Jump to content
satyanash

The 2010s: Texas Longhorns' all-decade team

Recommended Posts

Thoughts/discussion?

(Jeff Howe) Texas All-Decade Team: Best Longhorns on offense in the 2010s

Quote

The 2010s won’t be remembered fondly when it comes to what Texas accomplished on offense. Nevertheless, the decade that will conclude for the program when the current Longhorns face Utah in the Alamo Bowl on New Year’s Eve has produced quality players on offense.

While there were only two All-Americans to emerge on the aforementioned side of the ball since the start of the 2010 season, they’re both on the squad. Aside from current players (of which there are four who can be considered among the decade’s best player at their respective positions), each of the Longhorns who were picked for the squad by the Horns247 staff (Chip Brown, Bobby Burton, Taylor Estes, Jeff Howe and Mike Roach with input from 247Sports national writer and former Texas beat writer Kevin Flaherty) and exhausted their eligibility were active-roster NFL players (six were still active throughout the 2019 season.

To be eligible for the team, all a player had to do was play at least one season in the current decade beginning with the 2010 season opener (players are listed only by the seasons in which they’ve played since then). From there, it was up to the Horns247 staff to look at the body of work and determine at each position which Longhorns were the best of the best in a decade where the program’s offense put together enough good stretches of play to allow some top-notch players to shine.

* denotes player played in the previous decade, although those seasons aren’t listed

Offensive Player of the Decade

— Sam Ehlinger, QB, 2017-Present

Quarterback is the most important position on the field and it took Texas nearly the entire decade to find an answer in Ehlinger, who is responsible for more wins (19) as a starter than any of the program’s quarterbacks since Colt McCoy. Along with the wins, Ehlinger heads into the Alamo Bowl ranking behind only McCoy on the school’s all-time charts for career completions (817), passing yards (8,669), total offense (10,126 yards), passing touchdowns (65) and touchdowns responsible for (89).

The numbers speak for themselves and when the offense has been geared to maximize what Ehlinger does best, the Longhorns have been a tough out. Thanks to Ehlinger, Texas heads into the next decade miles better at quarterback than where the program was when the current decade started.

Quarterback

— Sam Ehlinger (2017-Present)

David Ash (2012) and Shane Buechele (2016) had single seasons where the Longhorns got quarterback play that could be considered league average in the Big 12 when looking at the body of work. That’s what makes Ehlinger’s two-season run impressive and it’s even more so when the highlights of his true freshman campaign in 2017 (487 yards of total offense in a win over Kansas State and 386 total yards in his first Oklahoma game) give him a three-year career where he’s given the Longhorns a chance to win more often than not.

Running Backs

— Malcolm Brown (2011-2014), D'Onta Foreman (2014-2016)

Foreman is an obvious choice given that his 2016 season (2,028 yards, 6.3 yards per attempt, 15 touchdowns) where he was a consensus All-American and won the Doak Walker Award as the nation’s top running back is one of the best ever put together by a Texas runner. There’s a significant gap between Foreman and the rest of the backs the Longhorns have put on the field since the start of the 2010 season and it’s hard to imagine what kind of numbers he’d have if he hadn’t missed time over his first two seasons in the program due to injuries.

A two-time second-team All-Big 12 selection, Brown (2,678 yards, 24 touchdowns) gets the nod for the second slot in the backfield. When Johnathan Gray suffered a season-ending Achilles injury down the stretch of the 2013 season, Brown proved he was back from a disappointing 2012 campaign by recording career-high marks in carries (214), rushing yards (904) and rushing touchdowns (nine) while averaging 129.7 yards per game and five yards per attempt over the final three games of his best season as a Longhorn.

Tight End

— Andrew Beck (2014-2016, 2018)

The 28 receptions and 281 yards Beck logged in 2018 — one season removed from a series of foot injuries that cost him all of 2017 and threatened to derail his career — were the single-season highs for a Texas tight end in the decade. While Beck proved himself to be a reliable threat in the passing game, especially if unaccounted for, his ability as a blocker not only helped Ehlinger set a school record for rushing touchdowns by a quarterback in 2018 (16, none from longer than 16 yards out) but also netted him first-team All-Big 12 honors as a fullback and made Texas one of the best short-yardage offenses in the country.

