Jump to content

The GQP: Trumpist Death Cult


Recommended Posts

32 minutes ago, Bateshorn said:

 

Ibram X. Kendi, who I would argue is a leading authority on this, states pretty simply that racism is 

I’m sure Corporate America is really scared.  “Oh noes, Mitch, don’t lightly slap my ass, big boy!”

 

Author Ibram X. Kendi defines racism as: 

"Racism is a marriage of racist policies and racist ideas that produces and normalizes racial inequities."  (p. 17-18, How to Be an Antiracist)

Kendi then goes on to define racial inequity, racist policies, and racist ideas.

"Racial inequity is when two or more racial groups are not standing on approximately equal footing." (p. 18)

"A racist policy is any measure that produces or sustains racial inequity between racial groups. By policy, I mean written and unwritten laws, rules, procedures, processes, regulations, and guidelines that govern people." (p. 18)

"A racist idea is any idea that suggests one racial group is inferior to or superior to another racial group in any way. Racist ideas argue that the inferiorities and superiorities of racial groups explain racial inequities in society." (p. 20)

For more on these important distinctions and definitions, read pp. 17-23 of his book, How to Be an Antiracist. 

 

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 11.9k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Yep. I was a George Will/Ronald Reagan/Al Laffer conservative.  I genuinely thought that if you cut taxes for the upper classes, then they would spend and invest and the economic result of that w

Are you all following the beef between Steve Schmidt and Ted Cruz et al on Twitter and I missed seeing it somewhere? It is fascinating. I think The Lincoln Project is getting under certain

So, my attorney wife likes this one local judge who is R. She appears before him regularly, thinks he rules fairly, blah blah blah. Apparently the winner of the Democratic nom is an asshat who she thi

Posted Images

28 minutes ago, Bateshorn said:

I’m sure Corporate America is really scared.  “Oh noes, Mitch, don’t lightly slap my ass, big boy!”

Exactly.

In addition, we are three months out of an attempted coup and other than some low level folks facing charges for which few will spend significant time confined, there are a large number of citizens who lied in advance about fraud, lied about the election results, funded the coup attempt, publicized the events leading to the attempt, and were fine with the attempt. Afterwards, they scrubbed their social media, spent significant time on broadcast television lying, gaslighting, and downplaying their part in the attempt and have faced no repercussions whatsoever.

Call me when they and corporate America actually give a damn about what the electorate and consumers want.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Mrs Whiggins said:

Call me when they and corporate America actually give a damn about what the electorate and consumers want.

What consumers want is one thing. What consumers will pay for is entirely another. It's a cynical calculation, but occasionally it works for good. Sure, but accident, but I'll take it when it happens.

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Walden Ponderer said:

What consumers want is one thing. What consumers will pay for is entirely another. It's a cynical calculation, but occasionally it works for good. Sure, but accident, but I'll take it when it happens.

It's going to be interesting as Millennials and Gen Z  take over as the largest spending demographics and force corporations to pay more attention to social issues. Can you imagine a 2022 midterm without Republican coffers stuffed to the rafters with corporate money?   

Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Pescado_Rojo said:

It's going to be interesting as Millennials and Gen Z  take over as the largest spending demographics and force corporations to pay more attention to social issues. Can you imagine a 2022 midterm without Republican coffers stuffed to the rafters with corporate money?   

Nope. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TheStoicPaisano said:

Cotton must be thirsty with DeSantis in the spotlight this past weekend.

 

He’s talking about black people and I’ll bet he’s invested in the private prison industry. 

  • Rage+1 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TheStoicPaisano said:

Cotton must be thirsty with DeSantis in the spotlight this past weekend.

 

Pretty sure we put more people in jail than any other country -- by a wide margin.

Maybe we should start looking at causes and not "cures."

Cotton is a senator from the state that just overrode the governor's veto of an anti-trans bill.  

Edited by Bullneck
Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, DigglerontheHoof said:

Are you fist-fucking kidding me?  Holy. Shit.

 

Pick whatever extreme position you want that involves human suffering to some degree.  Maybe whatever you picked out has already happened in our country, or some other country.  Doesn't matter what it is, or how horrifying it may be. 

