Jump to content
G650

Hastag Menswear - Win Instagram or Die Trying

Recommended Posts

30 minutes ago, TwiceHorn said:

Can't handle the knit ties.  Too late 70s, early 80s for me.

Or 60s, or 90s, or 2000s....

I have one black Turnbull knit. Don't wear it often, but pair it with a navy suit and black shoes for the 1964 CIA officer look. Or funerals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, G650 said:

Or 60s, or 90s, or 2000s....

I have one black Turnbull knit. Don't wear it often, but pair it with a navy suit and black shoes for the 1964 CIA officer look. Or funerals.

I mean associated with the fashion abominations of those eras.  I know they are semi classic in a slovenly European way, just can't deal.

Edited by TwiceHorn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can get grenadine ties that has similarly nice open-weave like the knits, but is finished traditionally so it doesn't have attention grabbing stubby end. 
 

For winter I like wool ties.  I'm a sucker for the texture.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, 52-80 said:

 

For winter I like wool ties.  I'm a sucker for the texture.

 

I've been on a raw silk kick lately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

The demise of formal nights on cruises: How dress codes are tearing passengers apart

 
 
WQFLZO57UZASJJM66FS5Y3IELE.jpg
Formal night on a Cunard Cruise in the 1940s. (Cunard Cruise Lines)
 
December 17 at 2:19 PM
 
Add to list

Gerry Eggert has taken a lot of cruises in his 78 years. But the Chilliwack, B.C., resident has noticed something recently: People aren’t dressing up like they used to.

He took his concerns to Facebook and quizzed a group of fellow Holland America Line fans: “This should draw some controversy!” he began. “My wife and I … don’t particularly like the ‘relaxed’ dress code HAL now allows in their main dining rooms, especially on ‘gala’ formal evenings.” He asked how fellow cruisers in the group felt.

The query struck a nerve and sparked more than a few squabbles, differences of opinion and downright insults.

NB5W7EBACUI6VMBU3Z64FNIZTM.jpg
Gerry and Diane Eggert at formal night on a cruise. (From the Eggerts)

“Only undertakers wear suits in today’s business environment!” wrote one retiree who doesn’t care to dress up on vacation.

“If you want to dress like a construction worker eat outside with the construction workers!” one woman wrote.

“Dress like you are going somewhere nice, not McDonald’s or Burger King,” someone else suggested.

But the conversation revealed a deeper truth: Formal nights, a holdover from a grand cruising tradition, are becoming less formal — when they exist at all. And while that might be welcome news for travelers who just want to relax on vacation, it’s a sad turn for many who love to dine with a dressed-up crowd.

[Recent incident over attire highlights the ambiguity in airline dress codes]

“There has been a bit of an evolution in the dress code overall,” says Colleen McDaniel, executive editor of the news and review site Cruise Critic. “It doesn’t mean that everybody loves that. And in fact, many people who visit our message boards who are very much in favor of a formal night — and a formal dress policy — really, really don’t like it when people show up who are not in formalwear.”

JPCIV5RAC4I6VMBU3Z64FNIZTM.jpg
Aboard the Saturnia transatlantic liner in the 1920s. (Marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

Cruise lines typically have a night or two during a sailing where passengers are encouraged to dress up for dinner in certain restaurants and get professional photos taken. The suggested attire varies, but typically, it includes at least a dress, pantsuit or skirt and blouse for women, and dress pants and a collared shirt for men.

Many lines that still host some kind of dressier-than-usual night have eased requirements or made their dress code a mere recommendation. And as the number of dining options on ships has expanded, so have nonformal venues beyond the main dining rooms.

Celebrity Cruises, which describes itself as a “modern luxury” option, changed formal night to “evening chic” in 2015, allowing designer jeans and making a sport coat or blazer option for men. Holland America Line introduced “gala nights” in 2015; while a jacket and tie there is preferred, it is not required. Carnival Cruise Line changed its formal night to “cruise elegant” several years ago, adopting “more of a resort-style dress guideline.” Norwegian Cruise Line has a “dress up or not night.” And Royal Caribbean International recently started holding a “wear your best” night on cruises of five nights or fewer, with the message: “Say goodbye to Formal Night, and hello to Wear Your Best. Get glamorous. Be chic. It’s time to shine — your way.”

