Jump to content
HenryJames

Beer 2019, imo.

Recommended Posts

be78ca575892ba532349140302fb8aee.jpg
If anyone is ever up in South Dakota and the Black Hills/Badlands area. Find yourself some Lost Cabin. Having their season red IPA tonight and it’s very good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When in California (San Diego all the way up north to San Clemente to be exact), might I recommend Pizza Port for your beer and pizza needs? I’ve been to them all and can’t pass one up if I’m in their town. Good stuff.

435ede6515a15b3b735d6e8ee34008d8.jpg

fc9b8c6f6524093c47b1184619dad5b6.jpg

6155c12a68202f81eae1ad53cd804c91.jpg

b0563a06db01cdd55fb49a49dab18b48.jpg

4a8f06a402dcde833cafba8ca6036702.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In.

 

Had Erebus by Martin House recently. Scotch barrel aged imperial stout. It was super tasty. Not too sweet, and the coffee wasn’t overbearing. MH continues to impress me with their small batch releases.

 

df41b3e26e6701c3c68c30dd8c03d285.jpg

 

No pics unfortunately, but I was here when I drank it. Beer seems to taste better in the desert.

 

ddc443706591bb799d3e6492551629d3.jpg

 

b42a90b63dc01ea1f46ab9d35c2a992c.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/1/2019 at 9:20 PM, CrownKing said:

Prediction:  Brut replaces hazy as the next thing. 

 

I'm liking the Brut thing, but I get the impression more people like the haze.

The reason haze has caught on is because people who don't like bitter, dry flavors (which are a fuck ton of people) don't experience it with the hazebro IPAs.  I'm becoming drawn back to hoppy beers that taste like fucking beer (I still like hazy IPAs - just burned out on the trend), and the Bruts are more that way, IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Al_4_ISU said:

I'm liking the Brut thing, but I get the impression more people like the haze.

The reason haze has caught on is because people who don't like bitter, dry flavors (which are a fuck ton of people) don't experience it with the hazebro IPAs.  I'm becoming drawn back to hoppy beers that taste like fucking beer (I still like hazy IPAs - just burned out on the trend), and the Bruts are more that way, IMO.

The hazy IPA's that I've enjoyed the most are much more balanced and less of a juice bomb.  Frankly, the ones I had up in New England last summer were more along this line than the most of the Texas versions I've tried recently (with Celestial's Kepler being a notable positive exception).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, DDD Dad said:

The hazy IPA's that I've enjoyed the most are much more balanced and less of a juice bomb.  Frankly, the ones I had up in New England last summer were more along this line than the most of the Texas versions I've tried recently (with Celestial's Kepler being a notable positive exception).

I'm with you there.

We've got a mix in Iowa.  I live very close to Toppling Goliath, and the lesser known but equally good (if not better) Pulpit Rock.  My favorites from each brewery are as you described, but it seems like their juice bombs are preferred by the average client.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I go back and forth, though I don’t think we still get that many true juice bombs up here. The west coast breweries still don’t always do a good job at it. And we still have a good amount of Toppling Goliath which has been awesome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m certainly a fan of hazy IPAs and I think it’s interesting how many breweries are making really tremendous hazy IPAs. From the limited experience I’ve had with homebrewing, my working theory is that the hazy IPA recipe has unlocked the “cheat code” for making an overall pleasing IPA to those who like IPAs. That is, I found that the “hazy” elements of the hazy IPA recipe (oats and I suppose the yeast strain) seemed to “even out” the rough edges in the homebrews we otherwise were making...especially when compared to the more traditional West Coast style IPAs we were making before. I think the traditional West Coast IPA is a less forgiving art than the hazy IPA.

Likewise, I’ve found it interesting when I’ve traveled how many breweries I’ve never heard of are making some really tasty and 4+ rating (Untapped) hazy IPAs. By comparison, I never remember seeing as many breweries I had never heard who were making 4+ rating West Coast style IPAs.

Having said all that and as much as I like hazy IPAs, I also find that I don’t usually crave more than one a night (and want to switch to a more traditional West Coast or...now, brut IPA if I’m having another). While I love a good hazy IPA, I’ll always also crave the traditional West Coast version. Thus, while I love a hazy IPA, I do wish more breweries were doing more of a mix of hazy vs traditional West Coast styles. It seems most everyone is going all-in on hazy crazy.


