Jump to content

The Official Colt McCoy 2021 Destination Thread


jettrink
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 5 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Brackens_McCoy_TXHS_HOF_2_WEB.jpg?width=

Two Longhorn Legends inducted into Texas High School Football Hall of Fame

Defensive end Tony Brackens and quarterback Colt McCoy were inducted as part of the Class of 2022.

WACO, Texas – Longhorn Legends Tony Brackens (Fairfield High School) and Colt McCoy (Tuscola/Jim Ned High School) have been inducted into the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame as members of the class of 2022.

Brackens, an All-American defensive end at Texas from 1993-95, and McCoy, a National Player of the Year and record-setting quarterback from 2006-09, were formally recognized and inducted on Saturday night at the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in Waco.

Quote

McCoy was a two-time Associated Press 2A Offensive MVP and first-team all-state selection at Jim Ned High School, where he posted a 34-2 record as a starting quarterback. The future Longhorn great finished his prep career as the all-time leading passer (9,344 yards and 116 TDs) in Texas 2A history and sixth overall in Texas high school history. He led his team to a 2A state championship game in football and also to the state tournament in basketball during his prep career.

ColtMcCoy_Hall_2022.jpg

A two-time winner of the prestigious Walter Camp Football Foundation (WCFF) National Player of the Year award, consensus first-team All-American and Heisman Trophy finalist, McCoy is one of six Longhorns with his jersey number retired at Texas. In addition to those honors, McCoy claimed the Maxwell Award (nation's top player), AT&T Player of the Year, Davey O'Brien Award (nation's top QB), Manning Award (nation's top QB) and Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award (nation's top QB) as a senior in 2009. He was also named the Big 12 Offensive Player of the Year by both The Associated Press and the league's coaches that year and earned that honor twice from The AP. McCoy earned bowl game offensive MVP honors three times in leading Texas to victories at the 2006 Alamo Bowl, 2007 Holiday Bowl and the Fiesta Bowl following the 2008 season.

A four-year starter with a 45-8 career record, he finished his career as the NCAA's all-time winningest quarterback and was the first QB in major college football history to lead a team to four 10-win seasons. He is also the first QB in Texas history to lead his team to consecutive 12-win seasons and just the second, joining Vince Young, to lead his team to consecutive 11-win seasons. A redshirt backup to Young on the 2005 National Championship team, McCoy led Texas to a 13-1 record and No. 2 ranking in 2009, a 12-1 mark and No. 3 ranking in 2008, and a pair of 10-3 records in 2006-07 with a No. 10 ranking in 2007 and No. 13 in 2006.

Statistically, McCoy finished his career with 47 school records including 16 career, 13 single-season, five single-game, six freshman and seven miscellaneous marks. During his 53-game career, he completed 1,157-of-1,645 passes (70.3 percent) for 13,253 yards and 112 TDs for a passer rating of 155.0. When his career concluded, his 13,253 passing yards were sixth on the NCAA all-time list, his 112 TD passes ranked seventh and his 70.3 career completion was just shy of the NCAA record. In addition, McCoy rushed for 1,571 yards and 20 TDs on 447 carries (3.5 ypc), while rushing and passing for a TD in the same game 14 times during his career. In combining his passing (112) and rushing (20) TDs, McCoy finished his career ranked sixth on the NCAA's touchdowns responsible for list and first at UT in that category with 132. He had scored at least one TD in 30 straight games entering the 2009 BCS National Championship Game. McCoy is UT's all-time leader in total offense and finished his career ranked fourth on the NCAA all-time list in that category, having produced 14,824 yards (13,253p/1,571r) on 2,092 plays (7.1 ypp).

In 14 games as a senior in 2009, the year he led Texas to a Big 12 title and the National Championship game, McCoy completed 332-of-470 (70.6 percent) for 3,521 yards and 27 TDs, while rushing for another 348 yards and three TDs. His 70.6 completion percentage led the nation. McCoy's 147.4 pass efficiency rating ranked 16th, and he averaged 26.6 yards per TD pass on his 27 scoring throws. As a junior in 2008, he set UT single-season records for passing yards (3,859), passing TDs (34) and total offense (4,420). With the addition of his 11 rushing TDs, he also set the UT single-season record for most TDs responsible for with 45 that year. McCoy was the Sporting News National Freshman of the Year and Big 12 Offensive Freshman of the Year in 2006 and set UT freshman records for victories by a QB (10) and TD passes (29).