For some travelers, the loosened rules signal a disappointing end to a beloved way of life — not just in cruising, but also in society in general. They point out that travelers don’t dress up as much to take a flight, or go out to dinner, or attend a wedding or religious service.

“The change in dress is a reflection of the change in times,” said one user on the Cruise Critic message boards in November.

Many of the companies that have relaxed their policies say they’re responding to preferences of modern passengers, who may prefer a more casual vibe on board, not wanting to load down their luggage with suits or evening gowns. More people are cruising, an estimated 30 million this year, and that growth is coming from travelers who aren’t necessarily looking for fancy experiences, insiders say.

Other lines, many of them newer, eschew the idea of a dedicated formal night altogether, opting for “country club casual” (Oceania), “elegant casual” (Viking Ocean) or merely “more than a bathing suit” (the new Virgin Voyages). Virgin, which launches its first ship next year, has made a point of rethinking almost every element of a cruise — “which includes pesky dress codes,” chief commercial officer Nirmal Saverimuttu said in an email. “If our Sailors want to get fancy and dress up, they’re welcome to, but if they want to keep it cool and casual, we say go for it.”

At least one operator isn’t budging from tradition. Cunard, a line famous for its transatlantic crossings and old-school glamour, holds two or three “gala evenings” every seven days of a sailing where guests are encouraged to “be at your most glamorous when the clock strikes 6 p.m.” That means something like a flowing ball gown for women and a tux, suit or kilt with jacket for men. Bow ties, regular ties or cravats are all acceptable. But even Cunard has nonformal settings where dressed-down can go, including the buffet, casino and pub.

MP4WGXBACMI6VMBU3Z64FNIZTM.jpg
Formal night on a Cunard Cruise in the 1940s. (Cunard Cruise Lines)

[They equated cruises with excess, so these first-timers set sail with a focus on wellness]

The wildly varying terms and enforcement policies can lead to some trepidation on the part of new cruisers and head-scratching even for those who’ve been around the ocean a few times.

“A lot of the cruise lines, their terminology has been so nebulous,” says Liam Cusack, managing editor of Cruise & Travel Report and administrator of the Facebook group Holland America Line Fans. “Resort chic — what exactly is that? Or ‘country club casual’ — people don’t know what that is.”

Cruise lines include information about what to wear in their frequently asked questions materials, and many online experts offer tips and explainers to decipher the codes.

John Heald, Carnival Cruise Line’s brand ambassador and a senior cruise director, said he frequently fields dress code questions on his popular Facebook page.

“There are still a few people who are afraid of what other people will think,” Heald says. “And a few who are concerned about what other people are wearing."

In July, he joked that he was going through withdrawal symptoms because he had not been posed a single question on the topic so far that day. That post prompted more than 400 comments, some sharp words and at least one response from a woman that included a reposting of Carnival’s official “elegant”-night dress code.

I can care less what you have on, you could at least just follow the rules why is this so hard."

Facebook commenter, lamenting the lack of observance of Carnival's dress codes

“Some of you need to read it since some of you think that jeans and flip flops are appropriate in the main dining room on ‘elegant’ night,” the commenter wrote. “I can care less what you have on, you could at least just follow the rules why is this so hard.”

Heald says his advice is always: “If you’re comfortable, you should not worry about what other people think, because 99 percent will look at you and say, ‘I hope you’re having a great time.'”

NBHYPTBACUI6VMBU3Z64FNIZTM.jpg
Emma Le Teace on Cunard's Queen Victoria cruise. (From Emma Le Teace)

The subject can be especially intimidating for those who haven’t cruised before. Emma Le Teace, 25, who runs the website Cruising Isn’t Just for Old People, said her most popular articles tend to revolve around dress codes.

“I think a lot of people are really afraid of the dress code, and they really shouldn’t be,” she says.

