Jump to content
Dutch

Chili w/o beans

Recommended Posts

Starting off with a copy of Snow Dog’s recipe. 

 

“I use the Cin-chili recipe.
With my own modifications which will not be divulged. 
http://www.chili.org/cindy.html
I'm off tomorrow, I believe I will make a pot o' chili.


Step 1
2 lbs - beef chuck tender cut into 3/8" cubes
1 tsp - cooking oil
1 tbsp - dark chili powder
2 tsp - granulated garlic

In a three quart heavy saucepan, add the above ingredients while browning the meat.

Step 2
1 - 8 oz can of tomato sauce
1 - 14-1/2 oz can of beef broth
1 tsp - chicken bouillon granules
1 tsp - jalapeno powder
1 tbsp - onion powder
2 tsp - garlic powder
1/2 tsp - red pepper
1 tsp - white pepper
16 oz - spring water
1 tbsp - dark chili powder
2 - serrano peppers
1/2 tsp - salt

Combine seasonings and add to beef mixture. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 1-1/2 hours. Float 2 serrano peppers.

Step 3
1 tbsp - paprika
1 pkg - Sazon seasoning (msg)
1 tsp - onion powder
1 tsp - garlic powder
1/2 tsp - white pepper
5 tbsp - medium and dark chili powders

Combine seasonings and add to beef mixture. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes. You may add water or beef broth for consistency. Remove serrano peppers when they become soft.

Step 4
2 tsp - $#@!in
1/8 tsp - salt

Add above ingredients and simmer for 10 minutes.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/25/2018 at 12:48 PM, jimmyjazz said:

Still don't need to spell out "w/o beans" . . .

That and chili w/o....yellow? Queso? Lime halves?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, WhatTheBuck said:

When do you add the brick of Velveeta?

After you make the roux.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/3/2018 at 6:46 PM, burntorangebongos said:

Where is snow dog with his contibution or is there another thread?

I don't know if Snow Dog make the move over here?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Horn_Spanker said:

I don't know if Snow Dog make the move over here?

The name does not pop up on the list if you @him. Unless he has changed his handle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a pot of red on the stove right now.  2.25 lb ground chuck, rehydrated peppers (3 ancho, 8 guajillo, approximately 1 oz each after stemming and seeding), a small onion, 2 cloves garlic, 8 oz tomato sauce (fucked up and meant to get paste, this stuff doesn't have shit like basil anyway so it might not matter), 3 cups beef broth, 1 T cumin, some paprika, Mexican oregano, salt.  Intentionally avoided hotter peppers like cayenne, arbol, chipotle to see how this might turn out.  I'll spike it up if need be, trying to baseline the heat level.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was clear that was gonna be too mild, so I added 1 tsp dried chipotle and 1/2 tsp cayenne.  That bumped the result to "mild" (but incredibly tasty).  Turns out I forgot to add the tomato sauce, so I ended up making a fairly legit original San Antonion chili without completely intending to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Which brings me to my next question:  if you look at the accepted original chili recipe recipe by the San Antonio Chili Queens, you'll see a reference to "dried red chiles":

Quote

2 lbs beef shoulder, cut into ½-inch cubes

1 lb pork shoulder, cut into ½-inch cubes

¼ cup suet

¼ cup pork fat

3 medium-sized onions, chopped

6 garlic cloves, minced

1-quart water

4 ancho chiles

1 serrano chile

6 dried red chiles

1 Tablespoon comino seeds, freshly ground

2 tablespoons Mexican oregano

Salt to taste

What would be a good guess as to the actual "red chile" used in San Antonio circa 1880?  New Mexico chiles?  Guajillos?  Robb Walsh says "ancho + others" to round out the flavor.  I'm just fascinated with the idea of going back to something close to the original recipe (which no doubt varied from vendor to vendor anyway) and using ingredients of the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably my best ever:  an attempt to get close to the original San Antonio Chili Queens recipe.  I used less onion and more chile peppers & cumin, but the result was stellar.  I'd say the heat was "medium".  No tomatoes, no stock, mostly just beef & pork, chile peppers, spices and water.