Also a standout off the field, he received the 2009 Bobby Bowden Award (Fellowship of Christian Athletes) and was a National Football Foundation (NFF) Scholar-Athlete and three-time first-team Academic All-Big 12 selection. He also was a member of the AFCA Good Works team for his community service efforts. He graduated in December, 2009 with a degree in sports management.

A third-round selection by the Cleveland Browns in the 2010 NFL Draft, McCoy just completed his 12th NFL season. That's second only to Pro and College Football Hall of Famer Bobby Layne's 15 NFL seasons for a Longhorn quarterback. Currently a member of the Arizona Cardinals, McCoy has also played for the Browns (2010-12), San Francisco 49ers (2013), Washington Redskins (2014-19) and New York Giants (2020). He has played in 52 career games with 33 starts and thrown for 7,195 yards and 33 TDs, while also rushing for 546 yards and two TDs.

McCoy was recently included on the ballot for the Texas Sports Hall of Fame and was enshrined in the Big Country Athletic Hall of Fame in 2015.

 

  • Hook 'Em 3
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Texas High School Football Hall of Fame: Colt McCoy's small-town roots anchored his work ethic

From the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame: Meet the Class of 2022 series

Brice Cherry     May 6, 2022

Quote

It’s completely possible to make it big even when you come from the smallest of towns.

Hometowns don’t get much more humble than Tuscola, Texas, where Colt McCoy grew up. The town, which is located some 20 miles south of Abilene, has a population of just over 700 people. There’s a post office and a convenience store and a few other businesses. Of course, Tuscola is also home to Jim Ned High School, where McCoy’s fire for the game of football was forged.

It still burns today, after his award-winning run as the star quarterback at the University of Texas, and as he approaches his 13th season in the NFL.

“I went to a really small school, so I played all the sports,” McCoy said. “But, obviously, football was my passion and my joy, what I wanted to do. I still can’t believe I’m still playing. But as a kid, you dream about those kinds of things. It’s been a fun ride, for sure.”

Colt was a coach’s kid, as his father Brad was the head coach of the Jim Ned Indians in those days. Playing for your dad can sometimes set up a tricky balancing act, but Colt navigated it well.

“I have a great relationship with my dad and he was a great coach,” McCoy said. “Loved playing for him. Obviously you had to earn everything that came your way. There were no freebies or handouts anywhere. I also had a great relationship with the coaches on his staff. As a coach’s kid you’re around those coaches and families pretty much on a daily basis.”

It didn’t hurt that Jim Ned won a lot. With Colt flinging darts at the helm at quarterback, the Indians reached the Class 2A Division I state championship game his junior year of 2003. While they lost to San Augustine, 28-7, in that state final, the Jim Ned players had already formed lifelong bonds that McCoy still appreciates today.

“Tons of memories. I think high school and college — at least college when I was in school, it was so pure,” McCoy said. “It’s your boys, it’s your friends. In high school, nobody is getting cut, nobody is getting released. You’re in it together. There’s such a camaraderie there. I’m still friends with tons of my high school teammates, still keep in touch with them.”

McCoy was twice named the Class 2A Player of the Year in state and finished his high school run as the 2A state record-holder for career passing yards with 9,344. (That record has since been broken.) He also started at free safety his first two years until a concussion while delivering a big lick prompted the end of his defensive assignments. But he still punted all four years — even if he usually petitioned his dad and the other coaches to go for it on fourth down.

“I think I was all right,” Colt said, laughing, when asked about his punting abilities. “I hated punting when we had to punt. I was mad. I wanted to go for it every time. I popped that ball as hard as I could.”

Mack Brown recruited McCoy to Texas, ushering the young quarterback into a whole new world, one bigger than he had ever dreamed. McCoy said he still considers himself blessed that Brown gave him a chance. Especially because there were times early on in Austin where he admittedly felt he didn’t belong.