Wide Receivers

— Devin Duvernay (2016-2019), Marquise Goodwin (*2010-2012), Lil'Jordan Humphrey (2016-2018)

Goodwin’s Texas career isn’t remembered for the numbers he put up. The three seasons that followed his true freshman campaign saw him catch only 90 passes and he didn’t record his first 100-yard receiving game until the 32nd game of his career (the regular-season finale in 2011).

Nevertheless, when Goodwin flashed in games like the Baylor game his junior season (five catches for 129 yards and a touchdown) or in his senior season against Ole Miss (four offensive touches, 182 total yards and two touchdowns) and Oregon State (five touches, 132 total yards and two touchdowns), he showed why he might be the player most impacted by the program’s offensive issues in the early part of the decade. The bottom line is Goodwin’s production shouldn’t take away from the fact that he did enough to emerge as the program’s highest-drafted offensive skill prospect of the decade (third round, No. 78 overall in 2013).

Duvernay is in the midst of one of the two best statistical seasons a Texas wide receiver has ever had with 103 catches (No. 2), 1,294 yards receiving (No. 2) and eight receiving touchdowns (No. 10) heading into the upcoming bowl game. Duvernay also developed as a player, evolving from someone who was exclusively a vertical threat early in his career to a well-rounded wideout as his time in the program comes to a close.

Humphrey proved to be an impossible matchup when put on the field in a full-time role in his final season in burnt orange. Recording 86 receptions for 1,176 yards and nine touchdowns is an impressive line for the 2018 season (or any season for that matter), but it doesn’t begin to truly describe the impact Humphrey had on the offense.

Offensive Line

— Center: Zach Shackelford (2016-2019)

It’s hard to argue with a list of career achievements that include being named a Freshman All-American and a two-time first-team All-Big 12 selection. Shackelford’s career includes 37 career starts, a number that should go to 38 when the Longhorns take on Utah next week in San Antonio.

— Guards, Tackles: Samuel Cosmi (2018-Present), Trey Hopkins (2010-2013), Donald Hawkins (2012-2013), David Snow (*2010-2011), Connor Williams (2015-2017)

Like Ehlinger at quarterback and Foreman at running back, Williams was a no-brainer selection for the squad. Even though his 2017 season was impacted by a knee injury, Williams was a Freshman All-American in 2015 and was a consensus All-American the following season as a true sophomore. When Williams had everything clicking, few Texas linemen since the turn of the century have been better.

Hopkins was a first-team All-Big 12 pick in 2013 (a second-team choice in 2012) and probably would’ve been drafted had he not suffered a leg injury late in his senior season due to the career he put together (42 starts over four seasons at both guard and tackle). He and Hawkins (a second-team All-Big 12 selection in 2013) formed a formidable left side of the offensive line in their final season together in the program.

The biggest impact Hawkins made on the program, however, is proving that junior college prospects could thrive on the Forty Acres. Snow played multiple positions for the Longhorns, but he played the best football of his career at left guard in 2011. That’s the position where Snow earned second-team All-Big 12 recognition and started all 13 games in a season where the Longhorns enjoyed the program’s fifth-best season running the football (202.6 yards per game) since 2005.

Cosmi started 13 games at right tackle as a redshirt freshman and will equal that number at left tackle for his sophomore season when the Alamo Bowl rolls around. A Freshman All-American (2018) and a second-team All-Big 12 pick (2019) already in his career, Cosmi will enter the next decade as the program’s bell cow up front.

All-Purpose Player

— Fozzy Whittaker (*2010-2011)

Would the 2011 team have been a 10-win club if Whittaker stayed healthy the entire season? That’s obviously up for debate, but what can’t be debated is Whittaker’s impact on the final Texas squad he suited up for given how things fell off a cliff offensively when a knee injury (thanks to the putrid Missouri turf) ended his career with the Longhorns.