Chili_Queen_Chili.jpg

 

2 lb    beef chuck (cubed ~ 1/2")
1 lb    pork loin (cubed ~ 1/2")
8        dried guajillo peppers
8        dried ancho peppers
4        dried chipotle peppers
3        cloves garlic 
1        medium sweet onion 
1 t     Mexican oregano
2 T    cumin seeds
2 t     paprika
1 T    salt 
8 c    water
3 T    extra virgin olive oil
3 T    masa harina

1.       stem & seed ancho, guajillo and chipotle peppers.  Soak in 4c hot water for 20 minutes.  Discard steeping water.

2.       Toast cumin seeds until fragrant; grind to medium powder

3.       Combine cumin with oregano, paprika and salt

4.       Heat 4 c water until warm and add to blender with drained peppers and half of spice blend

5.       Blend pepper/water/spice combination with 1 T olive oil until very smooth

6.       Dice onion medium fine; saute in 2 T olive oil until slightly translucent over medium heat in large Dutch oven

7.       Mince garlic and set aside

8.       Dice beef & pork to ~ ½” cubes, add to Dutch oven, season with remaining spice blend and saute until lightly browned

9.       Add garlic to Dutch oven for ~ 30 seconds, do not burn

10.    Immediately add pepper/water/spice puree to Dutch oven and reduce to low

11.    Simmer for 2-3 hours, adding water as necessary.  Add masa harina before serving to tighten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Judge Roybeanbag said:

That looks fucking fantastic. 

Thanks, it was.  Believe me, I've made a lot of shitty chili in my life.  Using rehydrated peppers probably makes the biggest difference, followed by toasting and grinding cumin seeds.  I think cumin powder loses its oils and flavor over time.

While I don't like screaming hot food, I'd like this to be just a bit hotter.  I will probably add another chipotle pepper and then float a serrano next time.  I would say this was probably just shy of Texas Chili Parlor XX.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish I knew.  I have a lot to learn.  I've seen references to "mouth feel" for different chilis, but I'm not far enough along to discern those things.

Judge, I've been making chili for so long it doesn't surprise me that I've gone back and forth on preferences.  All I know is that I'm not there yet, but my family agreed (and they will tell me otherwise, believe me) that this was about as good as I've done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, jimmyjazz said:

Probably my best ever:  an attempt to get close to the original San Antonio Chili Queens recipe.  I used less onion and more chile peppers & cumin, but the result was stellar.  I'd say the heat was "medium".  No tomatoes, no stock, mostly just beef & pork, chile peppers, spices and water.

Chili_Queen_Chili.jpg

 

2 lb    beef chuck (cubed ~ 1/2")
1 lb    pork loin (cubed ~ 1/2")
8        dried guajillo peppers
8        dried ancho peppers
4        dried chipotle peppers
3        cloves garlic 
1        medium sweet onion 
1 t     Mexican oregano
2 T    cumin seeds
2 t     paprika
1 T    salt 
8 c    water
3 T    extra virgin olive oil
3 T    masa harina

1.       stem & seed ancho, guajillo and chipotle peppers.  Soak in 4c hot water for 20 minutes.  Discard steeping water.

2.       Toast cumin seeds until fragrant; grind to medium powder

3.       Combine cumin with oregano, paprika and salt

4.       Heat 4 c water until warm and add to blender with drained peppers and half of spice blend

5.       Blend pepper/water/spice combination with 1 T olive oil until very smooth

6.       Dice onion medium fine; saute in 2 T olive oil until slightly translucent over medium heat in large Dutch oven

7.       Mince garlic and set aside

8.       Dice beef & pork to ~ ½” cubes, add to Dutch oven, season with remaining spice blend and saute until lightly browned

9.       Add garlic to Dutch oven for ~ 30 seconds, do not burn

10.    Immediately add pepper/water/spice puree to Dutch oven and reduce to low

11.    Simmer for 2-3 hours, adding water as necessary.  Add masa harina before serving to tighten.

This guy fucks.

About 6 years ago I learned to make chili with reconstituted chili peppers and I've never made it any other way since.  I do a variation of this recipe, but have never used paprika. Might give that a try. 

jimmyjazz, might I suggest a teaspoon of instant espresso.  Gives it a nice extra dark kick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, South Austin said:

About 6 years ago I learned to make chili with reconstituted chili peppers and I've never made it any other way since.  I do a variation of this recipe, but have never used paprika. Might give that a try. 

Thanks for pointing that out.  I have no idea how that got in there.  Not that I didn't use paprika, I did, but yeah it's pretty unlikely it was part of SA chili in the late 1800's.