And yet it all played out better than he could have hoped.

“It just happened to work out where Vince (Young) and the team won a national championship my freshman year, the year I was redshirting,” McCoy said. “Then all of the sudden I had the opportunity if I won the job to play for four years. That’s what happened. You couldn’t write that script. That doesn’t happen very often. Especially nowadays and especially at a highly successful, prestigious university like Texas.”

McCoy demonstrated himself as a gutsy, tough leader for the Longhorns over the course of his college career. He ended up accumulating more than 13,000 career passing yards and twice was named an All-American. He considered turning pro after his junior year but returned for the 2009 season, because he thought the Longhorns had a serious shot to compete for a national championship.

And he was right. McCoy led Texas to a 12-0 regular season, then a win over Nebraska in the Big 12 championship game to send the team to the BCS Championship Game against Alabama.

Unfortunately for McCoy, he injured his shoulder on UT’s first drive of the game and had to exit, sending true freshman Garrett Gilbert into the fray. Alabama won the game, 37-21, and Colt said he struggled for years to get over the disappointment of the feeling that he let his team down.

“I really struggled with how it affected my teammates and my coaches,” McCoy said. “Because that was that the biggest stage of our career. And I just hated not being there for them. That’s what I always have nightmares about. I could get over stuff for myself.

“That was a hard deal, and I think that anytime people go through that they’ve got to back and lean on whatever it is they fall back to. For me, that’s always been my faith, my family and almost all the way back to the way I grew up, with all the coaches that my dad always had around us. Family, community and church — I just feel blessed for that.”

McCoy said he still endures near-daily physical therapy because of that shoulder injury suffered against Alabama. But he considers himself blessed to still be playing football. He has carved out a long NFL career, primarily as a backup, and said he thoroughly enjoys his current setup with the Arizona Cardinals.

At 35, McCoy knows he has more NFL years behind him than he has in front of him. He said he typically has tunnel vision when it comes to his career, but he has considered the idea of going into coaching or broadcasting after his playing days are over. He also wants to spend more time with his family, which includes his wife Rachel and four children.

“I’m not closing the door to anything,” McCoy said.

He was flabbergasted when he got the news last fall that he had earned enshrinement into the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame. That’s just not something you think about when you’re growing up in Tuscola, Texas. Then again, this small-town kid managed to achieve plenty of other big dreams by becoming a quarterback for the Texas Longhorns and in the NFL, so why not?

“I kind of thought, ‘No way,’” McCoy said. “I don’t think I really understood I was getting awarded this. I was so pumped. … I was also in the middle of a season, so it was kind of like, ‘Wow, that’s amazing!’ Then I got back into my game plan for whoever we were playing that week. I just feel very humbled. There’s so many deserving players in high school football, especially in the 2000s, the group I’m being inducted in. I’m just grateful.”

 

 

Edited by LTtxfan
  • Hook 'Em 2
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
39 minutes ago, jettrink said:

You know, the more I think about it, we should all have to wear TTU gear at the game, at home or tailgates!  This bullshit is ridiculous.

Why don't we all just get Raider Rash while we're at it.  This timeline sucks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/5/2022 at 8:16 AM, LTtxfan said:

FZhABxvWYAEr-9j?format=jpg&name=large

Quan came back and fuckin smoked one of those Ohio state defensive players. We may have wandered a desert now for 12 years but when I close my eyes I can still see those 05 & 09 teams just whippin peoples asses all over the field. Ced griffin knocking that usc fullbacks helmet clean off his damn head, quan laying that blOwU DB smooth the fuck out for Shipley haha. I miss those teams, dearly. 

  • Hook 'Em 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...

If you have Sirius/XM, look up the "Off Campus" show from yesterday on the app.  Colt is a host for the last 2 hours of the show and Sark comes in for a segment.  If I heard it correctly, Colt may come back next Tuesday as well.  Guess he is prepping for life after football.  He's got a lot of work to do!  Lots of 'you know' to start out a sentence.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...