Le Teace said some of her fellow millennial cruisers actually enjoy the chance to dress up — as long as it’s not mandatory.

“Some people wear their prom dress again; when are you going to get the chance to do that?” she says. “Some people really love it. I think it’s about choice.”

Cusack says he, too, has seen younger cruisers embracing the opportunity to dress up.

“Especially among people that are hardcore fans of the movie ‘Titanic,’ they want that whole experience,” he says. (Well, most of the experience.) But for some, navigating the nuances is still a challenge.

When Kate and Josh Fox-Fuller took their first cruise this summer, a Mediterranean voyage for their honeymoon, they discovered the Royal Caribbean ship would have two formal nights rather than the one they prepared for. On the first night, Kate Fox-Fuller said they kept getting notifications to dress up. So she put on her “cocktail-slash-sundress” and her husband donned his “business casual” outfit and they headed to the buffet, where they had eaten all their meals. There, surrounded by casually dressed families, they realized the dress code was only for the more formal dining room.

Despite her effort, when Fox-Fuller was in the restroom, she said an older woman wearing a mother-of-the-bride-type gown commented on her outfit.

“She was like, ‘Did you know it was formal night?’” Fox-Fuller said. “I was like, ‘I’m wearing a sundress, it’s fine.’ It was very intense."

On the second formal night, she said, the couple took a different approach: “We just didn’t leave our room.”

 

Humans are a bunch of hobos part 87.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, G650 said:

When Kate and Josh Fox-Fuller took their first cruise this summer, a Mediterranean voyage for their honeymoon, they discovered the Royal Caribbean ship would have two formal nights rather than the one they prepared for. On the first night, Kate Fox-Fuller said they kept getting notifications to dress up. So she put on her “cocktail-slash-sundress” and her husband donned his “business casual” outfit and they headed to the buffet, where they had eaten all their meals. There, surrounded by casually dressed families, they realized the dress code was only for the more formal dining room.

Despite her effort, when Fox-Fuller was in the restroom, she said an older woman wearing a mother-of-the-bride-type gown commented on her outfit.

“She was like, ‘Did you know it was formal night?’” Fox-Fuller said. “I was like, ‘I’m wearing a sundress, it’s fine.’ It was very intense."

On the second formal night, she said, the couple took a different approach: “We just didn’t leave our room.”

what?  so they went to the buffet (not part of formal night) dressed casually, someone in a restroom later asked if they knew it was formal night, and then they skipped the other formal night, which they had prepared for?  or did they think a sundress and business casual constituted formal?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, 52-80 said:

I recently moved into a tech office.  Closed-toe shoes are considered formal dress there. 

Thoughts and prayers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, G650 said:

 

Humans are a bunch of hobos part 87.

 

I thought cruises were a floating island of shit stew.  I guess if you want to be wearing your best eveningwear  while purging from both ends, more power to you.

 

On another note,  if any of you happen to be picking up you Christmas Turducken direct from La Boucherie on FM1960,   slide down a few doors and step into Mr Jas the Haberdasher and pick yourself up some New Year's Eve wear.    We used to eat lunch at a place next door 5 or 6 years ago and Mr. Jas had some fine garments on display.  Looking at the FB picture roll, it seems purple paisley print suits have fallen out of favor.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So to bring it in from the other thread.  The commissioned Poole windowpane had me thinking I need to add some variety.  Swiping through the first few dozen examples in google, and then the first stunning specimen appears. $11,495 lulz.  No wonder it looked so much better.  
 

I’m just here to learn.  I rarely need to dress formally.  However, my latest gig has me presenting to a board more often than ever, and explaining what I’m doing with much bigger sums of their money, so going to have to add some nicer wear to the closet soon.     I am a sponge, let’s spend some of my money.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would you really wear patterns in that setting?  I'd lean birdseye or (natural) sharkskin wool to get a bit of interest but still maintaining a monochrome appearance.

