Jump to content
Ghost of LL

Time to Peace Out (Relocate Overseas)?

Recommended Posts

22 minutes ago, Onboard 2.0 said:

You might. I won't.....

I meant it as the royal "we" for the whole U.S.  All the damn distilleries switched over to making sanitizer for the beta cucks!  

No, I was actually thinking of something far worse, better left for the CR.  But yeah, statistically speaking---a huge flaw in a plan to live outside the country for a few months is that other country just draws bad cards and you're stuck there for longer than you had planned/budgeted/or may even be legally allowed to stay.  

But the good news for 'Murica, is that the list of nations fairing markedly better than we are in a per capita basis is now in the triple digits...many of which have a very low cost of living and/or favorable to us exchange rate with the dollar.  So we've plenty of options.  Mathematically speaking, we could find a place to go for a few months that would likely not have a flare-up/lock-down scenario.  But again, weather aside---I don't want to be in our nation for 11 weeks from Election Day to Inauguration Day.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Lobo said:

We're going to run out of alcohol.  

Jelly tubs ain’t the only life-lesson in prison.   Crank that pruno...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lobo said:

Yeah, that is my reluctance about going to Costa Rica.  They’re handling the pandemic much better than we are, who isn’t?   But one flare up down there and we are stuck in a national lockdown with little recourse and it could take months to get back home.  It’s much easier to get home from Canada but they don’t really want us right now.  
 

Part of the reason we are still strongly considering it is because something else really ugly is going to happen in this country between November and February and we don’t want to be here when it happens.  

Actually Costa Rica is on the exact same upward spike we are. They shut down when we did. They started reopening pretty much exactly when Texas did. Back in late March and April they were seeing 10-30 cases a day. This last week? 250-350. Also, CR will let you out if you want they just aren’t letting people in.  I know people that left every month since this all started including one couple who just left 2 weeks ago. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lobo said:

I meant it as the royal "we" for the whole U.S.  All the damn distilleries switched over to making sanitizer for the beta cucks!  

No, I was actually thinking of something far worse, better left for the CR.  But yeah, statistically speaking---a huge flaw in a plan to live outside the country for a few months is that other country just draws bad cards and you're stuck there for longer than you had planned/budgeted/or may even be legally allowed to stay.  

But the good news for 'Murica, is that the list of nations fairing markedly better than we are in a per capita basis is now in the triple digits...many of which have a very low cost of living and/or favorable to us exchange rate with the dollar.  So we've plenty of options.  Mathematically speaking, we could find a place to go for a few months that would likely not have a flare-up/lock-down scenario.  But again, weather aside---I don't want to be in our nation for 11 weeks from Election Day to Inauguration Day.  

I know, and I still won't run out.  I can always make a run up to the mountains, and get some very good shine if I need to.  That shit is way better than any hand sanitizer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Lobo said:

We're going to run out of alcohol.  

 

1 hour ago, Onboard 2.0 said:

You might. I won't.....

Reminds me of the movie I watched this week.

AggravatingMindlessAfricanfisheagle-size

@Onboard 2.0 Do you have extra kerosene?

Edited by DDD Dad

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, ChiTownDoc said:

Sister in Law lives in Geneva.  Switzerland is pretty badass.  Starts to feel small but quick flight to some other amazing places.  

Oh and it’s expensive af.  

Lovely place, but (and no offense to your SIL) unfortunately it's full of Swiss people. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Cheeseweasel said:

Onboard:

discovery channel lol GIF

If that's a nice fat joint, yeah.  Checking the proof with bubbles.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Txzen said:

Lovely place, but (and no offense to your SIL) unfortunately it's full of Swiss people. 

All good - she's Slovak.  

And agree on the people...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am an "old," (Graduated UT in 1981), so I and the SO are seriously looking at the island of Roatan in 3 years.

Can get dual citizenship pretty easily.

Get a pretty nice shack right on the beach.

Cost of living not bad.

What's not to like?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am an "old," (Graduated UT in 1981), so I and the SO are seriously looking at the island of Roatan in 3 years.
Can get dual citizenship pretty easily.
Get a pretty nice shack right on the beach.
Cost of living not bad.
What's not to like?
Living on an island would drive me batty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Chewbacca said:
7 hours ago, Lidig8r said:
I am an "old," (Graduated UT in 1981), so I and the SO are seriously looking at the island of Roatan in 3 years.
Can get dual citizenship pretty easily.
Get a pretty nice shack right on the beach.
Cost of living not bad.
What's not to like?

Living on an island would drive me batty.

I'm a very young 62 years old. Have appeared in federal courts throughout the US. Fought many battles in the mental health field. Had a daughter who died. Lived in Dallas most of my life. Don't need so much of what I thought was important.