In nine games (eight full) in 2011, Whittaker ran for 366 yards (5.8 yards per attempt) and six touchdowns, caught 16 passes for 145 yards and a touchdown and ran two kickoffs back for touchdowns. For an offense that lacked a consistent presence at quarterback once it became clear the attempted reboot of the career of Garrett Gilbert wasn’t going to work out, Whittaker’s ability to successfully the Wildcat package gave Bryan Harsin something he could build around offensively.

(Jeff Howe) Texas All-Decade Team: Best Longhorns on defense in the 2010s

Quote

When Horns247 released the offensive version of the Texas All-Decade Team for the 2010s, some of the position groups required a lot of work in order to get them fully filled out with worthy recipients. The defensive side of the ball, however, is different due to a Big 12 Defensive Lineman of the Year, four first-team All-Big 12 selections, a Big 12 Defensive Freshman of the Year, four NFL draft choices and an eventual Pro Bowl selection getting left off of the squad.

Under Will Muschamp, Manny Diaz, Vance Bedford and Todd Orlando the Longhorns fielded some tremendous defenses throughout the decade with the 2011, 2014 and 2017 groups carrying largely forgettable Texas offenses to bowl berths in each of those campaigns. Members of each of the program’s four defensive regimes are represented on the Texas All-Decade Team, a squad voted on by the Horns247 staff (Chip Brown, Bobby Burton, Taylor Estes, Jeff Howe and Mike Roach with input from 247Sports national writer and former Texas beat writer Kevin Flaherty) and included on the defensive team are the All-Decade choices for kicker and punter.

As was the case with the offensive team, eligibility for the team meant all a player had to do was play at least one season in the current decade beginning with the 2010 season opener (players are listed only by the seasons in which they’ve played since then). It was up to the Horns247 staff to go from there and determine at each position which Longhorns were the best of the best in a decade where Texas played elite defense for stretches.

* denotes player played in the previous decade, although those seasons aren’t listed

Defensive Player of the Decade

— Alex Okafor, DE, *2010-2012

There wasn’t a clear-cut choice for the honor of being considered the top defender of the decade in the Texas program. There were several worthy candidates, but Okafor was the pick based on the first-team All-American honor bestowed upon him in 2011, the two consensus first-team All-Big 12 selections he earned (a unanimous selection by the league’s coaches in 2011) and his final game for the program — 4.5 sacks, six tackles for loss in the 2012 Alamo Bowl win over Oregon State — was arguably the most dominant single-game effort by a Texas defender since the start of the 2010 season. Who did Okafor beat out for the top honor?

Jackson Jeffcoat (60 career tackles for loss trail only Derrick Johnson’s 65 for the most in program history and his 27.5 career sacks rank seventh), Malcom Brown (2014 consensus first-team All-American, 2014 consensus first-team All-Big 12), Jordan Hicks (2014 second-team All-American, 2014 second-team All-Big 12 after suffering season-ending injuries in 2012 and 2013), Quandre Diggs (37 pass breakups and 11 interceptions both place him in the top 10 on both career statistical charts) and Kenny Vaccaro (2012 All-American, Duane Akina’s sixth and final first-round draft choice as the program’s defensive backs coach) received consideration.

Defensive Line

— Sam Acho (*2010), Malcom Brown (2012-2014), Poona Ford (2014-2017), Jackson Jeffcoat (2010-2013), Alex Okafor (*2010-2012)

Unlike some position groups on offense where a deep dive was required to fill out the team, the trouble with putting together a defensive line for an All-Decade Team was figuring out who would be left out. Acho (2010 All-American, 2010 first-team All-Big 12, 2010 first-team Academic All-American, 2010 Campbell Trophy winner), Brown (2014 Nagurski and Outland Trophy finalist), Jeffcoat (2013 consensus first-team All-American, 2013 Ted Hendricks Award winner, 2013 Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year) and Okafor (19.5 sacks, 29 tackles for loss over his final two seasons) were no-brainer selections.

