Jump to content

Ukraine War


Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, Longhorn_Fan68 said:

so we got it covered then? cool cool

Americans do. The impoverished nations are in for some really bad times.

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, F250 said:

Americans do. The impoverished nations are in for some really bad times.

Assad better batten down the hatches and get ready to gas some folks.  Russians now don’t have as much of a presence there, and I’m sure there will be quite a few hungry folks in Syria.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The food shortage is going to hit hardest in the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa. Europe will be staring down another migrant wave like the one in 2015-16.  This is really good for Putin, it will spark populist backlash and fracture Europe.  You’ll have lots of voices arguing that the migrants are a far larger threat than Russia in Ukraine. This is going to be compounded by a struggling economy and inflation and it’s going to resonate. Putin is playing a really long game here. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, 956 Worldwide said:

The food shortage is going to hit hardest in the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa. Europe will be staring down another migrant wave like the one in 2015-16.  This is really good for Putin, it will spark populist backlash and fracture Europe.  You’ll have lots of voices arguing that the migrants are a far larger threat than Russia in Ukraine. This is going to be compounded by a struggling economy and inflation and it’s going to resonate. Putin is playing a really long game here. 

Ha! You think their army and economy can survive that long? 

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, 956 Worldwide said:

The food shortage is going to hit hardest in the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa. Europe will be staring down another migrant wave like the one in 2015-16.  This is really good for Putin, it will spark populist backlash and fracture Europe.  You’ll have lots of voices arguing that the migrants are a far larger threat than Russia in Ukraine. This is going to be compounded by a struggling economy and inflation and it’s going to resonate. Putin is playing a really long game here. 

Does the West have a stomach for all of this and inflation going bonkers?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Parliament said:

Does the West have a stomach for all of this and inflation going bonkers?

I honestly don’t know. This is a pain point that the Kremlin understands very well. There’s going to be some real pressure on central and Western Europe especially.  In the medium term Putin, with control over his media, repressive instruments, no accountability and a population accustomed to hardship can buckle down.  The West needs to be working to help Ukraine win NOW.  

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, 956 Worldwide said:

 Putin is playing a really long game here. 

I used to think Putin could play a long game, but given how badly he fucked up in Ukraine, and how badly his state media is handling Ukraine - making everybody think everything is going according to plan, which ties his hands and means he can't declare war and start conscripting people/mobilizing more reserves, the motherfucker has about a 4th grade understanding of Russian history and a 5th grade understanding of how to recreate it.

  • Hook 'Em 4
  • Fuck Around and Find Out 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, atomheartbevo said:

I used to think Putin could play a long game, but given how badly he fucked up in Ukraine, and how badly his state media is handling Ukraine - making everybody think everything is going according to plan, which ties his hands and means he can't declare war and start conscripting people/mobilizing more reserves, the motherfucker has about a 4th grade understanding of Russian history and a 5th grade understanding of how to recreate it.

The Russians must be in awe at the number of Nazis in Ukraine. 

  • Hook 'Em 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Longhorn_Fan68 said:

only took them 3 months, but I guess better late than never?

 

In fairness, it took them that long to figure out the name of the country they were supposed to be pulling out of from the way it was written on the memo -- some dude kept reading it and saying "Rugsam....order to shut down operations for Rugsam!"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Brisketexan said:

In fairness, it took them that long to figure out the name of the country they were supposed to be pulling out of from the way it was written on the memo -- some dude kept reading it and saying "Rugsam....order to shut down operations for Rugsam!"

GIF by reactionseditor

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Saw this last night while I was searching for the latest tally on the death toll of Russian soldiers in Ukraine (to which I didn’t find a good answer):

https://www.businessinsider.com/russias-top-snipers-killed-in-ukraine-2022-5

Quote

A top Russian army sniper has been killed in Ukraine, say reports, in the latest blow to the military prowess of Putin's forces

Russia has reported losing one of its best snipers in Ukraine, as its death toll continues to mount three months into the war, reports say.

Junior Sergeant Sergei Tsarkov, 38, died during a "special operation in Ukraine," the military commissariat of the region told the Russian outlet chita.ru.

Tsarkov, who was born in the town Borzya, was the commander of a rifle squad of snipers of the 1st rifle platoon based in Transbaikalia, eastern Russia, the outlet reported.

"He was the best sniper in the brigade. Everyone respected him very much, he was a professional, he had authority. No one could believe that this could happen to him," the military commissariat said, according to the outlet.

The department said that Tsarkov regularly participated in and won international army games in the Sniper Frontier competition.

His funeral took place on April 10, but his death was first reported by Russian media on May 18. Images appear to show a full military funeral, with a man weeping beside the casket draped in the Russian flag. He was posthumously awarded the Order of Courage, chita.ru said.

 

  • Hook 'Em 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

As I'm sure many of you have realized...

This has devolved purely into a war over oil and gas. If Ukraine can retake the Donbas and Mariupal region they have access to vast untapped reserves they were just opening up to the west (exxon, shell, etc), and can permanently replace Russia as Europe's primary supplier.

This is why Russia doesn't give a fuck if there's anything left of these cities, they just need to displace Ukrainians and dominate the region. They intend to land lock ukraine, and secure their own long(er) term future as a gas station. It's really all they have so it will take a lot more than low Russian soldier morale or high casualties to make them give up. 