Snorkeling. Occasionally tending bar in an ex-pat bar. Writing. Fishing. Running on the beach.

My idea of heaven on earth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Lidig8r said:

I'm a very young 62 years old. Have appeared in federal courts throughout the US. Fought many battles in the mental health field. Had a daughter who died. Lived in Dallas most of my life. Don't need so much of what I thought was important.

Snorkeling. Occasionally tending bar in an ex-pat bar. Writing. Fishing. Running on the beach.

My idea of heaven on earth

I loved Roatan.  Lots of services, markets, etc. and beautiful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Interesting thread. 

I have to be honest, I've been back in the US now for almost 6 years and I really think I'm getting close to pushing off. I love so much about America.....the food, sports, the weather, the comforts, the National Parks, the street rod scene, the great cities, little luxuries like having a DRYER, seeing my parents every day, etc. etc.

The big problem I have with America is simply the people. I'm actually getting to the point where I'm just getting burned out on Americans. The entitlement, the constant unsolicited opinions, the victimhood, the complete lack of self-awareness. I could go on and on. There are lots of good people in the States....but the selfishness here drives me bananas. 

People here are so about themselves. It's the Land Of The Me. You can't tell anybody here what to do regardless if it's for the common good.  I spent 18 years mostly in Asia with people that realize a simple thing like wearing a mask is the best thing for the common good of the society. It's 'we', not 'me'. These fuggin American assholes are more worried about ridiculous conspiracy theories and 'liberal media' outlets. GTFO. If you don't want to wear a motorcycle helmet or a seatbelt, cool. I honestly don't care at all if you die in a motorcycle wreck. Free country. But when you refuse to take measures to protect others? That's where I have a problem. You just knew the Americans were going to completely screw up this Covid deal. 

Did you ever have that friend in your 20's that was just constant drama and at a certain point you just had to cut that person out of your life? Man, that's where I'm at with this country. I've never lived anywhere with this amount of constant drama. It's honestly no wonder so many people here suffer from depression and anxiety. The culture is completely nuts. 

Edited by Sweetnsourpoke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Lidig8r said:

I am an "old," (Graduated UT in 1981), so I and the SO are seriously looking at the island of Roatan in 3 years.

Can get dual citizenship pretty easily.

Get a pretty nice shack right on the beach.

Cost of living not bad.

What's not to like?

no Amazon Prime

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Interesting thread. 
I have to be honest, I've been back in the US now for almost 6 years and I really think I'm getting close to pushing off. I love so much about America.....the food, sports, the weather, the comforts, the National Parks, the street rod scene, the great cities, little luxuries like having a DRYER, seeing my parents every day, etc. etc.
The big problem I have with America is simply the people. I'm actually getting to the point where I'm just getting burned out on Americans. The entitlement, the constant unsolicited opinions, the victimhood, the complete lack of self-awareness. I could go on and on. There are lots of good people in the States....but the selfishness here drives me bananas. 
People here are so about themselves. It's the Land Of The Me. You can't tell anybody here what to do regardless if it's for the common good.  I spent 18 years mostly in Asia with people that realize a simple thing like wearing a mask is the best thing for the common good of the society. It's 'we', not 'me'. These fuggin American assholes are more worried about ridiculous conspiracy theories and 'liberal media' outlets. GTFO. If you don't want to wear a motorcycle helmet or a seatbelt, cool. I honestly don't care at all if you die in a motorcycle wreck. Free country. But when you refuse to take measures to protect others? That's where I have a problem. You just knew the Americans were going to completely screw up this Covid deal. 
Did you ever have that friend in your 20's that was just constant drama and at a certain point you just had to cut that person out of your life? Man, that's where I'm at with this country. I've never lived anywhere with this amount of constant drama. It's honestly no wonder so many people here suffer from depression and anxiety. The culture is completely nuts. 
I agree with a lot of your post. Where did you live beforehand?

Enviado desde mi SM-G973U mediante Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/8/2020 at 9:58 AM, Telegraph_it said:

Well duh. Their numbers say so. 

North Korea has the best numbers anywhere, with China and Russia doing very well too on a per capita basis.

If you go the North Korean route then you won’t be forced to eat birds every Tuesday, so you would have that going for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

It's interesting reading all these reactions to living in the US. I disagree with some and agree with others. 

tl/dr: Be better, be kinder, find what makes you happy, do it, don't drink alcohol (for me).

For my end three major things I've done in my own life have made my life immeasurably better. Despite my near death experience and losing my best friend who also happened to be my sister,  in addition my father being diagnosed with Alzheimer's and for a time being sort of homeless in the past 6 years. So, I've been through some shit. 