That meant one of two Longhorns to earn Big 12 Defensive Lineman of the Year recognition (Ford in 2017 and Charles Omenihu in 2018) was going to be left off the list. As good as Omenihu was (it’s almost painful to think about how many more sacks he would’ve had than the 9.5 he posted had he been maximized as a pass rusher), Ford was arguably the biggest reason why the 2017 defense not only had one of the best turnaround seasons in the country but was also able to prop up a putrid offense en route to Texas winning seven games in the first season of the Tom Herman era. Omenihu, Kheeston Randall, Chris Whaley, Cedric Reed, Hassan Ridgeway and Breckyn Hager were all worthy of being considered for one of the five spots on the team.

Linebackers

— Emmanuel Acho (*2010-2011), Jordan Hicks (2010-2014), Malik Jefferson (2015-2017), Keenan Robinson (*2010-2011)

Though not as loaded as the defensive line group, each of the linebackers recognized went on to become an NFL draft pick after posted gaudy numbers for the Longhorns.

The list begins with Acho, a 2011 first-team All-Big 12 selection and finalist for both the Lott IMPACT Trophy and the Wuerffel Trophy who recorded 218 tackles, 31 tackles for loss, six sacks, 12 pass breakups and 23 quarterback pressures over his final two seasons as a Longhorn. Hicks’ 147 tackles as a fifth-year senior were the most by a Longhorn in 22 years (13 tackles for loss, two interceptions in his final season in the program), proving that when healthy, he had few peers in terms of pure playmaking ability.

The greatest source of debate between the Horns247 staff members was whether Jefferson or Robinson was most deserving. The votes were split evenly — three for Jefferson, three for Robinson — and with nobody budging, the decision was made to put both on the team and recognize four linebackers instead of three. A two-time second-team All-Big 12 selection, Robinson had two consecutive seasons with 100 or more tackles (113 in 2010, 106 in 2011). A two-time Butkus Award semifinalist, Robinson’s 10 tackles and two tackles for loss in a win over Cal where the Longhorns held the Bears to seven rushing yards in his final game as a Longhorn netted him 2011 Holiday Bowl Defensive MVP honors.

Jefferson (233 tackles, 25.5 tackles for loss, 12 sacks in 34 games) arrived on the Forty Acres with massive expectations. While it’s debatable whether or not Jefferson (2015 Freshman All-American, Big 12 Defensive Freshman of the Year) fully lived up to the lofty billing over three seasons, he did his best to leave his mark on the program in a junior campaign in 2017 where he was a second-team All-American and the co-Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year while recording 110 tackles, 10 tackles for loss and four sacks.

Defensive Backs

— Carrington Byndom (2010-2013), Quandre Diggs (2011-2014), DeShon Elliott (2015-2017), Kenny Vaccaro (*2010-2012), Aaron Williams (*2010)

Diggs (2011 Freshman All-American, 2011 Big 12 Defensive Freshman of the Year, 2014 second-team All-Big 12) and Vaccaro (two-time first-team All-Big 12) were unanimous selections. Along with their accolades and production, Diggs and Vaccaro executed two of the most unforgettable individual plays of the decade: Diggs when he leveled Patrick Mahomes II in a 2014 win over Texas Tech that knocked the future NFL MVP out of the game and Vaccaro with a sack in the 2011 Holiday Bowl win over Cal where he leaped over a blocker to finish the play.
(Photo: Jerome Miron, USA TODAY Sports)

The debate ensued from there with Kris Boyd, Curtis Brown and Adrian Phillips getting brought up as possible selections. Elliott’s 2017 season alone (Jim Thorpe Award finalist, unanimous All-American, first-team All-Big 12, six interceptions) was enough to get him on the list and Byndom (two-time All-Big 12) had a 2011 season where he was a first-team All-Big 12 selection and had an argument for being considered the best cover corner in the country.

A second-team All-Big 12 selection in 2010, Williams earned a spot on the squad by using the same logic that got Marquise Goodwin selected on offense in that his talent outweighs whatever numbers he recorded. Williams did have 13 pass breakups in 2010 (46 tackles, one sack, five tackles for loss, three forced fumbles and a blocked punt), but more important was his ability to legitimately play any position at an elite level in the secondary, a group that was loaded with NFL-caliber talent in most seasons throughout the decade.

