Jump to content

The Boat Fanatic Thread


Recommended Posts

There’s no yellow or black paint? Right?

Right. The murder hornet is not a suspect at this time.

I don’t see anyone else’s paint there. I went and checked the starboard side of all the boats that have to pass mine to leave the marina. I didn’t find any smoking guns unfortunately. I have a pretty particular paint and I was looking to see if it was rubbed onto anyone’s boat, but I didn’t find it. I did find these suspicious and consistent marks on the starboard side of a boat a couple of slips over, but it doesn’t really prove much.

19e9e3a009d818339e920e844e7de6f6.jpg

Waiting on an estimate from a gel coat guy. And I just purchased a cover for the platform. I’ll probably see if I can modify the cover with a pool noodle to serve as a bumper. My platform sticks out in the channel more than most of the other boats by about a foot. But I pull as far forward as I am able. My boat is nose to nose with the boat in front of it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted this on a boating forum, but thought I'd try here too...

Looking at possibly getting a used Carver C34 and curious to hear everyone's thoughts on two of the engine options.  One is a Merc 4.5L Bravo 3 DTS 250 HP and the other is a Merc 6.2L Bravo 3 DTS 300 HP.  Is the 4.5L enough to power this boat or do I need the 6.2L?  I believe the smaller one is a V6 and the larger one is a V8.  The boat is 34 foot length, 11.5 foot beam, 17,300 lb dry weight.  I'm on Lake Lewisville and not much into speed.  We really just like to cruise around and get some sun and have a few drinks a few hours a weekend.  So, the smaller engine may be enough for me.  But do I need to worry for resale?  Of course, the one that's the color and has the other options I want is the smaller engine and the color I don't want that doesn't have all the options I want is the bigger one.  Let me know your thoughts and TIA

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted this on a boating forum, but thought I'd try here too...
Looking at possibly getting a used Carver C34 and curious to hear everyone's thoughts on two of the engine options.  One is a Merc 4.5L Bravo 3 DTS 250 HP and the other is a Merc 6.2L Bravo 3 DTS 300 HP.  Is the 4.5L enough to power this boat or do I need the 6.2L?  I believe the smaller one is a V6 and the larger one is a V8.  The boat is 34 foot length, 11.5 foot beam, 17,300 lb dry weight.  I'm on Lake Lewisville and not much into speed.  We really just like to cruise around and get some sun and have a few drinks a few hours a weekend.  So, the smaller engine may be enough for me.  But do I need to worry for resale?  Of course, the one that's the color and has the other options I want is the smaller engine and the color I don't want that doesn't have all the options I want is the bigger one.  Let me know your thoughts and TIA
 

Bigger engine. Every single time. For multiple reasons.

Smaller engine works harder to do the same thing. Also, if you ever need to go fast (someone is hurt, weather, etc) your going to want the capability.

That 4.5 is a v6 Btw.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Handcruser said:


Bigger engine. Every single time. For multiple reasons.

Smaller engine works harder to do the same thing. Also, if you ever need to go fast (someone is hurt, weather, etc) your going to want the capability.

That 4.5 is a v6 Btw.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

It's a great boat, I just wish I'd gotten the smaller engine....said no one, ever. 

  • Hook 'Em 2
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Handcruser said:

Bigger engine. Every single time. For multiple reasons.

I’ll take a merc 450 before a 627, but, overall this is the correct answer.  Also, the 6.2 is a really really great platform.  Personally I wouldn’t consider a boat that wasn’t optioned for the max. 
 

No such thing as spare change or too much horsepower.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, fattyflattie said:

I’ll take a merc 450 before a 627, but, overall this is the correct answer.  Also, the 6.2 is a really really great platform.  Personally I wouldn’t consider a boat that wasn’t optioned for the max. 
 

No such thing as spare change or too much horsepower.  

Seven Marine is ending production after the New Year, so you may able to get you a good deal on a 627.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Brew said:

Seven Marine is ending production after the New Year, so you may able to get you a good deal on a 627.

Damn that sucks. Not that I would be in the market. My statement was absolutely and completely due to the fact my rig couldn’t float it. I can handle the weight of the 450 tho...

eta: the new 300 would the be ticket if I had to grab something today. I’m hoping they can get up to 325-350 on that platform before it’s time tho.  

Edited by fattyflattie
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bob Lives! said:

$700 to fix that damn ding.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I was scared to find out the number on this.  Put a 3 inch scratch on mine a few weekends ago at the gas pumps.  

Looks like I've got some YouTube DIYs to watch!

Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter is pretty impressed with Surly's adoption of the moniker "Murder Hornet".

Of course, she was the mascot at Kealing Middle School, so there's bias present.

That team certainly didn't play up to the image (full disclosure).  They identified as Honey Bees I'm guessing.  No judgement.  I crapped myself the first time she came home in that garb -

IMG_1498.jpeg

Edited by Cajun
  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Cajun said:

I was scared to find out the number on this.  Put a 3 inch scratch on mine a few weekends ago at the gas pumps.  