Some GOP elected official will publicly stake out a position in favor of whatever scenario you just picked out, and do it with a straight face.  If another GOP official spoke favorably of whatever you chose, others will follow along soon enough proclaiming whatever abhorrent position that is isn't enough, and we need do to more because the future of the country is at stake.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Placing this here since the complaint was regarding an RNC video and the ethics complaint filed with USOSC. Patton violated the Hatch Act and is barred for four years from federal employment. (Four seems convenient IMO as it covers a term but I'd prefer to see eight to make it more difficult to implement the usual revolving door policy.

Here is an article: https://www.newsweek.com/lynne-patton-punishment-gratifying-says-ethics-group-that-complained-about-ex-trump-official-1581467

But the best summation is here in this tweet; while I agree that going after violations is important, why not go for the larger violations first?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Patricio Swayze said:

Absolutely batshit crazy idiots. 
 

spacer.png

I mean, I'm guessing the craziest shit in this picture is actually the fucking bumper, which I'm guessing is the written out second amendment. Fuck. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
I mean, I'm guessing the craziest shit in this picture is actually the fucking bumper, which I'm guessing is the written out second amendment. Fuck. 

It is.

Also like the fuck Biden and fuck you if you voted for him sticker. I just think these people are unstable lunatics if you have to put all that shit on your car.
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Willfully Horn said:

The wife told me she saw a truck, two days ago, with a sticker that paired the  okay hand sign with the words, “Fuck you.”

So a blatant white supremacist?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

 

A former Trump administration official and GOP House candidate on Monday filed a lawsuit accusing the Texas Tribune of defaming her when it referred to her anti-Chinese immigrant comments as “racist.”


Sery Kim, a Korean American who previously served in Donald Trump’s Small Business Administration (SBA) came under fire last week after saying during a Republican party immigration forum in Arlington that she didn’t want immigrants from China to come to the United States.


“I don’t want them here at all,” Kim said in response to a question about potential Chinese immigrants. “They steal our intellectual property, they give us coronavirus, they don’t hold themselves accountable.”

She added, “And quite frankly, I can say that because I’m Korean.”

Reps. Young Kim and Michelle Steele of California — the first Korean American Republican women to serve in Congress — released a joint statement two days later pulling their support for Kim, saying they “cannot in good conscious continue to support her candidacy.”

The Austin newspaper article at the center of Sery Kim’s lawsuit, titled “GOP congressional candidate in Texas special election loses prominent supporters after racist comment about Chinese immigrants,” focused largely on Young Kim and Steele’s reactions to the anti-Chinese immigrant comments.

In the lawsuit, which Kim filed pro se (without an attorney) in Tarrant County District Court, the first-time congressional candidate made several eye-brow raising choices, beginning with her decision to reproduce a series of racist, vile emails that she received as a result of the Tribune’s reporting. Kim, who graduated from the University of Texas School of Law, claimed the Tribune should have published the hate mail sent to her instead of simply saying she was “facing intense backlash.”

“The Texas Tribune fails to reproduce the ‘intense backlash’ which they were given examples of directly by Sery Kim,” the suit stated, followed by expletive-ridden verbatim quotes from unverified email addresses. “The Texas Tribune racist comments article validated these disgusting comments by simply dismissing these three examples of obscene hatred as ‘intense backlash.’”

Kim also alleged that the Tribune acted with “actual malice”—publishing statements known to be false or acting with reckless disregard for the truth—because they waited a few days to publish the article.

“By choosing to write the story, almost four days after the event, The Texas Tribune intentionally republished with actual malice a fresh take on the story,” Kim wrote, citing to three other outlets that did write about the forum.

“The Texas Tribune did not write a story at 12:01 am, Saturday, April 3, 2021, and throughout the entire daylight hours when, for a second day in a row, Sery Kim was on the front cover of The Drudge Report and several more national publications such as Bloomberg wrote a story about Sery Kim speaking up against the Chinese Communist Party.”

Kim then appears to confirm that she said exactly what the Tribune article stated she said.

“Even the only reporter physically present at the March 31, 2021 forum, Gromer Jeffers, wrote an article published on April 1, 2021 in the Dallas Morning News, headlined “I don’t want them here at all,” Texas GOP congressional candidate says about Chinese immigrants,” Kim wrote.

Thus, her entire lawsuit, which seeks $10 million in damages, is based on whether or not her anti-Chinese immigrant comments can be classified as “racist,” which is almost certainly a matter of opinion that is not actionable. The Tribune referred to Kim’s comments as racist but never said Kim herself was a racist.

