Jump to content
Neonmoon

Voting Information : Links & Stuff

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, StassneyHorn said:

 

50 - 46 = 4 states.  Who are they, I wonder?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

re: college students...if they request absentee ballots from their home counties, but then end up being in their home county on election day after all bc of covid (i.e. campus shutdowns which i think are highly likely before thanksgiving)...can they still use their mail on ballots from home? or could they then vote in person even though they requested an absentee ballot?

i mean, it's so fucking obvious they have gone out of their way to make voting as difficult as possible for college students... can't imagine why 🙄

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^

That's how Charlie Kirk got his start in politics. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Early voting worked good for me in my area. They had it set up with safety in mind. I guess I'll got this route again. I just have to bring my cheat sheet on who I picked like last time and try and pick a mid-day time. Hopefully, it won't be a long wait. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mchookem said:

re: college students...if they request absentee ballots from their home counties, but then end up being in their home county on election day after all bc of covid (i.e. campus shutdowns which i think are highly likely before thanksgiving)...can they still use their mail on ballots from home? or could they then vote in person even though they requested an absentee ballot?

i mean, it's so fucking obvious they have gone out of their way to make voting as difficult as possible for college students... can't imagine why 🙄

 

If you're in Texas you can take your absentee ballot with you to the booth and get rid of it there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Early voting starts Tuesday October 13, 2020

When is the best time to go for the least amount of people?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Neonmoon said:

Early voting starts Tuesday October 13, 2020

When is the best time to go for the least amount of people?

I am just going to drive past my polling place on the way too and from work for a few days and pop in when it looks empty. If that doesn’t present an opportunity I’ll take an earlier lunch and try that a few times. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Neonmoon said:

Early voting starts Tuesday October 13, 2020

When is the best time to go for the least amount of people?

Dunno. But I will be at the nearest polling location to my house 30 minutes before voting starts on October 13.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to always vote on Election Day. Not anymore. That shit ended in 2018. Vote as early as you can. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, this is not a great year for the "(takes a sip of cocoa) I just like voting on Election Day proper.  It just feels more fulfilling than early voting (takes a sip of cocoa and pets their cat)"  

Serious question---there was a great app for a few elections that basically had the red/yellow/green icons at myriad polling stations so you could see in relative real time, which place you could hit up over lunch/after work/whatever during early voting.  But I didn't see it running during 2018 or during this year's primaries.  Anybody know the one I'm talking about?  Because a lot of Texans could stand to have that app link pushed to their phones.  Far more helpful, IMO, than most of the other dumb election shit that goes out to mobile users.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Lobo said:

Yeah, this is not a great year for the "(takes a sip of cocoa) I just like voting on Election Day proper.  It just feels more fulfilling than early voting (takes a sip of cocoa and pets their cat)"  

Serious question---there was a great app for a few elections that basically had the red/yellow/green icons at myriad polling stations so you could see in relative real time, which place you could hit up over lunch/after work/whatever during early voting.  But I didn't see it running during 2018 or during this year's primaries.  Anybody know the one I'm talking about?  Because a lot of Texans could stand to have that app link pushed to their phones.  Far more helpful, IMO, than most of the other dumb election shit that goes out to mobile users.  

It was running during 2018 and the primaries and run off this year.

https://countyclerk.traviscountytx.gov/elections/wait-time-map.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Neonmoon said:

Early voting starts Tuesday October 13, 2020

When is the best time to go for the least amount of people?

 

I always avoid the 1st week and the last couple of days

But then again, it’s usually only two weeks.

So I think the second week of early voting this year is going to have very low #’s. Should be the sweet spot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Neonmoon said:

Early voting starts Tuesday October 13, 2020

When is the best time to go for the least amount of people?

Oct 12.

 

Nah seriously, mid morning 9:30 to 10'ish has been my best luck.  The closer your get to closing day, typically the lines are longer.  Since Texas expanded early voting, I have not voted on election day, per se.  Early voting is a big help, IMHO.

I am digging the drop off process of mail-in ballots too.

Edited by slorch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://registertexas.com

This site will take you to a TDP sponsored site which will check your current registration status and send you the voter registration application already addressed to your county Election Administrator.

844-TX-VOTES is the TDP voter hotline to ask questions, or report problems.  It's a popular service.  It's 5 PM Saturday and there are 8 calls in front of me.   

