar energy is taking hold fast. Tesla installed solar panels and storage on Vieques and Culebra soon after the storms, fueling waste treatment plants and other key sites, including the hospital. Hix Island House, a sleek concrete complex designed by the Canadian architect John Hix, has opened its one solar­powered building.
 
Neeva Gayle Hix, the architect’s wife, gave me a tour, showing off units equipped with kitchens, the swimming pool and an open­air yoga space. “There was one gift this hurricane gave us,” she said. “So many plants and trees were destroyed, but you can see they’re all coming back,” she added, pointing out the new growth on a stand of whispering pines. “And look at what we have now.” The sweep of her arm took in a vast, glorious, unimpeded 180­degree view of green island and sparkling turquoise sea. A few weeks after I returned home, I checked in to see how things were going. Work on the power lines was continuing, Bob Gevinski said. Tourism had picked up noticeably. Bili and the Tin Box had reopened, and were serving full houses. Good news travels fast on an island that depends on it.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting. Too bad about the Bio Bay.

When we lived in San Juan, we visited Phosphorescent Bay on the south side a couple of times while driving around the island perimeter during summer vacations & to stay with friends who owned a plantation near Ponce.  Took a fantastic tour at night in a glass bottom boat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

I’d say Puerto Rico is an excellent covid travel option. Your negative test  has to be within 72 hours of your arrival in PR vs before returning from foreign countries. They ask you by text daily to report any symptoms and people wear masks most everywhere except on beach, but otherwise it’s beautiful Puerto Rico. 
 

CAC6-A3-BD-D3-EE-403-D-B8-F2-39-D5-B880-

And shout out to whichever Surly 1%er has the Longhorn golf cart At the Ritz Carlton Dorado Reserve. Good game, well played.

 

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/5/2018 at 6:15 PM, Armybrat said:

Thanks for posting. Too bad about the Bio Bay.

When we lived in San Juan, we visited Phosphorescent Bay on the south side a couple of times while driving around the island perimeter during summer vacations & to stay with friends who owned a plantation near Ponce.  Took a fantastic tour at night in a glass bottom boat.

Going to one of the bio bays tomorrow, not sure which one. Stopping in Luquillo on the way to eat and shop. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

51 minutes ago, GRHorn said:

Going to one of the bio bays tomorrow, not sure which one. Stopping in Luquillo on the way to eat and shop. 

When we were stationed in San Juan 70 years ago, there was almost nothing in Luquillo, and the beach was undeveloped. Our post (Fort Brooke) Boy Scout troop went camping on the beach there once in a while, also over to El Yunque rain forest.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Scooter Monzingo said:

No shit? We were stationed at Fort Buchanan in 54/55. Used to love fucking around El Moro as a kid. Lived a driver nine iron from the beach.

We were stationed at Fort Brooke in the grounds of El Morro (1950-54). Our quarters were in the treed area to the west (right) of the road running up to the fort. Those “modern” US buildings were all torn down after the post was deactivated in the late 1960s. We went to the school on the Navy air station. 

 

015EF75D-0272-4B4B-982B-81D7ED54CF8B.jpeg

  • Hook 'Em 2
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Armybrat said:

We were stationed at Fort Brooke in the grounds of El Morro (1950-54). Our quarters were in the treed area to the west (right) of the road running up to the fort. Those “modern” US buildings were all torn down after the post was deactivated in the late 1960s. We went to the school on the Navy air station. 

 

015EF75D-0272-4B4B-982B-81D7ED54CF8B.jpeg

Awesome. I have printed hundreds of shots from a similar 4x5 negative. My old man was a CID agent that pulled dual duty as the crime lab guy (I have no idea what his MOS was). Taught me how to use both a Leica and Speedgrahic while we were there.

I’m going to guess it was a good duty station for him, as all I seem to remember is a bunch of undercover CID agents sitting around drinking, whoring, and enjoying the sun. I don’t remember if I ever saw my dad in uniform while we were there. 
 

The fun didn’t last however. Our next station was Kegnew Station. If you don’t know it, Google that fucker. Man we ended up in some shit holes.

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, El Morro was my playground for almost 4 years (Dad got an extension for our tour). The 9 hole golf course on the post actually made a travelog and Mom was caught on film putting on the sand “greens”. We never saw the travelog, but one of my Dad’s friends was in Hong Kong (attache) a few years later, went to a theater there and saw his mom and mine up on the screen putting on that green. 😀 My brother made a hole in one on the short hole that doglegged over the little entrance bridge that led into the fortress proper when he was 13.