What I wear most often are things like donegal, fresco and even cotton.  It dresses down the jacket/suit, so it doesn't seem like I just came from the bank.  Particularly appropriate when I used to visit clients from Croatia to Poland wanted to match that formality without showing them up as external/western firm

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 52-80 said:

Would you really wear patterns in that setting?

Probably not.  But I need to do something other than showing up dressed the same over and over.  Fwiw, my day to day dress is the polar opposite.   The pattern would be nice for the dinners etc that always follow, Id assume? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, fattyflattie said:

Probably not.  But I need to do something other than showing up dressed the same over and over.  Fwiw, my day to day dress is the polar opposite.   The pattern would be nice for the dinners etc that always follow, Id assume? 

I'm definitely not hanging in the circles that require a change of outfit.  Likewise, I really like the idea of chalk stripes, but I'm not sitting on the side of the table where I'd get to wear it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, funny thing, back when lawdogs actually wore suits all the time, there was no hierarchy to follow really.  Junior guys could wear some "powerful" suits if they wanted.  Maybe some firms might frown on younger showing up older.

Now, as suits tend to be worn only when going to court or a client meeting where the client still wears suits, you have to be ultra careful what you wear.  You always have in those settings, but now they are a prime reason to wear suits, whereas years back, just another occasion.

This guy is, by most accounts, a giant penis in the courtroom and out, but he rocks the stripes.

office_brewer_william-1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I got started in sales back in the 90s in the industrial distribution business (safety, welding,  and industrial supplies plus some end user calls) it was always docker style pants and a button down.  If I was in Houston I always had a sport coat with me for about 5-7 of those calls.

Today, I see guys going in with bro jeans and an untucked golf shirt.  My guys are required to have it tucked in, but still, if somebody came to my office this way I wouldnt listen to much of what they had to say.

Get off my lawn. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, 52-80 said:

I'm definitely not hanging in the circles that require a change of outfit.  Likewise, I really like the idea of chalk stripes, but I'm not sitting on the side of the table where I'd get to wear it...

I couldn’t pull those off even if I was in the position.  Just never liked the look.  
 

23 minutes ago, TwiceHorn said:

Now, as suits tend to be worn only when going to court or a client meeting where the client still wears suits, you have to be ultra careful what you wear.  You always have in those settings, but now they are a prime reason to wear suits, whereas years back, just another occasion.

Can you go into more detail on this?  For someone who dressed in slacks/button downs for a decade, but never jacket/tie.  

15 minutes ago, markstanco said:

Today, I see guys going in with bro jeans and an untucked golf shirt.

I don’t understand it either. Last place I was at was a leader in the industry (for real, not just sales bullshit) and the engineers would be in Star Wars t-shirts and shit. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, fattyflattie said:

I couldn’t pull those off even if I was in the position.  Just never liked the look.  
 

Can you go into more detail on this?  For someone who dressed in slacks/button downs for a decade, but never jacket/tie.  

I don’t understand it either. Last place I was at was a leader in the industry (for real, not just sales bullshit) and the engineers would be in Star Wars t-shirts and shit. 

There is thought that doing other than a plain navy or charcoal suit in some circumstances "shows up" or draws too much attention to oneself.  Maybe a narrow, light pinstripe or a very subtle plaid.

More flamboyant suits, like double-breasted, or peaked lapels, or not-subtle plaids or stripes are reserved for the big dogs in some establishments.  And, unless you are a clothes buyer, probably not something you want to wear to a customer/client meeting.  Too much risk of being prejudged.

I'm all for not giving a fuck, but when there's money on the line, discretion is the better part of valor.

This is what 52-80 means about being on the wrong side of the table to wear certain suits.

Edited by TwiceHorn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My rule is that I only do 1 more "thing" than my peers.  So if people do sportcoats, I can wear a suit.  If they wear suit, Ill add ties or french cuffs. 

Any more than that and it's just too much attention.  Which means the pocket squares and peak lapels and waistcoat and etc only show up for social occasions, weddings, etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, TwiceHorn said:

I'm all for not giving a fuck, but when there's money on the line, discretion is the better part of valor.

Yeah I get that. I’m not really the flamboyant type, so your first paragraph is where I stay.  

