Jump to content

Movie theaters officially dead


Recommended Posts

57 minutes ago, utee94 said:

I like the experience, it's fun, and I don't find the food to be shitty, there are at least a couple dishes that I like.  

And I'm not overly worried about the price.

You can certainly choose not to do that, though.  Choice is a great thing in our society.

 

My other problem is the several times I have been to Alamo I get some guy right behind me with a large order of nachos and I have to listen to the fucking crunching for the first half of the movie.

I would rather they let people talk on their cell phone than serve them nachos.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Steamboat1874 said:

My other problem is the several times I have been to Alamo I get some guy right behind me with a large order of nachos and I have to listen to the fucking crunching for the first half of the movie.

I would rather they let people talk on their cell phone than serve them nachos.

That's fair.  I've never had that happen to me, but popcorn is certainly annoying, especially when served in a paper bag.  Thankfully Alamo uses bowls instead.

Again, choice is available and is a good thing.  if you prefer the sound of cell phone talking over food-eating, then it sounds like Cinemark should be your go-to.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/30/2020 at 10:10 AM, utee94 said:

That's fair.  I've never had that happen to me, but popcorn is certainly annoying, especially when served in a paper bag.  Thankfully Alamo uses bowls instead.

Again, choice is available and is a good thing.  if you prefer the sound of cell phone talking over food-eating, then it sounds like Cinemark should be your go-to.  

On the rare occasions we went out to Cinemark theaters, we went on geezer discount Tuesdays.  Maybe a dozen of us oldfarts spread out in the screening room, and those eating anything were were just gumming it. 

Edited by Armybrat
  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting twist

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2020/08/why-movie-theaters-are-in-trouble-after-doj-nixes-70-year-old-case/

Quote

But now, the rule that prevented a studio from buying up a major theater chain is gone—opening up the possibility that your local cinema could go whole hog and become a true Disneyplex before you know it.

On Friday, a federal judge agreed to the Department of Justice's petition to vacate the Paramount Consent Decrees, a landmark 1948 ruling that forbade vertical integration in the film sector and ended the Hollywood studio system. In isolation, the decision could raise some concerns. In a world where theaters are decimated thanks to a pandemic and consolidation among media firms is already rampant, the future for independent theaters looks grim.

Quote

The Paramount case is about vertical integration—at its most basic, the term for when a business owns multiple links up and down the supply chain.

By the late 1930s, the majority of power in Hollywood was concentrated in the hands of eight film studios, with the so-called Big Five—Paramount, MGM, Warner Brothers, 20th Century Fox, and RKO—holding the lion's share of the market. The studios not only locked actors into contracts and controlled film production and the distribution of those films, but also they bought up and founded movie theaters all over the country and thus controlled exhibition as well.

The DOJ filed suit in 1938 alleging the eight studios were violating antitrust law in two key ways. First, the DOJ said, the studios were part of an unlawful price-fixing conspiracy, and second, they were monopolizing the distribution and exhibition sectors.

Quote

In April 2018, the Justice Department announced it would undertake a review of "legacy" consent decrees put in place during the late 19th and 20th centuries as part of an agency-wide modernization initiative.

Long article, interesting read.  I'm not sure that a company like Disney would want that though, when they could just shuffle their movies straight to TV and reap almost 100% of the revenue (streaming infrastructure is cheap once it's up and running, versus having to pay property taxes on theaters, utility bills, wages of the employees, etc.).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for link.  
 

good point, the triple nets on theaters are especially brutal and eventually find their way back through the money chain to the distributors and eventually the production companies.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/4/2020 at 3:49 PM, mdmost said:

So theaters are dead for this year at least it seems. Disney+ will have the live action Mulan as a $30 add on. 

 

 

Can I pay $30 each to watch "Tenet" and "No Time To Die" now?

I enjoy the theater experience, but am happy to pay more to watch at home if I don't have to wait another year.  

Edited by Tom
Link to post
Share on other sites

Meanwhile, Alamo will let you rent a theater for $150, for up to 30 people (although they have to buy tickets or you do , or whatever, in addition to the $150).  You have to pick from around 40 or so movies.

https://drafthouse.com/personal-theater

Weird Science, the original Muppet Movie, Jurassic Park, and a bunch of others covering a wide range.

I would absolutely consider renting it next year for my son's 9th birthday.  Jurassic Park would be awesome.

 

Edited by atomheartbevo
Link to post
Share on other sites
Meanwhile, Alamo will let you rent a theater for $150, for up to 30 people (although they have to buy tickets or you do , or whatever, in addition to the $150).  You have to pick from around 40 or so movies.

https://drafthouse.com/personal-theater

Weird Science, the original Muppet Movie, Jurassic Park, and a bunch of others covering a wide range.