We moved to Jefferson Barracks in 1954 for 3 years. By that time all the post housing had been turned over to the city for public use. The National Guard retained control of the old HQ buildings & motor pools. Dad worked downtown as an advisor in a state NG building.

The main city sewage outlet to the River was right near the National Cemetery. It was untreated shit sewage that was very fragrant when the wind was wrong. Our old (former) officers quarters on Hancock Drive running by the parade ground were demolished in the 1970s, and the extensive wooded area behind our house pockmarked with big sinkholes was filled in a cleared. That was our playground.

In 1957 we were sent to Taipei, Taiwan for a 2 year tour in the MAAG group there. That was our last post before Dad retired to Austin.

St. Louis was on the decline when we got there, and a bunch of Mom’s cousins, longtime residents of the area, were looking to escape to the suburbs. Sure missed Puerto Rico... best assignment of all.

Edited by Armybrat
  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Armybrat said:

Yeah, El Morro was my playground for almost 4 years (Dad got an extension for our tour). The 9 hole golf course on the post actually made a travelog and Mom was caught on film putting on the sand “greens”. We never saw the travelog, but one of my Dad’s friends was in Hong Kong (attache) a few years later, went to a theater there and saw his mom and mine up on the screen putting on that green. 😀 My brother made a hole in one on the short hole that doglegged over the little entrance bridge that led into the fortress proper when he was 13.

We moved to Jefferson Barracks in 1954 for 3 years. By that time all the post housing had been turned over to the city for public use. The National Guard retained control of the old HQ buildings & motor pools. Dad worked downtown as an advisor in a state NG building.

The main city sewage outlet to the River was right near the National Cemetery. It was untreated shit sewage that was very fragrant when the wind was wrong. Our old (former) officers quarters on Hancock Drive running by the parade ground were demolished in the 1970s, and the extensive wooded area behind our house pockmarked with big sinkholes was filled in a cleared. That was our playground.

In 1957 we were sent to Taipei, Taiwan for a 2 year tour in the MAAG group there. That was our last post before Dad retired to Austin.

St. Louis was on the decline when we got there, and a bunch of Mom’s cousins, longtime residents of the area, were looking to escape to the suburbs. Sure missed Puerto Rico... best assignment of all.

Man I love sharing those stories. Next time I’m in Austin we got to get a beer, and a bourbon, on me..

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I'm headed to PR with my wife and one boy for his special birthday trip in a couple of weeks. I haven't been in a decade. Just curious if there are any other folks who have been since the big hurricane and if there are any kinds of insights associated to it or just the island that a traveler might want/need to know.

I have no clue where we're staying or what we're doing, but nothing expensive will scare me off so if there is a thing or a restaurant that is a must do besides visiting the rainforest and doing a bioluminescence trek, I'm all eyes and ears. Thanks for any help in advance, and I will pos rep any meaningful responses. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Go to Guavate and eat a shit ton of pork at Los Pinos.  Take the rest to go for a late night snack.  Grab a glass of mavi from some dude with questionable dental hygiene on the side of the road.  Grab a sixer of medalla and go find a place on the beach to go take a nap.  
 

Well that’s what I want to do right now, but it’s been a pretty shitty day at work.

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

For the apparently very few that might be interested in a trip to Puerto Rico, here are my cliff notes for future readers:

1) Corona-related requirements were minimal if you have a vax card and fill your stuff out online ahead of time.

2) The St. Regis is about 30 minutes from the airport and was about as nice as you could hope for and well worth the points we spent to stay there.

3) Don't do the fucking bioluminescent bay kayaking tour. It was a fucking beating and the payoff was minimal. By the time we got to the actual lagoon, it was clear that, short of a water nymph appearing and giving me a blowjob, it wasn't going to be worth it. There are like 7 kayaking companies that take 20 kayaks each and squeeze them single file and unaligned up-current through a canal to get there from the ocean bay. Nope. Fucking slow, dark, and miserable.

4) You need reservations to get into the rainforest, due to corona, which is fucking idiotic. 