42 minutes ago, TwiceHorn said:

More flamboyant suits, like double-breasted, or peaked lapels, or not-subtle plaids or stripes are reserved for the big dogs in some establishments.

These are the details I was looking for. 

I found it worth noting that the real money in the room wear the same two-tone Datejust (you know the one) while the younger guys (both execs and not) were wearing 3-4x the watch. Suits were the same, it was the wrist wear that was over the top, at least with the 40-ish yo guys.    

Well, there’s one thing about Thor’s style that I like. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, fattyflattie said:

So to bring it in from the other thread.  The commissioned Poole windowpane had me thinking I need to add some variety.  Swiping through the first few dozen examples in google, and then the first stunning specimen appears. $11,495 lulz.  No wonder it looked so much better.  
 

I’m just here to learn.  I rarely need to dress formally.  However, my latest gig has me presenting to a board more often than ever, and explaining what I’m doing with much bigger sums of their money, so going to have to add some nicer wear to the closet soon.     I am a sponge, let’s spend some of my money.  

 

I'll preface by saying @52-80 advice is very solid. And you don't need to spend 11 grand. A typical Savile Row suit is 5k and you don't have to even go near that far to get quality.

So, firstly, there are no "rules", merely general ideas. It would take literal volumes to run down the theory and practical application of clothes and style, and even that probably wouldn't cover it. To which you are probably saying "Yeah just give me a basic guideline", which is understandable. The reason I bring this up is that if you ever have anyone give you black and white advice with hard and fast rules, immediately discount whatever they say. The answer is always 'it depends'. Clothes carrying massive meaning and messaging. Just because the average American idiot doesn't know this doesn't obviate the fact that it's true. So without getting super esoteric, self knowledge is pretty much the most important part. A suit is an extension of you, and if you aren't comfortable in it, it will be obvious. Doesn't matter the cut, style, fabric or whatever. It may look great on someone else just because of how they wear it and look like ass on you. So, the best advice I can give is know yourself.

That said, I always say start with good navy worsted that fits. Most flexible thing possible, can wear it for any event. I wear a 9oz Smiths slightly lighter than navy (almost but not quite French blue) suit more than everything else put together. It's just so easy to pull of and I'm so relaxed in it. I have all sorts of other stuff, pinstripes, windowpane, PoW etc... that I wear when I am feeling it, but the old blue suit is the mainstay.

For fabric, really depends on climate. I assume a lot of warm weather, so a modern 9oz worsted a good place to start. I've been on a big mohair rampage lately, and that is something I think is a good choice if you don't want plain worsted. Holds creases and shape super well, and provide you don't go over the top with something like Tonik, not crazy shiny. 

 

This is a Holland & Sherry mohair I love. Some birdseye/nailhead, windowpane and plain. I have a steel blue 2 button peak 3 piece out of it which is probably my second most often worn suit. It's definitely a party suit though, be tough in most business settings. A navy though would be totally good. The plain blue below is the same color as the other suit I described above. Great chalk stripe flannel in there also, getting done as a slouchy DB wintertime straight up pajamas suit.

20191218-141403.jpg

 

2 hours ago, TwiceHorn said:

There is thought that doing other than a plain navy or charcoal suit in some circumstances "shows up" or draws too much attention to oneself.  Maybe a narrow, light pinstripe or a very subtle plaid.

More flamboyant suits, like double-breasted, or peaked lapels, or not-subtle plaids or stripes are reserved for the big dogs in some establishments.  And, unless you are a clothes buyer, probably not something you want to wear to a customer/client meeting.  Too much risk of being prejudged.

I'm all for not giving a fuck, but when there's money on the line, discretion is the better part of valor.

This is what 52-80 means about being on the wrong side of the table to wear certain suits.

I don't necessarily agree with this, it's one of those "things".

 

 

1 hour ago, fattyflattie said:

I found it worth noting that the real money in the room wear the same two-tone Datejust (you know the one) .
 

Goddamn right they are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, G650 said:

And you don't need to spend 11 grand.