Plus, I see I didn't use enough oregano.

Onward.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First brisket chili of the season.

Brisket:

31088533478_f9242bf5b6_z.jpg

Other ingredients:

44912943022_6ff525505f_z.jpg

Not pictured: home roasted hot Hatch green chilies, frozen then thawed, chopped.

44241826554_f7f6b4ce41_z.jpg

I LOVE Fall.  Let’s get to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That brisket looks really good. I made chili with brisket once and was underwhelmed but maybe my brisket sucked. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks.  Smoked over hickory, low and slow.  Gives the chili a very nice smoky flavor.  I’ve seen people make brisket chili where they cook cubes of raw brisket in the chili, but I prefer smoked brisket in mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, I'll second JJ and Sola: leftover smoked brisket makes an amazing pot of chili.  A leftover beef rib makes a fine chili addition as well.

Good looking pot, Sola.  I notice bottle of tequila amongst the ingredients.  Might I inquire as to its usage?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dutch, I put ~3 oz tequila in each pot.  I use the Negra Modelo to dilute the tomato paste.  Not pictured: the other 5 bottles of NM I drank while making and simmering the chili.

Edited by solamente73
5 bottles of beer, not tequila. I'm not 24 anymore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/24/2018 at 12:20 PM, jimmyjazz said:

Probably my best ever:  an attempt to get close to the original San Antonio Chili Queens recipe.  I used less onion and more chile peppers & cumin, but the result was stellar.  I'd say the heat was "medium".  No tomatoes, no stock, mostly just beef & pork, chile peppers, spices and water.

Chili_Queen_Chili.jpg

 

2 lb    beef chuck (cubed ~ 1/2")
1 lb    pork loin (cubed ~ 1/2")
8        dried guajillo peppers
8        dried ancho peppers
4        dried chipotle peppers
3        cloves garlic 
1        medium sweet onion 
1 t     Mexican oregano
2 T    cumin seeds
2 t     paprika
1 T    salt 
8 c    water
3 T    extra virgin olive oil
3 T    masa harina

1.       stem & seed ancho, guajillo and chipotle peppers.  Soak in 4c hot water for 20 minutes.  Discard steeping water.

2.       Toast cumin seeds until fragrant; grind to medium powder

3.       Combine cumin with oregano, paprika and salt

4.       Heat 4 c water until warm and add to blender with drained peppers and half of spice blend

5.       Blend pepper/water/spice combination with 1 T olive oil until very smooth

6.       Dice onion medium fine; saute in 2 T olive oil until slightly translucent over medium heat in large Dutch oven

7.       Mince garlic and set aside

8.       Dice beef & pork to ~ ½” cubes, add to Dutch oven, season with remaining spice blend and saute until lightly browned

9.       Add garlic to Dutch oven for ~ 30 seconds, do not burn

10.    Immediately add pepper/water/spice puree to Dutch oven and reduce to low

11.    Simmer for 2-3 hours, adding water as necessary.  Add masa harina before serving to tighten.

Made this tonight...doubled the Mexican oregano and used a beer in place of additional water, but god damn this was the truth.  Agree it could be a little spicier but I just watched two 11 year olds and a picky as shit 15 year old take down whole bowls and in this case of my son go back and get more.  That rarely happens as the wife and I love chili but it ain't their thing.  If I'm cooking it without kids in play I'll float a couple of serannos.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, ERhine said:

Gumbo?

 

Also an acceptable response to a cold front.

Your mom tongued my gumbo last night[/alternate surly response]

7078172-B-688-C-4297-8-C55-DC266-AC20210 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks, it was.  Believe me, I've made a lot of shitty chili in my life.  Using rehydrated peppers probably makes the biggest difference, followed by toasting and grinding cumin seeds.  I think cumin powder loses its oils and flavor over time.
While I don't like screaming hot food, I'd like this to be just a bit hotter.  I will probably add another chipotle pepper and then float a serrano next time.  I would say this was probably just shy of Texas Chili Parlor XX.

This guy fucks.
About 6 years ago I learned to make chili with reconstituted chili peppers and I've never made it any other way since.  I do a variation of this recipe, but have never used paprika. Might give that a try. 
jimmyjazz, might I suggest a teaspoon of instant espresso.  Gives it a nice extra dark kick.