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/14/2020 at 3:47 PM, Neonmoon said:

Props for starting this!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, mchookem said:

re: college students...if they request absentee ballots from their home counties, but then end up being in their home county on election day after all bc of covid (i.e. campus shutdowns which i think are highly likely before thanksgiving)...can they still use their mail on ballots from home? or could they then vote in person even though they requested an absentee ballot?

i mean, it's so fucking obvious they have gone out of their way to make voting as difficult as possible for college students... can't imagine why 🙄

 

 

6 hours ago, StassneyHorn said:

If you're in Texas you can take your absentee ballot with you to the booth and get rid of it there.

Stassney is right. In fact they will probably request you go home and get it to turn it in.   If you have lost it, then they can do a provisional ballot for you.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Somebody a week or so ago also had concern about those being displaced due to evictions, etc.   

 

Here's the response I got from the Voter Protection Group of TDP:

Quote

Thanks for flagging this concern. There are existing provisions for these scenarios. Unhoused folks can register to vote wherever they consider their residence. If a voter has no address, they can list the address at which the applicant receives mail and a concise description of the location of the applicant’s residence (e.g., the northwest corner of Main Street and Elm).
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For any of you that wish to be of service, one of the best things that you can do this election is register as a poll worker.  Traditionally elderly are poll workers but due to COVID concerns, they'll have difficulty working at polling stations this year.  So your assistance is needed.  You can help alleviate longer lines due to DOTARDS antics and be sure and post here any shenanigans that you encounter.  I registered in Maryland to help do my part and maybe consider it if you're looking for a way to contribute.  It's paid but brace for a 15 hour day.      

https://www.eac.gov/voters/become-poll-worker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure why people are so afraid to go to the actual poling location.

Very few people are staying home by the looks of shopping center parking lots, traffic and the grocery store.

Just wear a mask and go vote.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, pyrohornIII said:

Here's a link to a great article that breaks down how to vote in all states:

I won't even attempt to quote it into here, because it has loads of graphics.

https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/how-to-vote-2020/?fbclid=IwAR3xzF7a40u1mxIceQSmQ7HgUIpmhR9eTug18yBMBkOc33yNAZmrgTp2tEM

 

Again, they forget to say in Texas your "disability" is subjective and cannot be checked.  Whatever, I'm going to vote in person anyway, but @StassneyHorn knows what's up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your medical info is private and can’t be used to verify your decision for disability, what you decide is a disability or condition that will get worse by showing up is enough justification. Just check it and go on with life if you want to vote absentee.

Your disability decision is the equivalent of a teacher asking you what grade you want on your paper and giving it to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the legal definition of disability also includes a physical or mental hindering of your ability to move.  

If you think you've been exposed to the virus in the 15 days prior to early voting and/or election day, the very government that says you can't vote by mail does say to self-quarantine at home.  So what are you supposed to do then?  Hint, request a ballot in advance and say you went to a grocery store at some point in October.  Both of which are true for 99% of Americans.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Biff Tannen said:

Again, they forget to say in Texas your "disability" is subjective and cannot be checked.  Whatever, I'm going to vote in person anyway, but @StassneyHorn knows what's up.

Oh, I agree with that.  I know there is ambiguity in the language.   But I can't personally encourage people to take advantage of it.    

I have long advocated (for those who physically can):

Vote in person

vote early 

and vote all the way down the ballot.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

MyTexasVotes.com

A great site that breaks down all the different areas of voting.  Pretty much encompasses everything from "Am I registered?" to how and where to vote.

Some counties do county wide voting and others only vote by precinct.  This site will tell you all the places you can vote and when.   Both early voting and election day.

 

Edited by pyrohornIII

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will the Post Offices be able to deliver ALL of the mailed-in ballots to the polling sites so that they can be timely counted.....assuming the voters get them to the Post Office in a timely manner?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/15/2020 at 10:53 AM, Neonmoon said:

Early voting starts Tuesday October 13, 2020

When is the best time to go for the least amount of people?

In Travis County, it is on the weekend during early voting.  Specifically, on Sundays.  If the NFL is playing, record the game and go vote.  Early voting is starting early this year, there may be multiple weekends to vote.

Travis County puts up a great website at www.votetravis.com .  You can see polling wait times and pick the place with the lowest lines in real time.  In Travis County, you can vote at any polling place in the county, even on Election Day.

You can print a personalized ballot on their website.  To help others, print one out and mark your choices ahead of time, then bring your printout with you to the polls.  You will vote faster and help move the line along for others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Cairn Horn88 said:

Will the Post Offices be able to deliver ALL of the mailed-in ballots to the polling sites so that they can be timely counted.....assuming the voters get them to the Post Office in a timely manner?

