Jump to content
GreenspointTexas

OC Wish List

Recommended Posts

4 minutes ago, Pig Bellmont said:

Has anyone said Kellen Moore? Bc Garrett is getting fired and he may need a landing spot

Moore could be an oc in the nfl no?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, atomheartbevo said:

While the other reasons are good, I don't give a shit about where he graduated (same with Harrell) - Darrell K. Royal was a Sooner.

You've spelt "K" incorrectly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Pig Bellmont said:

Has anyone said Kellen Moore? Bc Garrett is getting fired and he may need a landing spot

We'd be happy with Helen Keller at this point.

And she'd be easier to track than Graham Harrell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, atomheartbevo said:

Fixed.  But don't mind being corrected by a Brit.

You've failed to train your phone properly.

No Brit. Native Texan. Fuck Brits (no offense, just intents).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, atomheartbevo said:

We'd be happy with Helen Keller at this point.

I heard she watched the same game tape for days and had a really good feel for it when it was over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok... Time to get creative.  Could this Brainiac be the next  Lincoln Riley or Joe Brady??  Charlie Weis Jr has a Photographic Memory...  Maybe Texas could find a spot on the Staff for him??

https://www.si.com/college/2018/08/20/charlie-weis-jr-age-florida-atlantic-lane-kiffin

 

Article --  August 2018

How Charlie Weis Jr., FAU's 25-Year-Old Offensive Coordinator, Earned Lane Kiffin's Trust

Charlie Weis Jr. is younger than any other coordinator in college football, but keep in mind that FAU's OC also started down this path—against the wishes of his father, the former Notre Dame and Kansas head coach—earlier than almost all of his peers.

BOCA RATON, Fla. — When Lane Kiffin was the offensive coordinator at Alabama in 2015, he interviewed a recent college grad who had done his undergraduate work at Florida and Kansas. Charlie Weis Jr., the son of the former Notre Dame and Kansas coach, sought an analyst job with the Crimson Tide, and Kiffin had been told the kid had a photographic memory.So during the interview, Kiffin handed Weis his driver’s license and his credit card. You can have these for three minutes, Kiffin recalled telling Weis. Then I’ll take them back and start asking questions. After the allotted time ended, Kiffin took back the cards and started the test.

What street do I live on?

Weis answered correctly. He correctly recited various facts gleaned from the two cards. The next day, Kiffin decided to test the job candidate’s retention.

What’s the expiration date on my credit card?

Weis answered correctly. If he didn’t already have the job, that cinched it.

Weis and Kiffin spent two seasons together in Tuscaloosa. Well, most of two seasons.   Kiffin jokes that they were 28–1 together and 0–1 apart. This year, they’re back together with different job titles. Kiffin is the second-year head coach at Florida Atlantic, leading a team that went 11–3 and won Conference USA last season. Weis, who turned 25 in April, is the offensive coordinator. “Sometimes it’s crazy to think about,” Weis said Sunday.

Weis doesn’t think about it too often, though. He’s too busy for introspection. A night earlier, Kiffin and Weis had led the FAU offense through its most important scrimmage of the preseason. They’re trying to winnow down a quarterback race that features three transfer quarterbacks competing to take the job abdicated by 2017 starter Jason Driskel, who opted to retire from football in January and who obtained a civil engineering degree in May. In less than two weeks, the Owls will open the season at Oklahoma. They haven’t trailed in a game since October, but they haven’t been challenged the way they will by the three-time defending Big 12 champ.

Whether former Sooner Chris Robison, former Florida State Seminole DeAndre Johnson or former Arkansas Razorback/SMU Mustang Rafe Peavey will win the job is a hot topic on campus, but an even more intriguing question is this: Which son of a famous football coach will call the plays? Will it be Kiffin—the son of legendary NFL defensive coordinator Monte—or Weis? Weis, asked what percentage of plays he called in Saturday’s scrimmage, deferred. “That’s up to coach Kiffin to talk about,” he said. “It’s not my place.” Kiffin didn’t give a direct answer either, and both men discussed a collaborative effort.

