Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • 3 weeks later...

I'm being brave and trying beef ribs (chuck ribs) for the first time for xmas dinner. 

I'm trying to plan how long they'll take, and see varying times from different sources. I'll be cooking on a UDS, which can tend to be a bit faster than an offset it seems. 

I think I'll probably cook at ~285 at the grate (maybe at 300 depending on the responses I get here). 

Planning to go bone down. Not planning to wrap them unless it looks necessary - if I do I'll wrap in butcher paper. 

Thoughts / tips from my UDS brethren? 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm being brave and trying beef ribs (chuck ribs) for the first time for xmas dinner. 
I'm trying to plan how long they'll take, and see varying times from different sources. I'll be cooking on a UDS, which can tend to be a bit faster than an offset it seems. 
I think I'll probably cook at ~285 at the grate (maybe at 300 depending on the responses I get here). 
Planning to go bone down. Not planning to wrap them unless it looks necessary - if I do I'll wrap in butcher paper. 
Thoughts / tips from my UDS brethren? 
 
Weight and/or number of bones would be helpful.
Link to post
Share on other sites

9 pounds total. 2 racks, 4 bones each. They came in a 2-pack from HEB very similar looking to what deft posted near the top of page 2. 

edit: a lot like the 2 pack you (Dr Fear) posted on the last page as well. One rack is bigger, thicker than the other. 

Edited by BillyBadAss
Link to post
Share on other sites

It's my favorite part of a standing rib roast, I usually skip the "steak" portion and just grab a couple of the ribs. Gnaw away, and then gift it to the nearest dog when done to become their best friend ever. If I'm cooking the roast, I score the membrane and meat on the underside between the ribs, and rub in some extra pepper because I like them that way.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I've only been able to find chuck short ribs (4 ribs per slab).  I've noticed a large vein of fat that runs diagonally across a couple of the ribs.  The fat is either trimmed or rendered during the cook - either way, you don't end up with four uniform ribs.  I have also noticed that the meat on the ribs is slightly different - almost like the difference between the flat and point of a brisket.  I'd like to find a couple slabs of plate ribs to see if they are more uniform across the slab in terms of distribution of fat and consistency of meat.

With that being said, Prime grade chuck ribs came out great on New Years.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Is there a big difference between chuck sort ribs and plate short ribs?  Both are uncut but not sure if one will be better for the smoker or if they will be about the same.


Yes, the uncut ones are referred to as gentile.

Jk. Plate ribs have more fat content and the meat fibers are not as dense.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, ChampKind said:

 


Yes, the uncut ones are referred to as gentile.

Jk. Plate ribs have more fat content and the meat fibers are not as dense.

 

Come on, Jim.  Give us a lesson on beef ribs.  My observations are from four slabs of chuck ribs - two slabs of select, two slabs of prime.  Obviously the prime had more marbling to begin with.  Are the plate ribs more uniform with texture and fat distribution?  

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Beantown Express 2.0 said:

So what does that mean for flavor and texture if the meat fibers are more dense on a chuck rib and less fat?

I think the point vs flat analogy was decent. Flavor is meatier with less fat, more decadent with fat. Same with texture.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Come on, Jim.  Give us a lesson on beef ribs.  My observations are from four slabs of chuck ribs - two slabs of select, two slabs of prime.  Obviously the prime had more marbling to begin with.  Are the plate ribs more uniform with texture and fat distribution?  


My opinion, which is worth roughly two pennies.

Chuck ribs are going be tighter and more like lean brisket with much less fat content. They’re also much less expensive than plates and have a higher yield.

I cook plates. Bc when done properly its like meat flavored butter on a bone. They are roughly twice the cost of chucks and yield about 30% less. Hence the $22/lb cost.
Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Jerry Callo said:

I'd eat the hell out of those, if offered, and they look damn tasty.  But no way I'm cooking beef ribs for 24 hours to make pot roast tacos.

that's because you lack imagination and don't know what else was on them...

but that's fine.

Edited by sidis
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...