Looks like I've got some YouTube DIYs to watch!

I already hired this guy to come out to the Marina and repair a 3" scratch on the white portion of my gel coat.  That was only $250.  I can send you his info if you're interested.  That was a lot easier to swallow since it was my fault and not too expensive.  You can't tell it ever happened. 

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Bob Lives! said:

I already hired this guy to come out to the Marina and repair a 3" scratch on the white portion of my gel coat.  That was only $250.  I can send you his info if you're interested.  That was a lot easier to swallow since it was my fault and not too expensive.  You can't tell it ever happened. 

Well, I'm down at Canyon Lake and live in SA.  If he travels that far then, yeah, PM me his digits.  I'll put him on my short list.

Link to post
Share on other sites

first year without winter service from the marina.  girlfriend is gonna take this on as one of her honey-do responsibilities, I didn't even have to withhold sex to convince her.  yay me.  she did ask me to ask my "boy board" what y'all do.  so what do you all do to winterize or protect for the winter?  we theoretically could start it once a month to make sure it's not gumming up and whatever.  anyway, options?  what say the mechanically inclined of you?

Link to post
Share on other sites
One thing I'll say is make sure you've got plenty of fuel treatent in there and run it for a bit before letting it sit for awhile, assuming you're running on 10% or more ethanol fuel.
Just the first thing that came to mind
 

We run premium no ethanol. Not sure what that means for winterizing really.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Winterizing a boat generally means removing any water in the cooling system that might freeze and getting conditioned/stabilized fuel in in the carbs/vst tank/fuel injection system, etc to prevent ethanol gumming and fuel breakdown.  You could also change lower unit/transmission/engine oil so the drivetrain parts are sitting in new lube.  Last, you could disconnect the battery or put on a battery maintainer to keep it charged. 

For a wake boat you probably want to purge any water from the ballast system.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Not sure what that means for winterizing really.

 

It just means that while your boat sits there with fuel in the system that there is no worry of goddamned ethanol eating away at all sorts of shit within the fuel system.  Longer it sits, more it eats.  

Winter is a time when the boat sits without use, hence, in my view it's an aspect of "winterization".

For you, though, it's one less thing to worry about because you chose well when filling up.

Edited by Cajun
Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Cajun said:

For you, though, it's one less thing to worry about because you chose well when filling up.

For those that don’t though, or don’t have it readily available. Filling the tank up to the hilt keeps it from absorbing much water.  I mean all the way up the filler tube full.  I drain my tank down to dry every other year or so last few years to make sure, but a bit more humid here too.   That’s all I have to offer wrt to “winterizing”; bay boat=duck boat in the winter :) 

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, troph said:

first year without winter service from the marina.  girlfriend is gonna take this on as one of her honey-do responsibilities, I didn't even have to withhold sex to convince her.  yay me.  she did ask me to ask my "boy board" what y'all do.  so what do you all do to winterize or protect for the winter?  we theoretically could start it once a month to make sure it's not gumming up and whatever.  anyway, options?  what say the mechanically inclined of you?

Your manual should give you a rundown of everything. On mine I change the oil and run fuel conditioner through first. Then I disconnect all cooling hoses and drain the water, pull the drain plugs on the block and manifolds and drain all water, partially fill ballast with RV antifreeze, fog the engine, and disconnect and charge batteries. Others will just run antifreeze through the entire cooling system and then do the other steps. There are other things like plugs, impeller, change all fluids, etc that are on other rotations.

I’m in a colder winter environment so some steps may not be necessary.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Cajun said:

 

It just means that while your boat sits there with fuel in the system that there is no worry of goddamned ethanol eating away at all sorts of shit within the fuel system.  Longer it sits, more it eats.  

Winter is a time when the boat sits without use, hence, in my view it's an aspect of "winterization".

For you, though, it's one less thing to worry about because you chose well when filling up.

You still need to run a stabilizer in the winter I believe. There is still an issue with condensation and evaporation in the fuel system. Running nonethanol fuel can actually compound the water issue because ethanol combines with water and burns the water off whereas gas will stay separate and water can build up.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Cajun said:

This is where I’m really happy with having my rig in a heated, enclosed storage space.

I keep mine in a shop I keep heated, but I still winterize it just in case something happens to the heat. I don’t check on it very often unless I’m out at the farm for some reason.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, every situation is different.  I don't even heat unless we're looking at sub 32 temps, which is 2 or 3 times a year tops (sometimes never).  It's 40 minutes from my front door.  I'll do some basic stuff like change oil and other fluids and I'll drain whatever's easy, but the rest is just not a worry.

It's also nice that when I pull that sucker out in the Spring, it is as clean as a hospital OR for that first spin of the new year.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Brew said:

You still need to run a stabilizer in the winter I believe. There is still an issue with condensation and evaporation in the fuel system. Running nonethanol fuel can actually compound the water issue because ethanol combines with water and burns the water off whereas gas will stay separate and water can build up.