Kicker

— Justin Tucker (*2010-2011)

Can one play define a player’s career to the extent of making him an All-Decade selection? That appears to be the case for Tucker due to his 40-yard game-winning field goal in the 2011 victory over Texas A&M ending the staff discussion as Burton summed up. “I don’t care what the stats say, anybody other than Tucker is heresy at kicker,” he said. “The single kick alone is all that matters.”

For what it’s worth, Anthony Fera was a consensus first-team All-American and a Lou Groza Award finalist in 2013, but Tucker also finished his career as the third-most accurate kicker in school history (83.3 percent conversion rate) along with delivering his kick to beat the Aggies in walk-off fashion at Kyle Field.

Punter

— Michael Dickson (2015-2017)

There have been no-brainer picks for certain positions, but none are as obvious as making Dickson the punter on our squad. Aside from being a two-time first-team All-Big 12 selection, a 2016 All-American, a 2016 finalist for the Ray Guy Award and a two-time Big 12 Special Teams Player of the Year, Dickson was a unanimous All-American in 2017 and became the first player in school history to win the Ray Guy Award as the nation’s top punter that same season.

The school’s all-time leader in punting average for a single season (47.4 yards per punt in 2017) and a career (45.32 yards per punt), Dickson finished his three-year career with the Longhorns with an MVP performance in the 2017 Texas Bowl win over Missouri. He was a punter who legitimately won games for the Longhorns.

Burnt Orange Nation: Texas football’s All-Decade team results

Earlier this week, we put together a voting ballot for Burnt Orange Nation’s All-Decade team. Thanks to your participation, over a thousand votes came in on which Texas Longhorns most deserved to be included on this team. Based on the results, here’s a compiled roster of the best Texas football players from 2010-2019.

Offense

Quarterback: Sam Ehlinger (2017-19)

It comes to no surprise here but Ehlinger lead the way with 88.8 percent of the total votes. Case McCoy was second at 4.6 percent.

Running Back: D’Onta Foreman (2014-16)

The former 2,000-yard rusher was by far the most deserving option at running back. He owned over 78 percent of the votes.

Wide Receivers: Devin Duvernay (2016-19), Lil’ Jordan Humphrey (2016-18), and Marquise Goodwin (2010-12)

Duvernay led all wideouts in votes, followed by Humphrey and Goodwin. Collin Johnson made a late push, but finished fourth behind Goodwin by less than 50 votes. Duvernay and Humphrey each gathered over 66 percent of votes.

Tight End: Andrew Beck (2014-18)

In a battle between two outstanding blocking tight ends, Beck nudged out Geoff Swaim by 10 percent.

Offensive Tackles: Connor Williams (2015-17) and Samuel Cosmi (2018-19)

Interior Offensive Line: Zach Shackelford (2016-19), Patrick Vahe (2015-18), and Trey Hopkins (2010-13)

The program’s improved offensive line play towards the end of this decade under Tom Herman and offensive line coach Herb Hand represented how the votes swayed here. Williams led the way with nearly 97 percent of votes.

Defense

Defensive Tackles: Malcom Brown (2012-14) and Poona Ford (2015-17)

The two current NFL defensive tackles were the undisputed winners here. Brown and Ford each received over 80 percent of votes.

Defensive Ends: Jackson Jeffcoat (2010-13) and Charles Omenihu (2015-18)

The former Big 12 DPOY and Big 12 Defensive Lineman of the Year battled for the top spot, each received nearly 66 percent of votes. Alex Okafor was the next highest at under 33 percent. Texas produced multiple NFL-caliber defensive ends this decade.

Linebackers: Jordan Hicks (2010-14), Malik Jefferson (2015-17), and Emmanuel Acho (2010-11)

Hicks led all linebackers in voting at 82 percent. Jefferson (60.7 percent) and Acho (58.2 percent) got the nod over Gary Johnson (45.1 percent) as the other two linebackers.