What we are being told is the mail delay, as it stands now, is a couple of days, not weeks.  It could get worse,  but if people mail in their ballots in a timely manner, then the USPS can handle it.    One problem is a lot of people hold their ballots until the very end and then send them, for whatever reason.   Please advise everyone you know who votes by mail to take their time to complete the ballots correctly, but to turn them around in a with some immediacy. 

If they applied for a VBM ballot, but didn't receive it in a week's time, then they need to call their county EA.

VBM Ballots actually all go into the Election Administrator or County Clerk's office (some counties have an EA, and some don't, so it falls on the CC).    Some counties are offering drop boxes and curb side service at the EA office.  I'd suggest you call your county EA and ask what they are doing.  

Go to mytexasvotes.com  to find the number for your EA.  That page also has a lot of information about voting in general.  Plus the hotline number. 

Also, EA's are required by law to post what mail in ballots they have received.  The timing and method of said postings is vague.  Some counties do a great job of this, and others less so.  That's another question you could ask while you have them on the phone.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When are mail-in ballot sent out?  

I sent in an application a couple of weeks ago.  Should I have received one already?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Beau Vine said:

When are mail-in ballot sent out?  

I sent in an application a couple of weeks ago.  Should I have received one already?

Each county is different.   Here's a link that lists all the Election Admins by county.   I suggest giving them a call and 1) verify they received your application, and 2) ask when their  schedule for mailing ballots.

https://www.sos.state.tx.us/elections/voter/county.shtml

Other questions to ask are:

How do they track ballots?  And how and when do they post notifications of received ballots.

What are their expected procedures for those dropping off VBM ballots instead of mailing?  Where and when can they do that?    

Like I said, some counties are being very helpful and others are being less so, some way less so.  Asking them directly is the best answer.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm worried about Travis County. I've never seem the county beg for facilities to volunteer for voting locations like this. The problem is you have to commit to the full 3 weeks if you do early voting since the ledge put an end to mobile voting sites that are only up for a single day but travel across the city.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/21/2020 at 1:52 PM, Beau Vine said:

When are mail-in ballot sent out?  

I sent in an application a couple of weeks ago.  Should I have received one already?

For anyone else, I called about this, and Hays County says they'll begin sending out the ballots on 9/18.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you requested a mail in ballot and don't trust the Postal Service with everything going on right now, you can hand deliver it at the County Clerk's office, NOT your polling place.

https://www.texastribune.org/2020/08/21/vote-by-mail-texas/

"Texans voting absentee can also deliver their completed ballots in person at their county elections office instead of mailing them in. That’s typically only allowed while polls are open on Election Day, but the state has expanded that option during the pandemic to allow voters to return their ballots in person as soon as they’re completed. Those voters will need to present photo ID when dropping off their ballots."

If you requested a vote by mail ballot, but changed your mind and want to vote in person, early or on Election day, go to your polling place and surrender your ballot there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did anyone find out when Travis is mailing out ballots?  I requested one, but am planning on voting in person now.  I still need to take it with me when I go right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/31/2020 at 5:57 PM, Biff Tannen said:

Did anyone find out when Travis is mailing out ballots?  I requested one, but am planning on voting in person now.  I still need to take it with me when I go right?

Here's a page on it.  If that won't answer your questions, then I am sure they would field your questions in a call.  But dropping off a ballot is as effective as using the machine.   Each ballot is tracked with it's own unique barcode and number, so the system is designed to account for every ballot.

https://countyclerk.traviscountytx.gov/elections/ballot-by-mail.html

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://advancementproject.org/what-to-do-if-you-experience-intimidation-at-the-polls/

 

Quote

If you’re a voter wondering what you should do if you feel intimidated or targeted at the polls, you are not alone. Here are six things you should do if you experience or witness intimidation.

1. It’s ILLEGAL! First things first, it’s important to know that voter intimidation is a federal crime; you will go to jail. “Whoever intimidates, threatens, coerces, or attempts to intimidate, threaten, or coerce, any other person for the purpose of interfering with the right of such other person to vote or to vote as he may choose, or of causing such other person to vote for, or not to vote for, any candidate for the office of President, Vice President, Presidential elector, Member of the Senate, Member of the House of Representatives, Delegate from the District of Columbia, or Resident Commissioner, at any election held solely or in part for the purpose of electing such candidate, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both,” reads 18 U.S. Code Section 594.