Kim also claimed she “is not a public figure” for purposes of defamation despite touting her accomplishments as a public servant under George W. Bush, President Trump, and Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), and repeatedly noting how she has been covered by local and national news outlets.

https://www.scribd.com/document/501787734/Sery-Kim-10-Million-Defamation-Lawsuit-Against-the-Texas-Tribune#from_embed

Edited by Beau Vine
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TheStoicPaisano said:

Mediocre white man nepotism alert.

 

Getting kicked off the Duke lacrosse team for being too much of an asshole is like being a pirate and getting kicked off the pirate ship for doing too much raping and pillaging. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
What is the deal with radical Republicans and using the word “woke” all the time?  

Here’s my amateur sociological theory.

“Woke” - like almost all current slang and internet speak - generates from Black Twitter.

In the 90s it was “Political Correctness” but that doesn’t dog whistle like “woke”.

Ergo, they favor the word that their “audience” knows has something nebulous to do with Black America so it will tickle their bigotry and make them dismiss it out of hand because it’s a “thing for THOSE people”.

They’re doing the same cycle with “cancel culture”.
  • Hook 'Em 2
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/07/us/politics/republicans-donations-trump.html

 

Quote

The political arm of House Republicans is deploying a prechecked box to enroll donors into repeating monthly donations — and using ominous language to warn them of the consequences if they opt out: “If you UNCHECK this box, we will have to tell Trump you’re a DEFECTOR.”

oakImage-1617818388755-jumbo.png?quality

 

Quote

The language appears to be an effort by the National Republican Congressional Committee to increase its volume of recurring donations, which are highly lucrative, while invoking former President Donald J. Trump’s popularity with the conservative base. Those donors who do not proactively uncheck the box will have their credit cards billed or bank accounts deducted for donations every month.

 

Quote

The prechecked box is the same tactic and tool that resulted in a surge of refunds and credit card complaints when used by Mr. Trump’s campaign last year, according to an investigation published by The New York Times over the weekend. The Trump operation made the language inside its prechecked boxes increasingly opaque as the election neared. Consumer advocates and user-interface designers said the prechecked boxes were a “dark pattern” intended to deceive Mr. Trump’s supporters.

 

Spoiler

The Trump operation issued more than $122 million in refunds in the 2020 cycle, which was 10.7 percent of what Mr. Trump’s campaign, the Republican National Committee and their shared accounts raised. Refunds increased as the campaign began prechecking the boxes, which at one point withdrew donations every week as well as introduced a “money bomb” that doubled a contribution.

After the Times investigation, the R.N.C., the party’s central organization, adjusted the language on its own donation portal, which is linked to in its fund-raising emails and from its home page, to make it clearer that repeat donations would be withdrawn.

“Keep this box checked to make this a monthly recurring donation,” says the new language in bold.

The box remains prechecked, and the R.N.C. declined to comment on the change.

oakImage-1617816813991-jumbo.png?quality

Michael McAdams, a spokesman for the N.R.C.C., said the committee “employs the same standards that are accepted and utilized by Democrats and Republicans across the digital fund-raising ecosystem.”

The prechecked box is a tool provided by WinRed, the for-profit Republican donation platform founded in 2019. The Democratic platform, ActBlue, also allows some groups to precheck recurring donation boxes, including the political arm of House Democrats, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

The Bulwark, an anti-Trump conservative news site, first reported a different version of a prechecked box that the N.R.C.C. was using on Wednesday, which said: “Check this box if you want Trump to run again. Uncheck this box if you do NOT stand with Trump.”

Political parties and campaigns typically test multiple language options to see which net the most donors. The “DEFECTOR” warning appears on the donation page linked from the N.R.C.C.’s home page.

It seems highly unlikely any such list of defectors would ever actually be presented to Mr. Trump. Last month, Mr. Trump sent a cease-and-desist letter to the N.R.C.C. and other Republican Party committees warning them not to use his name or likeness to raise money.

The language on the N.R.C.C.’s donation portal appears relatively new, although the prechecked box has been there before, according to records preserved by the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine.

In March, the recurring box read, “Trump said he’ll run for President if we win back the House! If every Patriot makes their donation monthly, Republicans WIN.”

Mr. Trump has not said that.