Cornerbacks: Quandre Diggs (2011-14) and Holton Hill (2015-17)

Outside of punter Michael Dickson and offensive tackle Connor Williams, Diggs received more votes than anyone else on the ballot. All but 3.2 percent of voters selected him as one of their cornerbacks. Kris Boyd, Carrington Byndom, and Duke Thomas were all in contention for the second spot, but it was Holton Hill who came out on top with just 33 percent of votes.

Safeties: Kenny Vaccaro (2010-12) and DeShon Elliott (2015-17)

All-American’s Vaccaro (85.5 percent) and Elliott (40.7 percent) were the top two vote getters at safety.

Special Teams

Kicker: Justin Tucker (2010-11)

Punter: Michael Dickson (2015-17)

Return Specialist: Marquise Goodwin (2010-12)

From Tucker to Goodwin, these three players are well-deserved to highlight the Longhorns special teams.

Other

Most Underrated Longhorn: John Harris (2011-14)

Favorite Game: 2011 @ Texas A&M — W 27-25

Favorite Play: Justin Tucker game-winning ‘goodbye to A&M’ field goal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That list is so gross for an all-decade team, particularly on offense.    Every single one of our actual teams from 2001 through 2006 would have a more talented starting line up than those all decade teams.

Edited by longhornmatt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can’t wait for the obvious “all-decade team of players Texas missed or passed on” 

It might cause some suicides 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Js1 said:

Can’t wait for the obvious “all-decade team of players Texas missed or passed on” 

It might cause some suicides 

You shut your whore mouth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Case McCoy was our 2nd best QB of the decade?

The fact that we're at a first-class university in a great city, and one of the winningest programs in college football history, and one with unbelievable resources and built-in advantages... and that even *might* be true...

Holy shit.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Paul Wesley said:

Case McCoy was our 2nd best QB of the decade?

The fact that we're at a first-class university in a great city, and one of the winningest programs in college football history, and one with unbelievable resources and built-in advantages... and that even *might* be true...

Holy shit.  

Should have been Ash had Major not turned him into a drooling vegetable 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bobby Burton: Ranking the seven worst losses of the last decade for Texas

Quote

Call it the 7 worst losses of the decade, or better yet, or like breaking a mirror, seven years of bad luck. Before Tom Herman came along, the Horns were routinely outmatched and outwitted in the earlier part of the decade.

No. 1 Kansas 2016 - Kansas 24 - Texas 21 (OT)

It’s the game that decided and punctuated Charlie Strong’s abysmal tenure as Texas coach. With the Horns clinging to a lead in the fourth quarter, D’Onta Foreman fumbled the ball away in KU territory. The Jayhawks matched the length of the field to tie the game and send it to overtime where the Horns couldn’t muster any offense.

No. 2 Kansas State 2010 - K-State 39 Texas 14

If there was a single game that marked the denouement of Mack Brown’s coaching career in Austin, it was the barbaric and emphatic loss to K-State in 2010. Garrett Gilbert proved to be a turnover machine — something that plagued him throughout his Texas career — and the Horns couldn’t stop the simple QB run game. Texas was down 39-0 at the end of the third quarter.

No. 3 BYU 2014 - BYU 41 Texas 7

Dylan Haines was posterized by Taysom Hill, the memory of which will be forever etched in Longhorn memory. The contest signaled a poor start for the Charlie Strong era; the former defensive coordinator had no better answer for Hill than his predecessor.

No. 4 Notre Dame 2015 - ND 38 Texas 3

Hapless. Helpless. Incompetent. All of those could describe the worst Texas offense performance of the decade. It ultimately led to the removal of Shawn Watson as offensive coordinator and was yet another indicator that Strong was not the answer.

No. 5 Oklahoma 2012 - Oklahoma 63 Texas 21

A week after losing to West Virginia in a barn burner, the Horns headed to Dallas and promptly laid an egg. For the second consecutive year, the Horns looked helpless on both sides of the ball.