5) I travel once a summer to Grand Cayman or Costa Rica for a long beach weekend with the kids and my wife. CR is way more wild and less expensive than either PR or GC. GC is way more expensive and cleaner and simpler than PR or CR. PR middles both and doesn't have a customs issue. It's a longer flight from Houston by an hour+ than either GC or CR. Given all of that, I'd prefer CR every time but I'm not the only decisionmaker involved. All 3 are good trips if planned right. I'll be in CR in August and can't wait.

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

i'm starting to look at putting together a trip for the husband's birthday in August, we'd probably travel in September.

i was trying to decide between Puerto Rico and Costa Rica...weighing the points you made @closetojumping...since this is a 'surprise' gift, Puerto Rico might be easiest for me to put together, i assume i won't even need his passport for booking. 

we've only ever been to Mexico and Jamaica, so i'm unfamiliar with other Caribbean islands honestly...i'm open to another island suggestion. anybody been to USVI?? is it more expensive?đŸ€”

we will definitely want easy/close access to a nice beach with accessible water (not rocky, etc.) - if we stay in San Juan/city center, are there nearby beaches?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/23/2021 at 8:00 PM, mchookem said:

took your advice, see that thread for an update!

You did what I’d do the next time we wanted to go to a relatively close island that is an American interest. Not that I wouldn’t visit PR again because I would, but the USVIs seem pretty interesting. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Bump. Going to be in San Juan for 4 nights in June. Probably staying somewhere in Condado.

Looking for any and all recs. We like to hike, so I'm guessing El Yunque is a must. Good restaurants in SJ? Worth renting a car to get out of SJ for that short of a trip?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, tokamak said:

Bump. Going to be in San Juan for 4 nights in June. Probably staying somewhere in Condado.

Looking for any and all recs. We like to hike, so I'm guessing El Yunque is a must. Good restaurants in SJ? Worth renting a car to get out of SJ for that short of a trip?

I would rent a car for El Yunque just to avoid being on everyone else’s schedule. Definitely recommend El Yunque and hiking it. There’s a lot of work in any hike there, so gear up. 

Regarding the food in SJ, the only thing I remember from that perspective is that the ropa vieja is delicious everywhere and mafongo is overrated trash. Hope this helps, since this thread is a surprising desert. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll chip in since this thread isn't getting much attention.

I would definitely take CTJ's rec and rent a car. I think the rest of Puerto Rico is prettier than San Juan. It's too bad you don't have a few more days. The islands and beaches south of SJ are the way to go. I used to go there with work and we'd sometimes take a plane ride to the Virgin Islands. You get to see the Caribbean/Atlantic split, it is something else. It's only a 15-mile plane ride away, but I don't think you have enough time for that. You may see if it is worth it to take a trip to Vieques or Culebra. It would be rushing things, but you should be able to pull it off. Get up early, drive to Roosevelt Road, and take the short ferry to the islands.

1 or 2 days in San Juan (forts, food, architecture, etc)

1 or 2 days on the islands,

1 day at El Yunque and back

One day, you could drive as far south as you can go and back. I've gone all the way down the coastline to Ponce checking out beaches and historical places and then came back late that night. 

If I only had four days, I think I would do this:

1 day in San Juan

1 day in El Yunque

2 days for Vieques/Culebra (some of the best beaches in the Caribbean!).  

You will still have nights in San Juan to possibly eat and walk around the city.

A couple of other possibilities:

cave tubing or ziplining. The cave tubing is an adventure! If that's your sort of thing, go for it. 

 

kayaking in the bioluminescent bay. There's one in a lagoon south of SJ and there's another on Vieques.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Without a doubt, San Juan and the rest of Puerto Rico are two very different things.

Food-wise, if you want fancy, go to 1919, RAYA, or Sage. Bottega for tapas/wine bar. People rave about Marmalade but I wasn't impressed.

Or drive inland to Bacoa, which despite being affordable is incredible. https://www.bbc.com/travel/article/20220215-is-americas-best-restaurant-in-puerto-rico

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Going to PR later this year. Staying near Yunque but definitely want to hit up Culebra and/or Vieques based on beach photos.

Question is what's the recommended transportation once there - are there golf cart rentals or other ways to get around the smaller islands?

Any recommended vendors, don't miss eating locations etc are appreciated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I posted on here about a trip years ago so grain of salt
 vieques get a jeep and go backroading to secluded beaches you’ll have to yourself. Just don’t hit any wild horses. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...