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Francisco 2.0 said:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/07/us/politics/republicans-donations-trump.html

 

 

 

 

  Reveal hidden contents

The Trump operation issued more than $122 million in refunds in the 2020 cycle, which was 10.7 percent of what Mr. Trump’s campaign, the Republican National Committee and their shared accounts raised. Refunds increased as the campaign began prechecking the boxes, which at one point withdrew donations every week as well as introduced a “money bomb” that doubled a contribution.

After the Times investigation, the R.N.C., the party’s central organization, adjusted the language on its own donation portal, which is linked to in its fund-raising emails and from its home page, to make it clearer that repeat donations would be withdrawn.

“Keep this box checked to make this a monthly recurring donation,” says the new language in bold.

The box remains prechecked, and the R.N.C. declined to comment on the change.

oakImage-1617816813991-jumbo.png?quality

Michael McAdams, a spokesman for the N.R.C.C., said the committee “employs the same standards that are accepted and utilized by Democrats and Republicans across the digital fund-raising ecosystem.”

The prechecked box is a tool provided by WinRed, the for-profit Republican donation platform founded in 2019. The Democratic platform, ActBlue, also allows some groups to precheck recurring donation boxes, including the political arm of House Democrats, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

The Bulwark, an anti-Trump conservative news site, first reported a different version of a prechecked box that the N.R.C.C. was using on Wednesday, which said: “Check this box if you want Trump to run again. Uncheck this box if you do NOT stand with Trump.”

Political parties and campaigns typically test multiple language options to see which net the most donors. The “DEFECTOR” warning appears on the donation page linked from the N.R.C.C.’s home page.

It seems highly unlikely any such list of defectors would ever actually be presented to Mr. Trump. Last month, Mr. Trump sent a cease-and-desist letter to the N.R.C.C. and other Republican Party committees warning them not to use his name or likeness to raise money.

The language on the N.R.C.C.’s donation portal appears relatively new, although the prechecked box has been there before, according to records preserved by the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine.

In March, the recurring box read, “Trump said he’ll run for President if we win back the House! If every Patriot makes their donation monthly, Republicans WIN.”

Mr. Trump has not said that.

 

It's sad that their strategy is "We'll tell the orange god you don't like him!" and even sadder that it will work.

Link to post
Share on other sites
It's going to be interesting as Millennials and Gen Z  take over as the largest spending demographics and force corporations to pay more attention to social issues. Can you imagine a 2022 midterm without Republican coffers stuffed to the rafters with corporate money?   

It is already happening enough to make VP level ESG(environmental, sustainability, governance) officers a rapidly growing field in corporate America.
  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, ShaggyBevo RIP said:


It is already happening enough to make VP level ESG(environmental, sustainably, governance) officers a thing in corporate America.

I work for a kinda touchy-feelie industry anyway, but we have a "Socially Impactful Investments" strategy for our portfolio. Reinvestment has to have a socially impactful footprint before we'll expand, even on non-socially impactful initiatives. Not a lot of practical difference between that and what we would do anyway, but it sounds good and makes some people sleep better at night, plus it pisses off Trumpkins, so I call it a silly win.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Bama Chick said:

ATTENTION [mention]RDCanecutter [/mention]

 

 


The reporter pulled a “This you????”.

485e0c74af18fc40a8ab26e7378b804f.jpg
757f1363b84529a478b2060a31630e5d.jpg
42f63f5c8343ec55aff76ebfb1e31699.jpg
f1504b7c83e4b7c163a726e723d3c635.jpg
2f2d53a08e7d3ab1960268f5a08e11fb.jpg


She’s the one on our left.

He liked assplay and his balls are lopsided lol.

 

every man's balls are lopsided. just like no two real tits are the same size. right guys? guys?

  • Hook 'Em 3
  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Bama Chick said:

ATTENTION [mention]RDCanecutter [/mention]

 

 


The reporter pulled a “This you????”.

485e0c74af18fc40a8ab26e7378b804f.jpg
757f1363b84529a478b2060a31630e5d.jpg
42f63f5c8343ec55aff76ebfb1e31699.jpg
f1504b7c83e4b7c163a726e723d3c635.jpg
2f2d53a08e7d3ab1960268f5a08e11fb.jpg


She’s the one on our left.

He liked assplay and his balls are lopsided lol.

 

Well bless their hearts.

A few take-aways:

--Who names their girlchild "Cesaire?" Was "Man McMan-Face" already taken?

--I never knew that Merrill looked like a sentient Vienna Sausage.