First, a book I read a long time ago, Seven Habit of Highly Successful People had a chapter dedicated to Sphere of Influence. Now, I'm not talking all of the book, buy this area talked about analysis on items that were in your life (or work place) to determine what you can and can not change. If you can change it, how, make a plan, and do so -execute it NOW. If you can't change it, except it, whether you dislike it or not and move on in life.  It created a few items of focus.

Politics- Our system is broken. My contributions to the lobby groups that support my specific interests are more powerful than the representative I might vote for in an election at the Federal level. I can stand either party, hated both presidental candidates last time, but really, there wasn't shit I could do about it, so I make a continuous choice to let it go, not give a shit. 

People - There are lots of dumb people who do lots of dumb things. I'm aware of it, look to see if I can influence a lobby group with money to support that change. If not, nothing to be done, I laugh and move on. Sure, I'll bitch some here or whereever, but largely I really don't give a fuck. 

Next I moved out of he city. I spent my adult life in Austin and Chicago and my youth in the hood of Dallas. I've see the limited good and tons of stupid in politics on both sides of that coin. I got engaged where I could to help, with a program that helped at youth in at risk neighborhood understand the path to a future in technology and mentored them in that effort. I volunteered for no kill animal shelters doing behavior training and when not doing that cleaned up cages because no other volunteers want to do that task.

So I gave an effort and still work in shelters and contribute financially to those efforts. 

While I travel to cities often for work, I end up back at home in my cabin in the woods. I work on my land, ride my motorcycles, meet with new friends, make new ones and keep in touch with old ones. I complete in shooting competitions, work out, ride my bicycle, travel to great places, eat great food and sometimes just breathe, appreciate what I have, and find happiness in all I have.

Finally, I focus on my beliefs. I won't go deep into those but I also use time to meditate on my beliefs. In short they lead me to "Try and be kinder, be just a little better every day, listen to the universe, be grateful and take time to stop and smell the roses.".

I'm writing all this not to say I'm better than anyone. I'm not. Maybe a tad smarter than some and dumber than others here. I'm writing it all in a very sincere hope that those reading it will find something that helps them in some way. This is an attempt to help others, and be better. Perhaps it's a waste of time or I will be mocked. I'm okay with both as it took nothing away from me to try. That's the point isn't it? Try to be better? I'm trying and that's all I can do.

Edit- I would be remiss if I didn't add not drinking alcohol to my personal list of things to do. I have to. This is no judgement on others only an admission that it doesn't work for me.

Edited by BurntEyes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, BurntEyes said:

It's interesting reading all these reactions to living in the US. I disagree with some and agree with others. 

tl/dr: Be better, be kinder, find what makes you happy, do it, don't drink alcohol (for me).

For my end three major things I've done in my own life have made my life immeasurably better. Despite my near death experience and losing my best friend who also happened to be my sister,  in addition my father being diagnosed with Alzheimer's and for a time being sort of homeless in the past 6 years. So, I've been through some shit. 

First, a book I read a long time ago, Seven Habit of Highly Successful People had a chapter dedicated to Sphere of Influence. Now, I'm not talking all of the book, buy this area talked about analysis on items that were in your life (or work place) to determine what you can and can not change. If you can change it, how, make a plan, and do so -execute it NOW. If you can't change it, except it, whether you dislike it or not and move on in life.  It created a few items of focus.

Politics- Our system is broken. My contributions to the lobby groups that support my specific interests are more powerful than the representative I might vote for in an election at the Federal level. I can stand either party, hated both presidental candidates last time, but really, there wasn't shit I could do about it, so I make a continuous choice to let it go, not give a shit. 

People - There are lots of dumb people who do lots of dumb things. I'm aware of it, look to see if I can influence a lobby group with money to support that change. If not, nothing to be done, I laugh and move on. Sure, I'll bitch some here or whereever, but largely I really don't give a fuck. 

Next I moved out of he city. I spent my adult life in Austin and Chicago and my youth in the hood of Dallas. I've see the limited good and tons of stupid in politics on both sides of that coin. I got engaged where I could to help, with a program that helped at youth in at risk neighborhood understand the path to a future in technology and mentored them in that effort. I volunteered for no kill animal shelters doing behavior training and when not doing that cleaned up cages because no other volunteers want to do that task.

So I gave an effort and still work in shelters and contribute financially to those efforts. 

While I travel to cities often for work, I end up back at home in my cabin in the woods. I work on my land, ride my motorcycles, meet with new friends, make new ones and keep in touch with old ones. I complete in shooting competitions, work out, ride my bicycle, travel to great places, eat great food and sometimes just breathe, appreciate what I have, and find happiness in all I have.