No. 6 Oklahoma State 2015 - OSU 30 Texas 27

The only “close” game on the list was a lesson in coaching ignominy and referee malfeasance. The Horns had multiple extra points blocked just a week after the team had lost a game on a missed PAT to Cal. Somehow, the Horns couldn’t be coached well enough to protect for a PAT. And late in the fourth quarter, the referees took over. Poona Ford was flagged for a non-existent holding penalty. Strong then was flagged for unsportsmanlike conduct and the Cowboys tied game on a field goal. Texas attempted to punt on its ensuing possession but Michael Dickson botched the snap and OSU won on another field goal. All this while OSU starter Mason Rudolph was quarterbacking helplessly with an injured throwing hand throughout the second half.

No. 7 Oklahoma 2011 - Oklahoma 55 Texas 17

A whitewashing too eerily reminiscent of Bob Stoops vs. Mack Brown in the early aughts. Texas couldn’t move the ball and the Sooners couldn’t be stopped. Despite all the off-season changes Brown had orchestrated, the Horns were still well behind the Okies.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didnt finish looking at all the positions before I quit reading and Im OK with not knowing. I love all our guys but once I read the title I knew it would be a depressing selection of players.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our 2nd stringers and bench from the 2005 team could have taken a lot of those spots.  Colt, Jermichael, Quan, Shipley, Ramonce, Miller, Orakpo, Kelson, Ross, Henry Shelton (NOT a RB), Dockery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, satyanash said:

Bobby Burton: Ranking the seven worst losses of the last decade for Texas

 

What? No. Absolutely not fucking reading that. Did he just write that for OU247 and TexAgs?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Redneck Mutha said:

Our 2nd stringers and bench from the 2005 team could have taken a lot of those spots.  Colt, Jermichael, Quan, Shipley, Ramonce, Miller, Orakpo, Kelson, Ross, Henry Shelton (NOT a RB), Dockery.

Henry Shelton was so good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Paul Wesley said:

Case McCoy was our 2nd best QB of the decade?

The fact that we're at a first-class university in a great city, and one of the winningest programs in college football history, and one with unbelievable resources and built-in advantages... and that even *might* be true...

Holy shit.  

Well name another qb that beat both ou and aggy this decade. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, DefinitelyNotHollywoodColt said:

The seven best wins is probably more depressing.

2010 Nebraska

2011 A&M

2013 OU

2015 OU

2016 Baylor

2018 OU

2019 Georgia 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Js1 said:

2010 Nebraska

2011 A&M

2013 OU

2015 OU

2016 Baylor

2018 OU

2019 Georgia 

ND has to be on there. All timer false dawn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, texifornia said:

ND has to be on there. All timer false dawn.

But which do you remove?

You can’t remove an OU game because beating OU >>> anything else

We kicked Nebraska out of the conference with fucking GG

Walk off versus Aggy to kick them out of the conference

2016 Baylor was #8. Sugar Bowl was pretty amazing. 

I guess you call 2016 ND/2016 Baylor a tie? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread is making me realize I’ve pretty much forgotten most of the last decade. For those of you with kids, it’s kind of like the selective memory you get about having a newborn. On a biological level I think we’re programmed to forget that shit so that we’ll keep making kids.

I forget Texas football to ensure I keep coming back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, texifornia said:

ND has to be on there. All timer false dawn.

Why? That ND team was one of their worst ever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Valmy77 said:

Why? That ND team was one of their worst ever.

That’s why I left it off of the top 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Valmy77 said:

Why? That ND team was one of their worst ever.

In terms of how important it felt at the time, it might be #1. Plus "Texas is back, folks!" was easily (and black-humorously) the call of the decade.

It might replace '13 OU.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, A’Dam Psycho said:

Honest question: would the 2000s all decade 2nd team beat the breaks off our 2010s first team?

Not in question. The 00s 2nd team QB destroys the 10s first team by himself. What a decade when Colt is 2nd team QB just Bc he didn’t win a title.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do like that underrated Longhorn pick of the decade, John Harris.  Guy spends three years catching as many passes as I did, and then saves Swoopes' (and by rule, Strong's) ass by stepping up outta nowhere in 2014 and having an out of his mind season (68 catches, 16ypc, 7 TD's).  He doesn't make second half of the season defenses honest, they double team Marcus Johnson or Jaxson, and we don't get shit done in the passing game (and we barely got shit done in the passing game).  That teams doesn't make a bowl game that year and strong maybe doesn't even get the 2016 chance to fuck up.  Meh, he probably does.