--She seems stabby. Hope nobody gets stabbed.

--Is this cocaine, or inbreeding?

--When I saw the name "Cesaire McPherson," I thought he was carrying on with the Haitian-Scottish poolboy. But the week is yet young.

--I would still rather have Buttplug Mutant-Balls Merrill and his stabby First Crazy Lady as our next senator, than Mo Brooks. Merrill is still better for the state than Mo Brooks.

Edited by RDCanecutter
if you must have a reason it is that my thoughts are constantly morphing and developing like the bacteria on a recently used buttplug next to a bed in MontGUMMRY AlaBAMMUH.
  • Hook 'Em 1
  • Haha 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ShaggyBevo RIP said:


It is already happening enough to make VP level ESG(environmental, sustainability, governance) officers a rapidly growing field in corporate America.

Won’t that just mean changing the person’s title from VP of Diversity and Inclusion since that’s being replaced with ESG?

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, SydneyCarton said:

I mean, I'm guessing the craziest shit in this picture is actually the fucking bumper, which I'm guessing is the written out second amendment. Fuck. 

Or a Bible verse.

  • Drool 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Brandywine said:

Or a Bible verse.

Is there a Bible verse that means more or less "Stop being a Dumb-Ass"? Because I want to make a sticker out of it in either Greek or Hebrew so the cops can pull me over because it's foreign.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.thedailybeast.com/a-whole-bunch-of-crazy-inside-the-south-carolina-gops-maga-coup?ref=home?ref=home

 

Quote

When Lenna Smith arrived at her precinct’s annual Republican Party organizing meeting last month, she didn’t expect to be greeted by a dozen strangers.

Smith has been a fixture in GOP politics in Greenville, South Carolina, for 30 years. As a prominent anti-abortion activist, she has in her rolodex nearly everyone notable or influential in conservative circles in the state’s most populous county. She is on a first-name basis with past governors.

 

Quote

So, when Smith walked into a church function room for her precinct meeting on March 22 and saw people who’d never participated in local GOP politics, she was a little unnerved. As precinct president, it was Smith’s job to run the meeting, and she simply chalked up the new faces as “neighbors I’ve never met.”

But what happened next was totally out of her control. When it came time to elect the precinct’s president for the coming year, one of the newcomers nominated a fellow newcomer, but not a single person nominated Smith. Stunned, she had to nominate herself. “That was a little disheartening,” she said.

 

Quote

When it came time to vote, the outcome was a foregone conclusion: Smith had lost the president position she’d held for years. For the vote on the next most senior office, the same thing happened, and then the next, until there were no more offices left. Smith had been totally shut out.

“I came home, and told my husband, I was just booted out,” Smith told The Daily Beast. “Do these people see me as what I’m not?” she recalled wondering. “Did I offend them?”

 

Spoiler

What happened in Smith’s precinct was no one-off oddity; that night, longtime party activists were similarly ejected from their positions at meetings across Greenville County after hundreds of new faces showed up, seemingly out of the woodwork. The GOP loyalists did not know them, but the newcomers seemed to know the process, and they took advantage of it to jettison longtime officials.

Smith, and others, seemed to offend simply by having a whiff of experience in local politics, a black mark that was linked to the worst possible offense to the GOP base: not doing enough to support Donald Trump in the wake of the 2020 election.

Since Trump’s defeat and the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, the MAGA faithful around the country have been restless. State-level activists have led the charge nationally in loudly criticizing and plotting against any Republican perceived to be an enemy of the Trump movement, from members of Congress who voted to impeach the ex-president to local officials seen as being weak or soft when it counted.

The phenomenon is not unique to this pocket of South Carolina, but the fight unspooling here is a powerful microcosm of the dynamics in a national tug-of-war over the direction of the Republican Party after Trump’s presidency.

“A behind-the-scenes battle is happening,” said a Republican operative in the state, “between establishment forces, such as they are in the current GOP, and the far-right, QAnon-believing Trump supporters who want to take over this county party.”

The figure at the vanguard of that latter camp is Pressley Stutts, a local Tea Party leader who has been a thorn in the side of allegedly establishment “RINOs”—Republicans in name only—for years.

 

Like many Republicans, Stutts has followed the ex-president and right-wing media into a morass of conspiracy theories that the election was rigged, and the feckless Republican politicians and officials he’d derided for years were doing nothing to stop it. That rhetoric fomented the attack on the Capitol on Jan. 6; Stutts, in fact, was proudly there that day.