Yes and a full tank reduces the volume of air that breathes into and out of the tank with temperature expansion and contraction.

Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, davidg said:

Yes and a full tank reduces the volume of air that breathes into and out of the tank with temperature expansion and contraction.

Yep.  I fill it to the hilt after every trip. Just makes it easier on the water separators, makes it easier on mixing the additive, makes it easy knowing it’s ready to go when you hook up to it.  And can do the math on the trip mileage. 
 

Link to post
Share on other sites

We’ve had this place on the lake for 16 years, we moved out here full time 5 years ago. Originally it was 100% fishing, then kids came along and it was toobing, then skiing, then wakeboarding. Last year we were introduced to wakesurfing and we were hooked. I sold my fish and ski and got a boat we could wakesurf behind. I found an ‘06 Supra. It also meant we had to tear down the old dock and build a new one. We got the new boathouse done in July and had a blast this summer. Our lake is often like glass so it makes for great surfing. We’re loving the née dock, wish we would have done it years ago.
73afaacd76728a2e47c2b8fffc4bb860.jpg
938cc222724b6271037c4ddbc2c8eddd.jpg
40788a94c5ca6147399095f528fb6e8e.jpg
d57cac0ebb950ada2686afef8066a992.jpg

ee9d35a311b68e2e676c18a35f9d1e58.jpg
4e88fb891abb2e0c9b2adefda1d351ad.jpg
6d2bfa6df8da31d94ab223daaea0fda7.jpg



c849a42b641898816c97e021622cc359.jpg
06b3c39a1e4eba111169d4d1dc116d7e.jpg

  • Hook 'Em 4
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Horns99 said:

 

 


Troph, above is all you really need to & since your boat is sitting right above the water, that keeps it warmer also, has to get really freaking cold to do any freeze damage.

 

 

When you buy new ballast pumps next year, you’ll decide to winterize the ballast system going forward. Any system with water needs to be winterized and make sure it’s cleared out.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Does wake surfing put twisting pressure on knees? I have a knee with a permanently torn ligament and have to be careful of lateral movement.

Not at all, it’s really easy on the body because you are only going 8-10 mph, and you normally don’t have hard crashes, you normally just fall out of the wave and sink. No sore arms from holding a rope. Once you learn, it so easy to get up. There’s a lot of surface area on the board so you just stand up.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Does wake surfing put twisting pressure on knees? I have a knee with a permanently torn ligament and have to be careful of lateral movement.

Not much but I’m sure you could hurt yourself. It’s very much a low impact sport but it is a core and balance work out. I wouldn’t trust anyone but yourself on whether your knee holds up. It is absolutely not tennis, basketball, wakeboarding or skiing but it’s not nothing for a weakened knee. You can usually bail on a position before anything happens, but freak stuff can happen. I’ve lost my balance and the board has violently slipped out from under me, it was a no big deal other than a rough fall but my knees are ok so far, so anything can happen.
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Dbeasy said:

Does wake surfing put twisting pressure on knees? I have a knee with a permanently torn ligament and have to be careful of lateral movement.

If wakesurfing is a worry then so should be just walking to the bathroom.

 

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not much but I’m sure you could hurt yourself. It’s very much a low impact sport but it is a core and balance work out. I wouldn’t trust anyone but yourself on whether your knee holds up. It is absolutely not tennis, basketball, wakeboarding or skiing but it’s not nothing for a weakened knee. You can usually bail on a position before anything happens, but freak stuff can happen. I’ve lost my balance and the board has violently slipped out from under me, it was a no big deal other than a rough fall but my knees are ok so far, so anything can happen.

I agree with this. A beginner without experience getting up on a wakeboard often struggles and stability can be an issue that may be difficult for someone with bad knees. If someone has done water sports in the past it is pretty easy to transfer and once you get it, wakesurfing can be very easy on the knees if you take it easy.
Link to post
Share on other sites
We’ve had this place on the lake for 16 years, we moved out here full time 5 years ago. Originally it was 100% fishing, then kids came along and it was toobing, then skiing, then wakeboarding. Last year we were introduced to wakesurfing and we were hooked. I sold my fish and ski and got a boat we could wakesurf behind. I found an ‘06 Supra. It also meant we had to tear down the old dock and build a new one. We got the new boathouse done in July and had a blast this summer. Our lake is often like glass so it makes for great surfing. We’re loving the née dock, wish we would have done it years ago.
73afaacd76728a2e47c2b8fffc4bb860.jpg
938cc222724b6271037c4ddbc2c8eddd.jpg
40788a94c5ca6147399095f528fb6e8e.jpg
d57cac0ebb950ada2686afef8066a992.jpg

ee9d35a311b68e2e676c18a35f9d1e58.jpg
4e88fb891abb2e0c9b2adefda1d351ad.jpg
6d2bfa6df8da31d94ab223daaea0fda7.jpg



c849a42b641898816c97e021622cc359.jpg
06b3c39a1e4eba111169d4d1dc116d7e.jpg

What lake?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...