But anyway, here's to you John Harris.  A great Longhorn who put in his time for 3 years in the shadows, blew up, and helped keep the program moving through the rough years.  We ain't there yet, but he helped.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This entire team - meh. Worst decade ever. I like some of the individuals but no way would I be touting this as an accomplishment. I’m just thankful Sam gets to play in a new decade

Edited by Dr. Beeper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fact that Malcolm Brown, Jackson Jeffcoat and Malik Jefferson made this list tells the story on the decade. Lots of 5 star talent that did exactly dick, and despite their lack of production, they’re on the all-decade team. Because we suck. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Sgt Hulk said:

can I get men in black memory blanked of this decade?

spacer.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, A’Dam Psycho said:

Honest question: would the 2000s all decade 2nd team beat the breaks off our 2010s first team?

Without fucking question. 2000s 2nd team destroys this first team. It ain’t even close. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So off the top of my head our 2000s 2nd team would something like:

 

QB: Colt McCoy

RB: Chris Ogbonaya

      Selvin Young

OL: (some mixture of)

       David Snow

       Kasey Studdard

       Adam Ulatoski

       Derek Dockery

       Tony Hills

TE: Bo Scaife/Jermichael Finley

WR: Mike Davis

        Limas Sweed

 

DL: Tim Crowder/Larry Dibbles

       Frank Okam/Derek Lokey

       Rodrique Wright/Roy Miller

       Brian Robison      

LB: Scott Derry

      Aaron Harris

      Robert Killebrew

CB: Cedric Griffin

       Aaron Williams/Terrell Brown

S:   Michael Griffin

      Blake Gideon

K: Hunter Lawrence 

P: I have no fucking idea

 

This team would beat the fight out of 2010 first team

Edited by A’Dam Psycho

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Dr. Beeper said:

This entire team - meh. Worst decade ever. I like some of the individuals but no way would I be touting this as an accomplishment. I’m just thankful Sam gets to play in a new decade

I think the 1930's were probably as bad for Texas, although we did manage to win one conference title during that decade (in 1930).  49-44-2 (you take out the '30 championship team and it's really a shit-show of a decade).  It also matches Strong's run for the only other time in Longhorn history, we had 3-straight losing records ('35-'38, 4 actually).  We finish dead last, or tied for last 4 times in that decade.  Something even our 2010's teams couldn't compete with.  

But yeah, with our own television network, three coaches in this decade who were all among the Top 5-10 highest paid coaches in the nation, fresh off a massive stadium expansion (NEZ in 2008/09), Top 10 recruiting class after Top 10 recruiting class, a rebooted conference refilled with teams we should have easily dominated, and almost every other advantage laid out in front of us and we managed to do maybe the worst decade in the history of our program (I'll say tied with the 1930's).  

What the fuck does that say about Texas?   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, A’Dam Psycho said:

So off the top of my head our 2000s 2nd team would something like:

 

QB: Colt McCoy

RB: Chris Ogbonaya

      Selvin Young

OL: (some mixture of)

       David Snow

       Kasey Studdard

       Adam Ulatoski

       Derek Dockery

       Tony Hills

TE: Bo Scaife/Jermichael Finley

WR: Mike Davis

        Limas Sweed

 

DL: Tim Crowder/Larry Dibbles

       Frank Okam/Derek Lokey

       Rodrique Wright/Roy Miller

       Brian Robison      

LB: Scott Derry

      Aaron Harris

      Robert Killebrew

CB: Cedric Griffin

       Aaron Williams/Terrell Brown

S:   Michael Griffin

      Blake Gideon

K: Hunter Lawrence 

P: I have no fucking idea

 

This team would beat the fight out of 2010 first team

The only hope would be Dicko pulling a Texas Bowl vs. Mizzou and pinning them at the 1 every single possession.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...