Finally, I focus on my beliefs. I won't go deep into those but I also use time to meditate on my beliefs. In short they lead me to "Try and be kinder, be just a little better every day, listen to the universe, be grateful and take time to stop and smell the roses.".

I'm writing all this not to say I'm better than anyone. I'm not. Maybe a tad smarter than some and dumber than others here. I'm writing it all in a very sincere hope that those reading it will find something that helps them in some way. This is an attempt to help others, and be better. Perhaps it's a waste of time or I will be mocked. I'm okay with both as it took nothing away from me to try. That's the point isn't it? Try to be better? I'm trying and that's all I can do.

Edit- I would be remiss if I didn't add not drinking alcohol to my personal list of things to do. I have to. This is no judgement on others only an admission that it doesn't work for me.

You can be my friend any day and twice on Sundays.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BurntEyes said:

 

tl/dr: Be better, be kinder

Ha. Stones and glass houses and all that. 
 

As for OP, is there really any doubt that he’s not moving out of the country? I don’t know anything about him, but that’s a kind of move that very, very few people are bold enough to actually pull off. More power to him if he does but it seems unlikely. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Lidig8r said:

I am an "old," (Graduated UT in 1981), so I and the SO are seriously looking at the island of Roatan in 3 years.

Can get dual citizenship pretty easily.

Get a pretty nice shack right on the beach.

Cost of living not bad.

What's not to like?

Looks like a half hour to Sweetwater for Walmart and an hour to Abilene's HEB.

And the Yello Whammers is about the coolest 6-man football names ever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Lidig8r said:

I am an "old," (Graduated UT in 1981), so I and the SO are seriously looking at the island of Roatan in 3 years.

Can get dual citizenship pretty easily.

Get a pretty nice shack right on the beach.

Cost of living not bad.

What's not to like?

 

I spent 2+ weeks in Roatan ~20 years ago for an extended dive trip. We did 30+ dives and never went to the same spot twice. It was gorgeous. No idea what it is like these days, but back then I can certainly understand wanting to live there for a while. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
I spent 2+ weeks in Roatan ~20 years ago for an extended dive trip. We did 30+ dives and never went to the same spot twice. It was gorgeous. No idea what it is like these days, but back then I can certainly understand wanting to live there for a while. 

My childhood was typical. Summers in Rangoon, luge lessons. In the spring we'd make meat helmets. When I was insolent I was placed in a burlap bag and beaten with reeds- pretty standard really. At the age of twelve I received my first scribe. At the age of fourteen a Zoroastrian named Vilma ritualistically shaved my testicles. There really is nothing like a shorn scrotum... it's breathtaking- I highly suggest you try it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Where'd u finally land, bro?  

More options, some may be better than others (Turkey?):

https://www.forbes.com/sites/laurabegleybloom/2020/07/28/escape-america-countries-buy-citizenship-second-passport/#539f56557f74

Want To Escape From America? 12 Countries Where You Can Buy Citizenship (And A Second Passport)

Spoiler

After the 2016 presidential election, so many people were dreaming about moving out of the US that Canada’s immigration website crashed. Now, the idea of becoming an expat is getting hot again. According to a recent YouGov survey, 31% of Americans say they are interested in bolting if their candidate isn’t elected in the upcoming November elections. Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson recently made headlines when they became honorary Greek citizens and received second passports. And with the coronavirus pandemic restricting travel for US citizens and the power of the US passport on the decline, it’s no surprise that many Americans are investigating how they can buy a second passport, whether it’s to seek shelter in another country or just to be able to travel more freely.

READ MORE: “Want To Live And Work In Paradise? 7 Countries Inviting Americans To Move Abroad”

Some countries like Barbados and Estonia are luring remote workers with the promise of extended residency programs, which allow you to live and work there for a specified amount of time. But when it comes to obtaining an actual passport, it’s typically more complicated than you’d expect. It can often take up to five years of living in a place to become a resident. (If Hanks and Wilson had taken the normal route to Greek citizenship, they would have had to invest several hundred thousand dollars in real estate and live in the country for seven years.) Many countries also require you to renounce your US citizenship.

But from Portugal to New Zealand, there are countries around the world that welcome Americans—for a price—with citizen by investment programs that grant residency and a second passport. And thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, a handful of Caribbean islands are making it even easier (and cheaper) than ever to obtain a second passport.

“Demand for these programs is accelerating, just as the supply has grown globally,” says Dr. Juerg Steffen, CEO of Henley & Partners, a company that helps people obtain citizenship in other countries. “Increasingly, nations and wealthy individuals see investment migration as more than a competitive advantage. Today, it is viewed as an absolute requirement in a volatile world.”