No need to worry about that. 
 

Appreciate the details.  I do enjoy being well dressed, it just hasn’t been a requirement really, so learning as I go.   I always hear a good Navy is a mainstay, and I would have to agree  But to speak to your point on feeling comfortable, for whatever reason, the blues have never worked for me .   Might just have to keep looking   

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, fattyflattie said:

But to speak to your point on feeling comfortable, for whatever reason, the blues have never worked for me .

Yeah, no worries. Charcoal, mid grey, etc.. All fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still sour I lost my oertel solid stick maple umbrella.  Bought a manufaktur solid stick ash to replace it, but it's not half as nice.  Whoever found it....good on ya

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, G650 said:

 

I'll preface by saying @52-80 advice is very solid. And you don't need to spend 11 grand. A typical Savile Row suit is 5k and you don't have to even go near that far to get quality.

So, firstly, there are no "rules", merely general ideas. It would take literal volumes to run down the theory and practical application of clothes and style, and even that probably wouldn't cover it. To which you are probably saying "Yeah just give me a basic guideline", which is understandable. The reason I bring this up is that if you ever have anyone give you black and white advice with hard and fast rules, immediately discount whatever they say. The answer is always 'it depends'. Clothes carrying massive meaning and messaging. Just because the average American idiot doesn't know this doesn't obviate the fact that it's true. So without getting super esoteric, self knowledge is pretty much the most important part. A suit is an extension of you, and if you aren't comfortable in it, it will be obvious. Doesn't matter the cut, style, fabric or whatever. It may look great on someone else just because of how they wear it and look like ass on you. So, the best advice I can give is know yourself.

That said, I always say start with good navy worsted that fits. Most flexible thing possible, can wear it for any event. I wear a 9oz Smiths slightly lighter than navy (almost but not quite French blue) suit more than everything else put together. It's just so easy to pull of and I'm so relaxed in it. I have all sorts of other stuff, pinstripes, windowpane, PoW etc... that I wear when I am feeling it, but the old blue suit is the mainstay.

For fabric, really depends on climate. I assume a lot of warm weather, so a modern 9oz worsted a good place to start. I've been on a big mohair rampage lately, and that is something I think is a good choice if you don't want plain worsted. Holds creases and shape super well, and provide you don't go over the top with something like Tonik, not crazy shiny. 

 

This is a Holland & Sherry mohair I love. Some birdseye/nailhead, windowpane and plain. I have a steel blue 2 button peak 3 piece out of it which is probably my second most often worn suit. It's definitely a party suit though, be tough in most business settings. A navy though would be totally good. The plain blue below is the same color as the other suit I described above. Great chalk stripe flannel in there also, getting done as a slouchy DB wintertime straight up pajamas suit.

20191218-141403.jpg

 

I don't necessarily agree with this, it's one of those "things".

 

 

Goddamn right they are.

Yeah I don't love the idea myself, but it's other people's problem and sometimes you gotta respect that.

Don't want to have a Patrick Bateman business card scenario on your hands with someone who controls your destiny to some degree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/17/2019 at 3:05 PM, 52-80 said:

I recently moved into a tech office.  Closed-toe shoes are considered formal dress there. 

dark jeans an oxford and a professorial sport coat is basically black tie.  Our old office (when we were more of an old school startup culture) you wore shoes because you don't want your feet on the carpet and you're going to step on a thumbscrew.

I think I'm kinda gradually working my way towards the commercial side of the business out of engineering (i am not a real engineer), and that combined with... shift in preference and feeling less like a kid I've been slowly changing my dress.  Still fairly casual by real standards and leaning heavily on Brooks Brothers, but I shall subscribe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@TwiceHornThat's not exactly what I mean. I don't really subscribe to the theory that someone is going to have a judgment about a subordinate or supplier wearing a pinstripe or not. If you are wearing a purple tux with ruffled shirt? Well yeah, that's probably going to stand out. But in the normal range of suiting fabric, no. Firstly because most people are too ignorant to even pick up on it, and secondly, and most importantly, it's how the wearer projects himself in it. If he is self conscious or outright trying to be fancy, it will be noticed.