Man, the reconstituted chilis (I like guajilo) is the way to go. And yes on toasting the cumin seeds then grinding.

No pics, but I’m finishing off last year’s venison, made a big batch yesterday for tonight. Mix of chili grind and a fine dice of chunks. Mix of all the typical seasonings. Had a bite, but not so much my gringa wife didn’t eat a big bowl.

I’m really getting this chili thing down. I don’t even measure stuff. Just add things till it tastes right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like guajillo too, but I mix with ancho to get a little more complexity.  Plus, the color is too red when it's all guajillo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I like guajillo too, but I mix with ancho to get a little more complexity.  Plus, the color is too red when it's all guajillo.

I’m willing to roll that way to try it. I get some smokiness because I brown my venison in bacon grease.

Because you know how awesome bacon grease is? It’s all of the awesome. It makes everything better. Hell, I might start keeping a jar in the bedroom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't mind the color, it's called Texas Red after all.  But I mix multiple reconstituted peppers to develop more depth of flavor.  I like guajillo, ancho, New Mexican red,  and chile de arbol.

And I always brown the cubed beef in either bacon grease, or chorizo grease.  Or like today, where I used both.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm here for the gangbang.

2018-10-16-Chili1.jpg

Toast the peppers, soak in water, then puree:

2018-10-16-Chili2.jpg

Cut the roast into steaks and sear the bejesus out of them:

2018-10-16-Chili3.jpg

Sauté the onions, then add garlic, cumin and oregano:

2018-10-16-Chili4.jpg

Cube the beef before going back in the pot. This is before adding the puree and some water:

2018-10-16-Chili5.jpg

While drinking aggressively, simmer, taste and adjust until it is to your liking:

2018-10-16-Chili6.jpg

I did not make cornbread, but was feeling too fancy to just crumble saltines:

2018-10-16-Chili7.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/15/2018 at 7:04 PM, Anastasis said:

3-E97-E9-E9-2-BD3-4-F7-E-A3-DA-1-B14-C05

 

34 minutes ago, Gen. Applewhite said:

I'm here for the gangbang.

 

2018-10-16-Chili7.jpg

and people give me shit for not filling giant bowls

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/15/2018 at 10:26 PM, Brisketexan said:

 


Man, the reconstituted chilis (I like guajilo) is the way to go. And yes on toasting the cumin seeds then grinding.

No pics, but I’m finishing off last year’s venison, made a big batch yesterday for tonight. Mix of chili grind and a fine dice of chunks. Mix of all the typical seasonings. Had a bite, but not so much my gringa wife didn’t eat a big bowl.

I’m really getting this chili thing down. I don’t even measure stuff. Just add things till it tastes right.

 

Pretty much where I'm at now.

 

Get 2.5ish lbs of good meat, one large onion and that's about all the measuring I do.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Anastasis said:

lol, that bowl would hold most of the contents of my dutch oven if I filled it up. What can I say, I got big bowls. 

are they always bouncing to the left and to the right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You fine gentlemen using reconstituted peppers... how much puree are y'all using?  Measure by the cup?  Go by the number of peppers to pounds of meat?  Switching to homemade powder was a gamechanger for me, and from what I'm reading reconstituted peppers are another gamechanger;  wanting to give it a go for my next pot.

Thanks, and I'll hang up and listen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You fine gentlemen using reconstituted peppers... how much puree are y'all using?  Measure by the cup?  Go by the number of peppers to pounds of meat?  Switching to homemade powder was a gamechanger for me, and from what I'm reading reconstituted peppers are another gamechanger;  wanting to give it a go for my next pot.
Thanks, and I'll hang up and listen.

About 6 guajillos per lb of meat, and I also cheat and use some dried chili powder.

I just purée the peppers in enough of their cooking liquid to make them a good slurry. Really doesn’t matter, it cooks down as much as I want it to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^^^^

 

Yup.  I'll use 5-6 peppers per lb of meat.  And then I blend them up with maybe a cup or two of their steeping liquid, whatever works to get it to the consistency I like.  I used to strain that through a tea strainer to remove any last bits of skin, but the Vitamix liquefies it to the point that there's no pulp left.  Which is fine, it all just cooks down to my final consistency and if I need to add more liquid later, I'll either use a little stock, a little beer, or just use the remaining steeping liquid.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...