TLDR: IPA beer nerd said too much stuff about beer nerdy IPAs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Al_4_ISU said:

I'm becoming drawn back to hoppy beers that taste like fucking beer...

But what if I don’t think beer should taste like a pine cone dipped in Lysol?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, mdleast said:

I’m certainly a fan of hazy IPAs and I think it’s interesting how many breweries are making really tremendous hazy IPAs. From the limited experience I’ve had with homebrewing, my working theory is that the hazy IPA recipe has unlocked the “cheat code” for making an overall pleasing IPA to those who like IPAs. That is, I found that the “hazy” elements of the hazy IPA recipe (oats and I suppose the yeast strain) seemed to “even out” the rough edges in the homebrews we otherwise were making...especially when compared to the more traditional West Coast style IPAs we were making before. I think the traditional West Coast IPA is a less forgiving art than the hazy IPA.

Likewise, I’ve found it interesting when I’ve traveled how many breweries I’ve never heard of are making some really tasty and 4+ rating (Untapped) hazy IPAs. By comparison, I never remember seeing as many breweries I had never heard who were making 4+ rating West Coast style IPAs.

Having said all that and as much as I like hazy IPAs, I also find that I don’t usually crave more than one a night (and want to switch to a more traditional West Coast or...now, brut IPA if I’m having another). While I love a good hazy IPA, I’ll always also crave the traditional West Coast version. Thus, while I love a hazy IPA, I do wish more breweries were doing more of a mix of hazy vs traditional West Coast styles. It seems most everyone is going all-in on hazy crazy.


TLDR: IPA beer nerd said too much stuff about beer nerdy IPAs.

 

28 minutes ago, HenryJames said:

But what if I don’t think beer should taste like a pine cone dipped in Lysol?

No kidding.  It sounds to me like he's complaining that there aren't enough west coast IPAs, douple IPAs, brut IPAs, or even hoppy APAs being produced.  That has definitely NOT been my experience in sampling craft breweries and brewpubs around this great nation of ours.

Perhaps he's upset that 100% of all beers produced by American craft breweries aren't tongue-curling bitter bombs? ;)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, HenryJames said:

But what if I don’t think beer should taste like a pine cone dipped in Lysol?

That's fine.  This is the golden age of hop bombs.

A real good West Coast IPA doesn't necessarily have that tongue curling bitterness, and there are plenty of hoppy beers that are neither juice bombs nor pine cone face fuckings.  One of my go-to beers (when I can get across the mighty MIssissippi) is New Glarus's Moon Man.  It's very aromatic and hoppy, but not too bitter and has a good light body.  Like a fuller version of Founder's All Day, in a way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, shnsajax said:

I go back and forth, though I don’t think we still get that many true juice bombs up here. The west coast breweries still don’t always do a good job at it. And we still have a good amount of Toppling Goliath which has been awesome.

I'm still blown away that they've jumped into the West Coast and NE markets.  Talk about IPA ground zero.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Al_4_ISU said:

I'm still blown away that they've jumped into the West Coast and NE markets.  Talk about IPA ground zero.

Pretty sure it was a 1 time drop, though I am hoping I am wrong. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Silver Eagle to bring Louisiana’s Parish Brewing Co. beer to Texas

Houston-based Silver Eagle Distributors has inked a deal to distribute that will bring beer from Louisiana’s second largest brewery to Texas for the first time, according to a Jan. 9 press release.

The roll-out will begin with Broussard, Louisiana-based Parish Brewing Co.’s draft offerings at restaurants and bars across the Houston area the week of Jan. 14. Distribution of Parish’s packaged products in Houston will begin this spring. 

Per the release, year-round offerings will include: 

  • Canebrake: (Louisiana Wheat Ale) With highlights of "honey-sweet remnants of Louisiana sugarcane and notes of citrus on the finish from Cascade hops picked from Oregon."
  • Envie: (American Pale Ale) With "hop aromas of mango, lychee, orange, and other tropical fruits. … (It has) the best juicy qualities of hops but none of the harsh, bitter finish."
  • South Coast: (Session Amber Ale) "This ale is smooth, clean, delicately hoppy and mildly malty (and) evenly balanced between noble hops and delicious malts." 
  • Ghost in the Machine: (Double IPA) Brewed with large "quantities of hand-selected Citra hops from Yakima Valley, Washington, for a profile that is hazy, tropical and full of pure hop juice."
  • Rêve: (Coffee Stout) "This silky smooth coffee stout is created with a carefully selected blend of specialty-grade estate beans from Columbia and Java. The beans are finished to a city/full city roast to highlight their true character and origin." 