2. Do not be intimidated if your vote is challenged

Voter challenger laws vary from state to state. In most states, challengers must provide election officials at the polls with a valid reason. Challenges cannot be made for discriminatory reasons such as race, ethnicity, language ability or gender. Unless the challenger presents affirmative proof that a voter is not qualified, election officials must consider a voter’s registration valid. Challengers may enter the voting space to explain a challenge, but must leave as soon as their challenge is heard. In the case that your vote is challenged, you have a right to hear from the precinct judge before the polls close. Check with your local Board of Elections to find the rules and procedures challengers must abide to in your state.

3. Alert the municipal Clerk or Election Officials at polling locations

On Election Day, administrators will be present on polling sites to oversee election operations. In the case that you experience or witness intimidations at the polls, notify your local election official at your polling place. Election officials (poll workers) are responsible for administering election procedures in each polling place. Generally speaking, their assigned duties include issuing ballots to registered voters, registering voters, monitoring the voting equipment, explaining how to mark the ballot or use the voting equipment or counting votes. The municipal clerk is an election administrator and, as such, should be available to poll workers on Election Day for advice, supplies, and additional support.

4. Call Election Protection at 866-OUR-VOTE

In addition to notifying local authorities, voters concerned that they are being targeted should immediately call the Election Protection Hotline at 1(866)-OUR-VOTE. Voter helplines are led by the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. For Spanish speakers, the number is (888)-Ve-Y-Vota protection efforts are led by trained professionals at the NALEO Educational Fund, The number for Asian language speakers is (888)-API-VOTE (led by APIAVote & Asian Americans Advancing Justice-AAJC).

5. Document the conduct

One of the most important steps you can take if you experience or witness voter intimidation is to report the incident to your local County Board of Elections and County District Attorney. In your report, be sure to list the date, time and location of the incident. Each County Commission is required to investigate alleged violations and report them to the District Attorney, who has the authority to prosecute violations. See something, say something and write it ALL down.

6. Don’t confront the intimidator

For witnesses of voter intimidation, it is important for your safety and safety of others to not confront the intimidator. There are several reasons for why this would do more harm than good. For starters, this confrontation could alienate the voter further by bringing more attention to the situation. It could also intimidate other voters nearby. The biggest reason for not confronting the intimidator is that it raises the chances of police getting involved. This could be more intimidating than the initial encounter. For voters with previous felony conviction, who may be voting for the first time, police presence can be incredibly daunting. The best way to support someone who is being discriminated against on Election Day is to participate in the steps previously mentioned.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard to believe early voting in Texas starts in just 5 weeks.  Just 34 days from today.  

I have a feeling my new polling location (one we used for runoffs a few months back) is going to be a heated location with some folks attempting shenanigans.  The Burger Center. Due to a lot of the usual right-leaning West Austin polling locations closing down for Covid-19, and it being right in the heart of left-leaning South Austin, I think it'll make for an interesting mix as many different parts of town confluence.  We're right in between those two parts of town, our 'hood is pretty much 50/50 at this point...but we all gotta head over there to vote (technically City Hall is closer, but Burger Center was/is much safer to vote in terms of spacing).  Anyway, I think they leave downtown alone, I think East Austin and parts of North Austin are settled science to polling location disruptors.  You don't put white assholes at East Austin polling locations, it sticks out too much.  You just rely on traditional suppression techniques like voter roll bullshit.  But I could see a little army of dipshits at the Burger Center, if they do their research, because it attracts such a wide swath of Austin voters of so many political ilks.  I dunno.  The official list of voting locations, due to Pandemic, is still being worked on by Travis County Clerk but supposed to be ready in a couple weeks.  

Might be fun for one to pretend that they are a "Polling Location Supervisor's Supervisor."  Not the actual volunteers, I'm talking about the kind of people we all know are gonna be out at these places in october/november.  The people that have been led to believe they are shepherds of democracy.  Could be fun to head out there and convince them you are from one particular campaign, sent out there to bring them water and see how they were doing with their monumental task.  Maybe get their names while you're out there so can report back to campaign HQ on what a great job they're doing.  Just an idea.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right, but people are typically more inclined to vote somewhere near home/work.  I guess Randall's were also an option if you were out grocery shopping at the worst grocery chain in Central Texas, but for the most part we voted near house/office, maybe where we drop the kids at school.  Most non-government buildings were closed down for run-offs/special elections in June.  They will continue to be for the early voting period & Election Day.  As such, people will be going a little farther away than usual to cast their in-person ballots.  And polling locations, while being able to handle volume, will be fewer and far between in terms of physical footprint.  That's just the reality of Autumn 2020.  As such, I think you'll see more blended demographics/zip codes coming into particular election locations.  It won't be as cut and dry as it used to be based on which Randall's or which library you were voting at.  You'll see more harassment this time around at places that are a little more of a question mark.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...