Their collaboration at Alabama worked beautifully for the Crimson Tide. Kiffin designed the game plans with help from Weis, whose memory and attention to detail allowed him to find vulnerabilities in defenses that Kiffin could exploit on gameday. If the Owls can now combine Kiffin’s ability to spot potential huge plays in-game with Weis’s thorough prep and instant recall, the offense should be as good or better than the one that put up 6.8 yards a play and 40.6 points a game last season. That recall, Kiffin believes, will give FAU the equivalent of the photos that we see NFL quarterbacks thumbing through on the sidelines during games. Such photos aren’t allowed in college football, but there is no rule against a coach taking one in his head. Kiffin had an idea Weis could do that when, during his Alabama interview, Weis rattled off all 11 jersey numbers for the starting defense of a team he’d scouted earlier. After working so closely with Weis in ’15 and ’16, Kiffin is sure of it.

Weis was sure he wanted to be a coach when he was still a student at St. Joseph High in South Bend, Ind. He didn’t play there, either. He helped break down video at his school, and he also helped defensive coaches signal for his dad’s team. This lack of between-the-lines experience may seem like a disadvantage, but think about the list of excellent players who became excellent coaches. Steve Spurrier won a Heisman Trophy as a player and a national title as a coach. Mike Gundy started at quarterback for the program he now runs. Pat Fitzgerald starred at linebacker for the program he runs. But for the most part, the best coaches were average or below-average players. Kiffin, who was a reserve quarterback at Fresno State before transitioning into coaching while still an undergraduate, points out that while everyone else was playing, Weis was learning how to coach. So he’s got the same experience at 25 as a 30-year-old who played college and then started coaching. “I’m very similar in age to a lot of these guys, but starting coaching from 18 years old, I feel like I committed my life to that early on,” Weis said. “I wasn’t doing other things when I was in college. I was always around the building.”

This is not what Weis’s parents wanted for him. “They said ‘No, no, no’ from the second I decided to do it,” he said. Charlie Sr. helped win Super Bowls as Bill Belichick’s offensive coordinator in New England. He then made a fortune as the head coach at Notre Dame, the offensive coordinator at Florida and then the head coach at Kansas. But the elder Weis also got ripped mercilessly for a lack of success in his later years in South Bend and for the contract then-Notre Dame athletic director Kevin White* gave him that resulted in nearly $19 million in buyout payments between 2009 and ’16. While Notre Dame was still paying the elder Weis, he got hired and fired by Kansas and left the program in a hole out of which it has yet to crawl. But the criticism of the elder Weis wasn’t always limited to wins and losses. He was routinely skewered for his weight and his appearance.

*In March, Kevin White’s son Brian was named the AD at FAU. He is now the boss of Kiffin and the younger Weis.

Charlie Jr. has a unique look, but it’s only because he’s the only one on the Owls’ staff—which also includes 26-year-old strength coach Wilson Love—who looks even younger than his players. “Some people on the defensive side thought he was a player,” tight end Harrison Bryant said of the younger Weis’s first few days on campus. “But the first time we met him, you could tell he knows so much about the game.” Tailback Devin “Motor” Singletary, who ran for 32 touchdowns last season, said Weis communicates so easily with the players because of his age. “He’s like an older brother in a way,” Singletary said.

After graduating high school, the younger Weis followed his dad to Florida, where Charlie Sr. had been hired to run the offense for first-year coach Will Muschamp. Charlie Jr. was placed “on the bottom of the pile.” Those analysts and quality control guys who assist the assistant coaches? Weis was their assistant. He wrote up film breakdowns. He made play cards the graduate assistants could show to the scout team. When the elder Weis got the Kansas job, Charlie Jr. went to Lawrence with him. The work remained menial. After his father was fired, Charlie Jr. headed to Tuscaloosa for a date with Kiffin’s credit card. Charlie Jr. had originally planned to join Kiffin at FAU as the tight ends coach, and he spent time on the staff when last year’s offensive coordinator Kendal Briles was installing the scheme, but Weis was offered a job as an analyst for Atlanta Falcons offensive coordinator—and Kiffin compatriot—Steve Sarkisian. When Briles left for Houston after last season, Kiffin hired Weis again.

There will be times when the older brother must hand down discipline, but Weis understands he’ll need to have difficult conversations with his players. Kiffin, who first became an offensive coordinator at USC at 29 and first became a head coach when the Oakland Raiders hired him at 31, believes Weis will handle those duties better than he would have at that age. “I’m trying to help him not make some mistakes that I made. But he’ll be fine,” Kiffin said. “He’s a lot more balanced than I was at that age and more mature. We do talk about that, but I don’t think he’s going to have issues.”