“We get calls and emails almost daily from the Texas market asking for our beers, and we have been working hard to increase production capacity to finally be able to sell our products in Houston,” Andrew Godley, founder and president of Parish Brewing Co., said in the release. “We are excited to finally be a big part of the market and will focus on getting our full distributed portfolio to retailers across the area. Texans are our neighbors and we will work hard to grow our brands there — the market is very important to our company.”

Silver Eagle is the second largest independent beer distributor nationwide, per the release. The company serves 16 counties in Texas and employs more than 1,500 employees across its operations in Houston, San Antonio, Pasadena, Cypress, Conroe and Rosenberg. 

 

2019 getting off to a good start.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, shnsajax said:

Pretty sure it was a 1 time drop, though I am hoping I am wrong. 

I thought they were trying to be a regular player out there.

I would bet that they go Ballast Point as soon as they can, sell out to InBev, and become nationally available in the next 3 years. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Al_4_ISU said:

I thought they were trying to be a regular player out there.

I would bet that they go Ballast Point as soon as they can, sell out to InBev, and become nationally available in the next 3 years. 

I hope so to only the first one as one. I think it was a part of the same company that does distros to Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, shnsajax said:

I hope so to only the first one as one. I think it was a part of the same company that does distros to Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.

I would bet a large sum of money on the second part.  It's unfortunate, but that's the way the owner thinks.  They operate in a quasi-unscrupulous manner (the ownership - the brewer is a true craftsman) and once they realized the revenue potential it had, every move they've made is pretty clearly positioning themselves for that end game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, going to Nashville, Asheville, Hilton Head, then Savannah, GA in May.  Anyone have any strong recs for any or all of those cities?  Wife's list thus far:

Nashville –  
TO DRINK: Tennessee Brew Works, Southern Grists Brewing, 
TO EAT: mop/broom mess hall, Hattie B’s Hot Chicken
 
Asheville- 
TO DRINK: Wicked weed brewery, green man brewery, 
TO EAT: gan shan station, buxton hall bbq, biscuit head
 
Hilton Head – 
TO DRINK: Hilton head brewing company, the lodge, world of beers, 
TO EAT: low country backyard, salty dog café, frozen moo, skullcreek boathouse, quarterdeck, 
 
Savannah- 
TO DRINK: southbound brewing, service brewing, coastal empire beer, moon river brewing, 
TO EAT: five oaks taproom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked Yazoo in Nashville.  Their Foeder was damn solid if you like sours.

Hattie B's has a stupid long line at all times.  There was a place near Yazoo and Jackalope (and across the highway from our VRBO) called Party Fowl that had delicious hot chicken and a ton of local beers on tap.  If you insist on Hattie B's, I understand, but between the quality of the food, beer selection, and being able to complete the experience seated, drinking, and not in a fucking line, I'd strongly recommend it.

Edited by Al_4_ISU

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Smith & Lentz in Nashville.

Dunno about WW in Asheville though. Maybe if the funkatorium is still a thing. Otherwise, i'd rather do green man, burial, hi wire, french broad, and maybe pisgha after some good hiking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

May have been the time and place, but I had several River Dog IPAs one afternoon that seemed to stand out from the rest a couple months back on our SC Trip.

 

Westbrook was unremarkable, had the Kolsch and IPA. Without having every offering from either I’d rate Palmetto > Westbrook overall. IIRC, both were at most restaurants and bars in Charleston and HHI.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What was the price?  My local beer station wants 18.50 for a 4 pack


I think it’s $16 at heb.
Heb open joke.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/10/2019 at 3:33 PM, 4th&Five said:

i really enjoyed jackalope in nashville.  you can walk to yazoo from it too. 

I liked jackalope a lot when I visited. Liked the beers better than Yazoo. Talked to the founders sitting in the taproom on a random weekday too and they were cool. Although this was years ago. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...