Edited by B00M
  • Hook 'Em 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, Pescado_Rojo said:

FoolishBothHairstreak-max-1mb.gif

The question is, do the Taiwanese have as strong a Twitter game as the Ukrainians?  If so, I'd eagerly await the tweets about Chinese officers being taken out, perhaps accompanied with ...

f02210a0-d3c8-439a-a8bd-99fd8a4703a8_tex

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/22/2022 at 1:38 AM, 956 Worldwide said:

The food shortage is going to hit hardest in the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa. Europe will be staring down another migrant wave like the one in 2015-16.  This is really good for Putin, it will spark populist backlash and fracture Europe.  You’ll have lots of voices arguing that the migrants are a far larger threat than Russia in Ukraine. This is going to be compounded by a struggling economy and inflation and it’s going to resonate. Putin is playing a really long game here. 

Your boy Ned gonna have to step up his game. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/2/2022 at 9:19 PM, Gap03 said:

The question is, do the Taiwanese have as strong a Twitter game as the Ukrainians?  If so, I'd eagerly await the tweets about Chinese officers being taken out, perhaps accompanied with ...

f02210a0-d3c8-439a-a8bd-99fd8a4703a8_tex

One of the best movie comedy scenes of the 80s. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/2/2022 at 10:19 PM, Gap03 said:

The question is, do the Taiwanese have as strong a Twitter game as the Ukrainians?  If so, I'd eagerly await the tweets about Chinese officers being taken out, perhaps accompanied with ...

f02210a0-d3c8-439a-a8bd-99fd8a4703a8_tex

Oto-mo-biiile?

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, AnTiM said:

Now French president Macron is saying that Ukraine should be careful not to embarrass Russia?  KMEA!  Some things never change.

in one manner of thinking, it's a dig. it's already embarrassing. and Macron is pointing it out without saying it 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Longhorn_Fan68 said:

in one manner of thinking, it's a dig. it's already embarrassing. and Macron is pointing it out without saying it 

Sorry, no parlez Francais

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Caponata said:

 

1 minute ago, Longhorn_Fan68 said:

oh, well, in that case, let Putin have Ukraine.🙄

That's clearly the point of sharing this post.

BUT, setting aside the poster's consistent agenda, the underlying point is true, and is something western powers should be accounting and planning for already.  There are a shitload of serious and portable weapons (MANPADS and switchblades and javelins etc.) flowing into the theater, and as is the case with every modern weapon-heavy conflict.....there will be some spillover of those weapons into the world at large.

Interdicting them (one of the easiest ways would be to set up straw purchases on the black market, so start setting up straw arms buyers now) should be something we're already working on.  Yeah, buying back our own weapons on the black market seems silly....but not sillier than letting them go to bad actor third parties.

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another Russian general killed in Ukraine. This one confirmed by Russia. The Russians put the total at 4, the Ukrainians put it at 13, Western intelligence puts it somewhere in between.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-61702862

Quote

Ukraine war: Another Russian general killed by Ukrainian forces - reports

By Matt Murphy
BBC News
Published1 day ago

Russian state media have confirmed the death of one of Moscow's top generals during heavy fighting in Ukraine's eastern Donbas region.

Maj Gen Roman Kutuzov was killed leading an assault on a Ukrainian settlement in the region, a reporter with the state-owned Rossiya 1 said.

Alexander Sladkov said Gen Kutuzov had been commanding troops from the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic.

Russia's defence ministry has not commented on the reports.

"The general had led soldiers into attack, as if there are not enough colonels," Mr Sladkov wrote on the Telegram social media app. "On the other hand, Roman was the same commander as everyone else, albeit a higher rank."

Ukraine's military also confirmed the killing of Gen Kutuzov, without offering further details about the circumstances.

His death comes as rumours circulated on social media that a second senior officer, Lt Gen Roman Berdnikov, commander of the 29th Army, was also killed in fighting over the weekend. The BBC cannot independently verify the claims.

Russian commanders have been increasingly forced to the front in an attempt to drive forward the invasion and Moscow has confirmed the deaths of four senior generals.

Kyiv claims to have killed 12 generals and Western intelligence officials say at least seven senior commanders have been killed.

But there has been confusion over reports of the deaths of several other Russian officers. Three generals that Ukrainian forces claimed to have killed have subsequently been reported to be alive.

In March, Ukrainian forces said Maj Gen Vitaly Gerasimov had been killed outside the country's second city of Kharkiv. However, on 23 May Russian state media said he had been awarded a state honour and dismissed reports of his death.

Another commander, Maj Gen Magomed Tushaev, also appeared to be still alive and periodically appears in videos posted to social media.

And on 18 March, Kyiv alleged that Lt Gen Andrey Mordvichev had been killed in an airstrike in the Kherson region. However, he later appeared in a video meeting with Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov and on 30 May BBC Russia confirmed that he was still alive.

The deaths of generals are rarely officially acknowledged in Russia. In the case of Maj Gen Vladimir Frolov, no information about his death had appeared in state media prior to his funeral in St Petersburg in April.

Russia lists military deaths as state secrets even in times of peace and has not updated its official casualty figures in Ukraine since 25 March, when it said that 1,351 Russian soldiers had been killed since President Vladimir Putin launched his invasion of Ukraine on 24 February.

In March, an official within President Volodymyr Zelensky's inner circle told the Wall Street journal that a team of Ukrainian military intelligence officers had been tasked with locating and targeting Russia's officer class.

"They look for high profile generals, pilots, artillery commanders," the official said. They added that the officers were then targeted either with sniper fire or artillery.

Last month, the New York Times reported that the US has provided intelligence to Ukraine, allowing them to target a number of the generals who have been killed in action.

 

  • Hook 'Em 1
  • Fuck Around and Find Out 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...