If Weis is indeed as mature as Kiffin suggests, this could be like the relationship between then-Texas Tech coach Mike Leach and young receivers coach Lincoln Riley, who acted like a 40-year-old when he was 23. When Leach was fired by Texas Tech before the Alamo Bowl following the 2009 season, a 26-year-old Riley called the offensive plays for interim coach Ruffin McNeill. McNeill then took Riley with him to East Carolina, making Riley an offensive coordinator at that age. Last year, Riley took over the Sooners at 33 after serving as their offensive coordinator for two seasons. In 2017, he turned 34, won the Big 12 and made the College Football Playoff. On Sept. 1, Riley’s team will open its season against a combo that should remind him an awful lot of himself and Leach.

Because of the talent gap between the two programs, Weis could learn some valuable lessons in his first game as an offensive coordinator. One thing is certain: He’ll remember every one of those lessons in vivid, photographic detail.

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think he’s be an instant upgrade over Beck as a play caller and schemer, but what is Harrell like as a recruiter? Seems like his family’s connections in Texas HS football would be beneficial to in-state recruiting. Is he USC’s primary recruiter for Bijan?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Longboard Horn said:

Harrell is the obvious choice. Sam would excel with him as OC.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok... Time to get creative.  Could this Brainiac be the next  Lincoln Riley or Joe Brady??  Charlie Weis Jr has a Photographic Memory...  Maybe Texas could find a spot on the Staff for him??
https://www.si.com/college/2018/08/20/charlie-weis-jr-age-florida-atlantic-lane-kiffin
 
Article --  August 2018
How Charlie Weis Jr., FAU's 25-Year-Old Offensive Coordinator, Earned Lane Kiffin's Trust
Charlie Weis Jr. is younger than any other coordinator in college football, but keep in mind that FAU's OC also started down this path—against the wishes of his father, the former Notre Dame and Kansas head coach—earlier than almost all of his peers.

BOCA RATON, Fla. — When Lane Kiffin was the offensive coordinator at Alabama in 2015, he interviewed a recent college grad who had done his undergraduate work at Florida and Kansas. Charlie Weis Jr., the son of the former Notre Dame and Kansas coach, sought an analyst job with the Crimson Tide, and Kiffin had been told the kid had a photographic memory.So during the interview, Kiffin handed Weis his driver’s license and his credit card. You can have these for three minutes, Kiffin recalled telling Weis. Then I’ll take them back and start asking questions. After the allotted time ended, Kiffin took back the cards and started the test.

What street do I live on?

Weis answered correctly. He correctly recited various facts gleaned from the two cards. The next day, Kiffin decided to test the job candidate’s retention.

What’s the expiration date on my credit card?

Weis answered correctly. If he didn’t already have the job, that cinched it.

Weis and Kiffin spent two seasons together in Tuscaloosa. Well, most of two seasons.   Kiffin jokes that they were 28–1 together and 0–1 apart. This year, they’re back together with different job titles. Kiffin is the second-year head coach at Florida Atlantic, leading a team that went 11–3 and won Conference USA last season. Weis, who turned 25 in April, is the offensive coordinator. “Sometimes it’s crazy to think about,” Weis said Sunday.

Weis doesn’t think about it too often, though. He’s too busy for introspection. A night earlier, Kiffin and Weis had led the FAU offense through its most important scrimmage of the preseason. They’re trying to winnow down a quarterback race that features three transfer quarterbacks competing to take the job abdicated by 2017 starter Jason Driskel, who opted to retire from football in January and who obtained a civil engineering degree in May. In less than two weeks, the Owls will open the season at Oklahoma. They haven’t trailed in a game since October, but they haven’t been challenged the way they will by the three-time defending Big 12 champ.

Whether former Sooner Chris Robison, former Florida State Seminole DeAndre Johnson or former Arkansas Razorback/SMU Mustang Rafe Peavey will win the job is a hot topic on campus, but an even more intriguing question is this: Which son of a famous football coach will call the plays? Will it be Kiffin—the son of legendary NFL defensive coordinator Monte—or Weis? Weis, asked what percentage of plays he called in Saturday’s scrimmage, deferred. “That’s up to coach Kiffin to talk about,” he said. “It’s not my place.” Kiffin didn’t give a direct answer either, and both men discussed a collaborative effort.