I would absolutely consider renting it next year for my son's 9th birthday.  Jurassic Park would be awesome.

 

It’s $150 for the theater plus tickets for each person and a $150 minimum food/drink purchase. Still not a bad deal.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, atomheartbevo said:

Meanwhile, Alamo will let you rent a theater for $150, for up to 30 people (although they have to buy tickets or you do , or whatever, in addition to the $150).  You have to pick from around 40 or so movies.

https://drafthouse.com/personal-theater

Weird Science, the original Muppet Movie, Jurassic Park, and a bunch of others covering a wide range.

I would absolutely consider renting it next year for my son's 9th birthday.  Jurassic Park would be awesome.

 

I wish they'd do this for new movies.  I saw Jurassic Park in theater in 5th grade and again a few years ago when it came out again on some 20-or-so year anniversary in 3D.  I don't care to see it again.  Again, give me "Tenet" or "No Time To Die" and we're talking.

Link to post
Share on other sites

At AMC, we know you’re concerned about touching public spaces these days.  That’s why, for the rest of the year...we are going to institute a promotion that literally ensures every employee and moviegoer alike will have to hand each other lots and lots of germ infested coins.   Because, 1920: a year the Spanish Flu was still raging.  

Edited by Lobo
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Pato del Muerto said:

Saw a trailer for new mutants, saying in theaters 8/28 or whatever date. Is this the first movie to be released?  And it’s a Disney marvel movie?

Disney has contract obligations with the studios to fill.  Sooner they get it in theaters for a few weeks, sooner it hits Disney+

Link to post
Share on other sites
Saw a trailer for new mutants, saying in theaters 8/28 or whatever date. Is this the first movie to be released?  And it’s a Disney marvel movie?

I think it was shelved by whoever owned the XMen prior to Disney getting the rights recently and Disney decided to go ahead and release it.
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/11/2020 at 10:20 PM, atomheartbevo said:

Meanwhile, Alamo will let you rent a theater for $150, for up to 30 people (although they have to buy tickets or you do , or whatever, in addition to the $150).  You have to pick from around 40 or so movies.

https://drafthouse.com/personal-theater

Weird Science, the original Muppet Movie, Jurassic Park, and a bunch of others covering a wide range.

I would absolutely consider renting it next year for my son's 9th birthday.  Jurassic Park would be awesome.

 

Saw Free Willy for my 8th birthday party. Nobody else in the theater, and we didn't even pay anything more than regular ticket prices. Of course it was in October, and the movie came out in July and we didn't get any booze. But still pretty cool at the time.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
It’s $150 for the theater plus tickets for each person and a $150 minimum food/drink purchase. Still not a bad deal.

Eh. We typically go rent some place for our kids parties and that includes admission for guests. 30 people at $10 per and now you’re at $450 with no food. I’d think $300 including guests up to 30 would be a good price point.
  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

According to a new report from IndieWire, Tenet’s opening weekend in North America has resulted in a stunningly meager $10 million take. This contradicts initial reports from Warner Bros. who had stated that the film brought in $20 million over the weekend. However, because Warner did not break the total down by days, that total actually included a Thursday opening, three days of sneak previews and nine days in Canada, as well as the Labor Day holiday in both the United States and Canada. While those initial estimates weren’t clear about this, neither a $10 million nor a $20 million opening weekend is on par for a film of Tenet’s expected calibre.

 

https://screenrant.com/tenet-10-million-box-office-opening-weekend/

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ouch. Are we going to kill any production companies that have hundreds of millions in production costs that they either don’t get back with release or have to sit on indefinitely?  What is the financial position of such companies?

disney should be fine, though I’d love to see their overall 2020 finances to see how big a hit they are absorbing from all their revenue streams. 
are the other big guys like universal and warner ok?

what about smaller companies?

Edited by Pato del Muerto
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/14/2020 at 6:38 AM, NotActuallyALonghorn said:

Saw Free Willy for my 8th birthday party. Nobody else in the theater, and we didn't even pay anything more than regular ticket prices. Of course it was in October, and the movie came out in July and we didn't get any booze. But still pretty cool at the time.

So for your 8th birthday somebody freed their willy for you

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If Alamo would’ve allowed Tenet to be screened as part of their rent-a-screen deal, our bubble would’ve done so. Really think they’re missing an opportunity not allowing new releases to be screened like this.