Beginning in December, Stutts and his allies have undertaken a sweeping campaign to train rank-and-file voters—“people who understand President Trump’s MAGA agenda and live by it,” as he wrote on Facebook—on how to wield power in local party politics. From the ground up, they’re planning to oust and replace officials all the way to the state party. Stutts, who is aiming for a leadership position in the Greenville County GOP, has encouraged Lin Wood, the Atlanta lawyer who has become an icon to the conspiracy-obsessed right, in his nascent bid for the state GOP chairmanship after he left Georgia for South Carolina.

“There are a lot of good people that did lose their positions. Some are my friends,” Stutts admitted, reached by The Daily Beast on Tuesday. “Some people say, ‘Pressley, what have you done?’”

But Stutts said that Trump’s instructions to the faithful were clear. “He said, ‘Go purge, get rid of the RINOs in the Republican Party.’ So we took him seriously.”

Greenville County is a fitting stage for such a drama. It is South Carolina’s most populous county, and it’s considered the most conservative region in this already ruby-red state. Local Republicans proudly consider their local GOP to be the most influential and a required stop for presidential hopefuls seeking an edge in South Carolina’s critical early primary.

Longtime activists here worry that reputation—and their ability to continue dominating South Carolina elections—will erode if the newcomers take control. Suzette Jordan, who has been a GOP activist in Greenville for three decades, said that those ousted have institutional knowledge and skills that have helped the party win elections and build influence. That, she says, seems to be lost on Stutts and his ilk.

“It’s frustrating to think the party may be turned over to people who have different goals from what we’ve had for years,” she told The Daily Beast. “Their goal is to replace us all. They may succeed.”

Jordan, who used to work for the area’s former congressman, Trey Gowdy, is not running for another term for a seat on the state party’s executive committee. But she couldn’t manage to get elected to a minor precinct position, even after she pointedly informed her precinct that she was just one of a few South Carolinians to cast a vote for Trump as a member of the Electoral College.

“We’ve been accused of being establishment, being not MAGA enough, whatever that means,” said Jordan. “Afterward, a lady stepped up and said, ‘Congratulations on being an elector!’ It was kind of ironic to me. None of that mattered.”

Nate Leupp, the current chairman of the Greenville County GOP, estimated that about 30 percent of the county’s precincts were targeted by the outsider faction on the night of March 22. Their message, he told The Daily Beast, was clear: “We are MAGA, and we’re here to take over.”

But Leupp couldn’t help but notice a personal dimension to the effort. He is an active Trump supporter, and as chair, he has organized local Republicans to travel to greet the ex-president in his visits as far away as Charlotte, North Carolina. But when he was making the rounds at precincts that night and introduced himself, Leupp said attendees “looked at me like I was Satan.” He is not running for another term as county chairman.

The notion of this deep-red county crowded with RINOs has been routinely advanced by Stutts, who lost to Leupp in a bid for the party’s chairmanship in 2019. Their acrimonious showdown included an accusation from Stutts that Leupp stole a bathrobe from the Trump hotel in D.C.—Leupp says he did not—and surfaced Stutts’ personal financial debts to the state of North Carolina and the IRS.

 

But the GOP base’s widespread dissatisfaction with the establishment’s handling of the 2020 election has supercharged longstanding concerns, giving Stutts and like-minded allies their best chance yet to oust local and state leaders. Stutts claimed to The Daily Beast that his organizing coalition turned out 1,400 people to precinct meetings across Greenville County in March “because the people are pissed, they want their country back.”

Facebook has been a key organizing tool. Stutts has built a following on the platform—despite suffering the occasional ban due to alleged censorship—and his posts since November read like a real-time diary of the MAGA movement’s increasingly frantic hopes that Trump could cling to power. On Facebook, Stutts has interspersed broadsides against local Republicans with repostings of QAnon-inflected fantasies of mass hangings of “deep state” traitors alongside inspirational memes and photos of dogs. “Judgement day,” read one meme he shared, “will not be rigged.”

Stutts also posted numerous photos of the Jan. 6 rally and subsequent riot, including selfies with Infowars host Alex Jones and rally organizer Ali Alexander. One early post from the day, with a photo of the mob clamoring up the inauguration stand on the Capitol’s West Front, had the cheer-leading message “Trump supporters breach the Capitol!”