Their collaboration at Alabama worked beautifully for the Crimson Tide. Kiffin designed the game plans with help from Weis, whose memory and attention to detail allowed him to find vulnerabilities in defenses that Kiffin could exploit on gameday. If the Owls can now combine Kiffin’s ability to spot potential huge plays in-game with Weis’s thorough prep and instant recall, the offense should be as good or better than the one that put up 6.8 yards a play and 40.6 points a game last season. That recall, Kiffin believes, will give FAU the equivalent of the photos that we see NFL quarterbacks thumbing through on the sidelines during games. Such photos aren’t allowed in college football, but there is no rule against a coach taking one in his head. Kiffin had an idea Weis could do that when, during his Alabama interview, Weis rattled off all 11 jersey numbers for the starting defense of a team he’d scouted earlier. After working so closely with Weis in ’15 and ’16, Kiffin is sure of it.

Weis was sure he wanted to be a coach when he was still a student at St. Joseph High in South Bend, Ind. He didn’t play there, either. He helped break down video at his school, and he also helped defensive coaches signal for his dad’s team. This lack of between-the-lines experience may seem like a disadvantage, but think about the list of excellent players who became excellent coaches. Steve Spurrier won a Heisman Trophy as a player and a national title as a coach. Mike Gundy started at quarterback for the program he now runs. Pat Fitzgerald starred at linebacker for the program he runs. But for the most part, the best coaches were average or below-average players. Kiffin, who was a reserve quarterback at Fresno State before transitioning into coaching while still an undergraduate, points out that while everyone else was playing, Weis was learning how to coach. So he’s got the same experience at 25 as a 30-year-old who played college and then started coaching. “I’m very similar in age to a lot of these guys, but starting coaching from 18 years old, I feel like I committed my life to that early on,” Weis said. “I wasn’t doing other things when I was in college. I was always around the building.”

This is not what Weis’s parents wanted for him. “They said ‘No, no, no’ from the second I decided to do it,” he said. Charlie Sr. helped win Super Bowls as Bill Belichick’s offensive coordinator in New England. He then made a fortune as the head coach at Notre Dame, the offensive coordinator at Florida and then the head coach at Kansas. But the elder Weis also got ripped mercilessly for a lack of success in his later years in South Bend and for the contract then-Notre Dame athletic director Kevin White* gave him that resulted in nearly $19 million in buyout payments between 2009 and ’16. While Notre Dame was still paying the elder Weis, he got hired and fired by Kansas and left the program in a hole out of which it has yet to crawl. But the criticism of the elder Weis wasn’t always limited to wins and losses. He was routinely skewered for his weight and his appearance.

*In March, Kevin White’s son Brian was named the AD at FAU. He is now the boss of Kiffin and the younger Weis.

Charlie Jr. has a unique look, but it’s only because he’s the only one on the Owls’ staff—which also includes 26-year-old strength coach Wilson Love—who looks even younger than his players. “Some people on the defensive side thought he was a player,” tight end Harrison Bryant said of the younger Weis’s first few days on campus. “But the first time we met him, you could tell he knows so much about the game.” Tailback Devin “Motor” Singletary, who ran for 32 touchdowns last season, said Weis communicates so easily with the players because of his age. “He’s like an older brother in a way,” Singletary said.

After graduating high school, the younger Weis followed his dad to Florida, where Charlie Sr. had been hired to run the offense for first-year coach Will Muschamp. Charlie Jr. was placed “on the bottom of the pile.” Those analysts and quality control guys who assist the assistant coaches? Weis was their assistant. He wrote up film breakdowns. He made play cards the graduate assistants could show to the scout team. When the elder Weis got the Kansas job, Charlie Jr. went to Lawrence with him. The work remained menial. After his father was fired, Charlie Jr. headed to Tuscaloosa for a date with Kiffin’s credit card. Charlie Jr. had originally planned to join Kiffin at FAU as the tight ends coach, and he spent time on the staff when last year’s offensive coordinator Kendal Briles was installing the scheme, but Weis was offered a job as an analyst for Atlanta Falcons offensive coordinator—and Kiffin compatriot—Steve Sarkisian. When Briles left for Houston after last season, Kiffin hired Weis again.