Edited by G650

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Celery Man said:

leaning heavily on Brooks Brothers

Honestly, still can't go wrong there. Might pay too much depending, but solid WASPy American clobber.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, G650 said:

@TwiceHornThat's not exactly what I mean. I don't really subscribe to the theory that someone is going to have a judgment about a subordinate or supplier wearing a pinstripe or not. If you are wearing a purple tux with ruffled shirt? Well yeah, that's probably going to stand out. But in the normal range of suiting fabric, no. Firstly because most people are too ignorant to even pick up on it, and secondly, and most importantly, it's how the wearer projects himself in it. If he is self conscious or outright trying to be fancy, it will be noticed.

Fair points. But look at Bill Brewer up there in the dark pin or chalk stripe.  He's gonna rub some folks the wrong way despite not doing anything outrageous.

Also, within some ego-driven businesses, someone who does know what's up may decide he doesn't like your taste or the fact that he's not the best-dressed guy in the room.  Not all people are big enough to think "well done," issue a compliment, and move on.

There's a fine line to walk with a jury between looking appropriately prosperous and competent, and looking flashy and untrustworthy or just like you're larding it on.

The point is to be conscious of your audience.

Edited by TwiceHorn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, TwiceHorn said:

Fair points. But look at Bill Brewer up there in the dark pin or chalk stripe.  He's gonna rub some folks the wrong way despite not doing anything outrageous.

Yeah, because he is a cock face.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, G650 said:

Yeah, because he is a cock face.

In more ways than one.

Also, I think you're right that there are a whole lot of people who will have no idea what they're looking at.  Probably more now than ever before.

Edited by TwiceHorn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, fattyflattie said:

No need to worry about that. 
 

Appreciate the details.  I do enjoy being well dressed, it just hasn’t been a requirement really, so learning as I go.   I always hear a good Navy is a mainstay, and I would have to agree  But to speak to your point on feeling comfortable, for whatever reason, the blues have never worked for me .   Might just have to keep looking   

 

 

 

 

 

What are you presenting to?  When we did our PE deal we didn’t see one tie through over a dozen meetings.  Lots of sport coats without ties.  I’m fully custom tailored but (sadly) there’s not many settings these days where a kickass 3 piece flies.  


I guess w the CEO rule you can dress up or down a couple notches but see mainly casual.  All my pants and ties are custom tailored but just wish a badass suit made more sense more often...

 

And like many others said, no need to drop 11k.  My best ever (Reno Burdi) are around 8k and are gonna match up pretty well vs just about anything out there.  
 

Let’s go with pet peeves:  Tailors that don’t use actual pearl buttons on shirts.  What in the actual fuck?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not fussed over MOPs.  The ones I have are all the thicker stubbier ones and I can't honestly say I prefer them over plastic.  Maybe they don't make thinner ones due to their prone to cracking?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, ChiTownDoc said:

 My best ever (Reno Burdi) are around 8k and are gonna match up pretty well vs just about anything out there.

I've never heard of Burdi doing actual bespoke suiting, only MTM.

 

6 hours ago, 52-80 said:

The ones I have are all the thicker stubbier ones and I can't honestly say I prefer them over plastic.

I'm the opposite. I hate the thin ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, G650 said:

I've never heard of Burdi doing actual bespoke suiting, only MTM.

 

I'm the opposite. I hate the thin ones.

Reno in Chicago can do true bespoke quite well. 
 

No they don’t have to be thin. Put em to your nose. If they’re cold they’re real pearl.  I don’t do the thin ones either.  They look similar but going cheap on $300 shirts is ridiculous.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, ChiTownDoc said:

Reno in Chicago can do true bespoke quite well. 
 

No they don’t have to be thin. Put em to your nose. If they’re cold they’re real pearl.  I don’t do the thin ones either.  They look similar but going cheap on $300 shirts is ridiculous.  

Interesting, the only bespoke tailor I have ever heard of in Chicago is Chris Despos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...