However, Stutts later embraced the conspiracy theory that it was “antifa,” not Trump supporters, who were responsible for the violence—even comparing it to Kristallnacht, a night of coordinated violence carried out in Germany by Nazi paramilitary squads against Jews in 1938. Federal court proceedings have found, of course, that many of the people who broke into the Capitol and attacked police officers belonged to far-right militia groups, or at least were Trump supporters, not antifa.

Pressed on this, Stutts maintained that he was certain of antifa’s presence on Jan. 6 despite having no evidence. He insisted he does not embrace QAnon despite having posted Q-friendly content. “Don’t even go up that tree,” he told The Daily Beast.

It’s no surprise that Stutts and his supporters have found common cause with Lin Wood, the Trump-supporting lawyer so extreme that even Team Trump has distanced itself from him. Georgia Republicans blame Wood’s fervent promotion of election conspiracies in his prior home state for contributing to the party’s loss in a pair of Jan. 5 Senate runoffs.

“Pressley and some of his friends came to me a few days ago and raised with me the question of whether I would consider running for chairman of the Republican Party,” said Wood on March 31. Heeding their call, he decided to get in and challenge Drew McKissick, who has been twice endorsed by Trump.

After a discussion of Wood’s unfounded conspiracy claims that Chief Justice John Roberts is linked to Jeffrey Epstein, a caller asked Wood why he would challenge someone who’s secured Trump’s backing. Wood replied that people like McKissick “say the right things, they seem to even embrace President Trump, but when the tough calls have to be made, it seems like they don’t walk the walk, they don’t back up their words.”

Few have taken Wood’s long-shot bid for party chairman seriously, but Stutts and his allies have laid at least some groundwork for him. By replacing activists like Jordan and Smith with a legion of newcomers at the precinct level, they can ensure support for their slate of candidates at the county convention scheduled for April 13; from there, they can send delegates to the state convention in May, which will vote on the party chairmanship. “A whole bunch of crazy,” said Leupp, “is going to happen in the next week.”

Some established Republicans cast the apparent change in the guard as a cyclical part of the political process. “When an event or a candidate or an issue captures the attention of those who have been sitting on the sidelines, they are then motivated to ‘get involved’ and ‘take back the party,’” said Chad Groover, a former chairman of the Greenville GOP. But he added that many of those being taken out were loyal supporters of Trump.

“The grassroots activists working the hardest for President Trump’s re-election were the County Party officers and executive committeeman,” Groover said. “So it is disappointing that these same people are being cast aside for precinct and county party leadership roles by individuals who have just recently—many just since November—decided to get involved.”

Smith, the longtime activist ousted in her home precinct, isn’t taking her defeat personally. “Hopefully,” she said of the people who replaced her, “they’ll all jump in and become great leaders and great spokesmen and be what we want the party to be.” Still, Smith can’t help but wonder about them. “I don’t have a history with them,” she said. “That makes me wonder, where have you been?”

For the first time in decades of involvement with the GOP, Smith will have more hours in the day to contemplate these questions. “I guess,” she said, “I’ll be spending more time in my garden this year.”

 

  • Fuck Around and Find Out 1
  • Rage+1 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't decide whether that DB article is awesome or terrifying.  

On one hand, I *THINK* that these people are going to lose interest in all of this soon and it will leave the GOP in shambles.  OTOH, crazy people with any power is a bad thing.

  • Hook 'Em 4
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Beau Vine said:

I can't decide whether that DB article is awesome or terrifying.  

On one hand, I *THINK* that these people are going to lose interest in all of this soon and it will leave the GOP in shambles.  OTOH, crazy people with any power is a bad thing.

No kidding. That was why Scott Pressler was brought up recently. He is flying coast to coast doing this in exactly the same way. Do you want cult minded people manning elections? I don't.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bama Chick said:

ATTENTION [mention]RDCanecutter [/mention]

 

 


The reporter pulled a “This you????”.

485e0c74af18fc40a8ab26e7378b804f.jpg
757f1363b84529a478b2060a31630e5d.jpg
42f63f5c8343ec55aff76ebfb1e31699.jpg
f1504b7c83e4b7c163a726e723d3c635.jpg
2f2d53a08e7d3ab1960268f5a08e11fb.jpg


She’s the one on our left.

He liked assplay and his balls are lopsided lol.

 

This was a comment:

 

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
×
×
  • Create New...