There will be times when the older brother must hand down discipline, but Weis understands he’ll need to have difficult conversations with his players. Kiffin, who first became an offensive coordinator at USC at 29 and first became a head coach when the Oakland Raiders hired him at 31, believes Weis will handle those duties better than he would have at that age. “I’m trying to help him not make some mistakes that I made. But he’ll be fine,” Kiffin said. “He’s a lot more balanced than I was at that age and more mature. We do talk about that, but I don’t think he’s going to have issues.”

If Weis is indeed as mature as Kiffin suggests, this could be like the relationship between then-Texas Tech coach Mike Leach and young receivers coach Lincoln Riley, who acted like a 40-year-old when he was 23. When Leach was fired by Texas Tech before the Alamo Bowl following the 2009 season, a 26-year-old Riley called the offensive plays for interim coach Ruffin McNeill. McNeill then took Riley with him to East Carolina, making Riley an offensive coordinator at that age. Last year, Riley took over the Sooners at 33 after serving as their offensive coordinator for two seasons. In 2017, he turned 34, won the Big 12 and made the College Football Playoff. On Sept. 1, Riley’s team will open its season against a combo that should remind him an awful lot of himself and Leach.

Because of the talent gap between the two programs, Weis could learn some valuable lessons in his first game as an offensive coordinator. One thing is certain: He’ll remember every one of those lessons in vivid, photographic detail.



_103188764_6589f477-d612-4b0d-8488-7f38aee3ea71.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LTtxfan said:

 

Sure seems like an asshole, he would fit right in.

CHIEF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, CHIEF said:

Sure seems like an asshole, he would fit right in.

CHIEF

Seriously?!  An asshole. I watched the entire video and if you think he's an asshole then you must be a millennial snowflake.  I like him a lot.  He better be our hire. He was teaching, he complemented freely when players executed. When they didn't execute, he taught, when he questioned the qb, he said I want to hear why? he wanted to know what he thought he saw so he could correct it.  he related nicely with the WR during their after practice catch drills.  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dude, please check your sarcasm meter. Can't even make jokes around here anymore. Jeez.

CHIEF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep Mensa out of it.

There's no such thing as "group" playcalling. Create a scheme, gameplan, execute and adjust.

Edited by Zavala

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there a shop around these parts that can recalibrate sarcasm meters? We could get one hell of a discount on a group rate!

Fuck the (shit record, coaching search and what the hell is going on with recruiting) almost here offseason!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LTtxfan said:

 

Holy shit I thought he was competent, that was like a JV b team practice lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Seriously?!  An asshole. I watched the entire video and if you think he's an asshole then you must be a millennial snowflake.  I like him a lot.  He better be our hire. He was teaching, he complemented freely when players executed. When they didn't execute, he taught, when he questioned the qb, he said I want to hear why? he wanted to know what he thought he saw so he could correct it.  he related nicely with the WR during their after practice catch drills.  
 
 
Lol. You lash out at a joke but it's those millenials that are the snowflakes.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/22/2019 at 7:28 AM, Steamboat1874 said:

Fuck you morons....you know nothing about football obviously.

Our offense is currently ranked #16 in the country.

Get a fucking clue.

Aged like fine wine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, alphahorn said:

Seriously?!  An asshole. I watched the entire video and if you think he's an asshole then you must be a millennial snowflake.  

 

 

Ok, boomer. Hook em.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, gmr548 said:

Seriously?!  An asshole.

I'm learning that any coach mentioned in the Coordinator searches is an asshole.

 

Weird, usually that type of thing used to go without mention. Most coaches have that bone in them. Just gotta use it right and know when not to. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/3/2019 at 6:35 AM, LTtxfan said:

Graham Harrell and WWE...

 

Harrell gonna like that The Undertaker and Mark Henry are Texas fans!!

 

 

Edited by LTtxfan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/2/2019 at 2:00 PM, J S said:

What would it take to get Kevin Wilson / Ohio State?

Great thought. Wilson isn't leaving Ohio State. His interviews are very telling. 

Joe Brady should be the obvious name. The recruiting boost will be unimaginable. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...