 

 

It’ll be interesting to compare how Mulan did.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Pato del Muerto said:

Ouch. Are we going to kill any production companies that have hundreds of millions in production costs that they either don’t get back with release or have to sit on indefinitely?  What is the financial position of such companies?

disney should be fine, though I’d love to see their overall 2020 finances to see how big a hit they are absorbing from all their revenue streams. 
are the other big guys like universal and warner ok?

what about smaller companies?

I wonder when we're going to start seeing very little content since there's been 6 months of downtime with production. Reminds me of the writer's strike when the content was really subpar. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, mdmost said:

I wonder when we're going to start seeing very little content since there's been 6 months of downtime with production. Reminds me of the writer's strike when the content was really subpar. 

Writers strike is what birthed “reality tv” like big brother, the apprentice, amazing race, and survivor. 
So a pox on all of their houses, both sides, for their actions there. 
maybe the answer for theaters is documentary films?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pato del Muerto said:

Writers strike is what birthed “reality tv” like big brother, the apprentice, amazing race, and survivor. 
So a pox on all of their houses, both sides, for their actions there. 
maybe the answer for theaters is documentary films?

lol, what?   Every single example you just gave was of a show which was on LONG before the writer’s strike.  Like, several years before.  

The writers strike is what brought us Landry and Tyra murdering someone with their car on Friday Night Lights.  

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Chet Steadman said:

lol, what?   Every single example you just gave was of a show which was on LONG before the writer’s strike.  Like, several years before.  

The writers strike is what brought us Landry and Tyra murdering someone with their car on Friday Night Lights.  

Can’t remember the exact details and it may have been internet bullshit,  but allegedly the strike kept Jesse from getting killed off in season 1 of Breaking Bad. No way it’s as good a series without him, bitch....

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Chet Steadman said:

lol, what?   Every single example you just gave was of a show which was on LONG before the writer’s strike.  Like, several years before.  

The writers strike is what brought us Landry and Tyra murdering someone with their car on Friday Night Lights.  

Sorry I got confused. 2000 was the actors strike. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Wanker Bob said:

Nobody but dipshits want to be sitting in a theater with strangers right now. Just release these movies for home streaming at $25 a pop or something. I do miss me some theater popcorn though. Might run by the AMC and buy some to take home for a movie

Our local target has popcorn at their food bar thing that is pretty much just like movie theater popcorn. Something like two or three bucks for a large family sized bag. Only real catch is no butter, but I'm sure you can find a solution for that.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, CooterBrown said:

If Alamo would’ve allowed Tenet to be screened as part of their rent-a-screen deal, our bubble would’ve done so. Really think they’re missing an opportunity not allowing new releases to be screened like this.

 

 

It’ll be interesting to compare how Mulan did.

Isn't Tenet scheduled to be home premium rental released in 2 weeks? Maybe Alamo can do it then.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My math sucks, too.  It would be around $20 a head.

Not too bad, especially to have the theater just for your group.

 

i don't consider a popcorn and a coke as "dinner" though, but I still concede the point.

Edited by slorch
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, NotActuallyALonghorn said:

Our local target has popcorn at their food bar thing that is pretty much just like movie theater popcorn. Something like two or three bucks for a large family sized bag. Only real catch is no butter, but I'm sure you can find a solution for that.

It's not as good as the movie theater but all the targets around me shut that down for the pandemic anyway

Link to post
Share on other sites

You may or may not have this nor wish to go there but we found out by accident that the bagged popcorn at Dollar Tree is about as close to theater popcorn as there is. Toss it in the microwave for 20-30 seconds and it's very close to theater quality. 

https://www.dollartree.com/brims-butter-flavored-popcorn-8oz-bags/138197

Edited by mdmost
Link to post
Share on other sites

If things were already looking bleak for American cinemas, the immediate future now looks catastrophic. This past weekend, the total domestic box office was less than $15 million—Indiewire estimates that sum amounts to $5,000 per theater, which isn’t enough to pay for basic operating costs.

 

 

https://www.indiewire.com/2020/09/tenet-6-7-million-total-box-office-is-under-15-million-theaters-hurt-1234586104/

Link to post
Share on other sites

So of the average full-priced ticket on a first-run movie in the first month of screening, the studio gets apparently about 60% according to the old model?  And who gets most of the rest of that ticket price?  The Theaters?  Nope.  Not even fucking close.  It's the owners of their real estate and their NNN expenses.  10,000 square feet, 300 impervious parking spaces, plus lobby and hallways.  All based on a less than 5% margin.  Fuck 'em.  Let 'em rot.  They overbuilt and my kids gotta deal with these fucking eyesores for a whole generation.  How many of these things can we turn into Gymborees or homeless shelters?  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Ă—
Ă—
  • Create New...