 

If the idea of moving abroad is truly calling your name, here are some of the best places where you can buy citizenship and a few of the top-line details about what it will take to secure that coveted second passport.

Places to Get Caribbean Citizenship

St. Kitts citizenship second passport

The island of St. Kitts, where you can buy citizenship.

 GETTY

St. Kitts & Nevis

This pair of lush islands has one of the strongest passports in the Caribbean, allowing visa-free travel to more than 100 countries, including Italy and the United Kingdom. Now St. Kitts & Nevis is offering a 23% discount on citizenship through the end of 2020. With a $150,000 contribution to the country’s “Sustainable Growth Fund” and a minimum real estate investment of $200,000, a family of four can obtain passports. The contribution is usually $195,000.

READ MORE: “35 Best And Worst Countries To Raise A Family (You Won’t Believe America’s Ranking)”

Piton View - Saint Lucia

A view of the Pitons on St. Lucia, where you can buy citizenship and a second passport.

 GETTY

St. Lucia

The island of St. Lucia started offering residency to foreigners in 2015, and according to Nestor Alfred, CEO of the St. Lucia Citizenship by Investment Program, about 700 people have obtained passports since then. In May, the price to obtain citizenship was cut in half thanks to new “Covid-19 Relief” bonds: Through the end of 2020, it’ll cost $250,000 for an individual and $300,000 for a family of four. With a St. Lucia passport, you can get visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to 146 global destinations.

St John's, Antigua second passport citizenship

Colorful houses along the waterfront in St John's, Antigua.

 GETTY

Antigua and Barbuda

Another twin-island nation, Antigua and Barbuda welcomes foreigners who want to live the Caribbean dream and is making it less expensive to get a passport here. A $100,000 donation to the country’s development fund, plus a real estate investment, will secure passports for a family of four, and the government recently made it cheaper to add more children. A passport here will get you visa-free access to 151 destinations.

READ MORE: “COVID Report: The Best And Worst Airlines During Coronavirus”

Dominica citizenship second passport

The village of Scotts Head on Dominica.

 GETTY

Dominica

The tiny Caribbean island of Dominica also welcomes foreigners to its beautiful shores and is considered to be one of the best countries for citizenship by investment, since citizenship is extended to your spouse, dependent children and dependent parents or grandparents and can also be passed on to future generations. Applicants need to either make a contribution to the Economic Diversification Fund or invest in luxury and sustainable hotels and resorts.

St. George's Harbor, Grenada citizenship second passport

St. George's, the capital of Grenada.

 GETTY

Grenada

With a passport from Grenada, you can get visa-free access to many countries, including China. There are two different ways to obtain citizenship, including a $150,000 contribution to the country's National Transformation Fund via the Grenadian Citizenship-by-Investment Program or by buying approved real estate with a minimum value of $350,000

Places to Get Citizenship in Europe

Lisbon, Portugal citizenship portugal

It's possible to become a citizen of Portugal.

 GETTY

Portugal

Portugal has become a hot spot for people looking to quit their jobs and move abroad. In order to get a Portugal passport, you need to participate in the Golden Visa program, which has several ways to qualify, including making a donation to Portuguese art and culture, investing in a business, starting a business or by buying real estate. Fun fact: To become a citizen, you’ll need to take a Portuguese history test.

READ MORE: “Foreigners Reveal: 17 Weird Things Americans Do (That We Think Are Normal)”

Skyline, Valletta, Malta second passport citizenship

The skyline of Valletta, Malta.

 GETTY

Malta

Malta’s Individual Investor Program is one of the most popular citizenship schemes. To get Maltese citizenship it’ll cost you approximately $1.1 million through a combination of donations and real estate holdings. In return, you have the right to live and work in Malta or throughout the EU. You’ll also get visa-free access to 183 place around the world.

Girne, North Cyprus second passport citizenship

Girne on the island of Cyprus island.

 GETTY

Cyprus

The Cyprus Investment Program doesn’t come cheap: You’ll need to spend about $2.5 million between donations and real estate investments, but in exchange you’ll be able to travel visa-free to 174 destinations worldwide.

Austria, vienna citizenship second passport

You could live here: Vienna.

 GETTY

Austria

Austria has one of the world’s strongest passports, giving its holders visa-free access to 187 destinations worldwide, plus the right to live in all EU member countries. But it’s not cheap: You’ll need to make a minimum investment of about $3.5 million.

Places to get Citizenship Around the World

Roy's Peak hike, New Zealand citizenship second passport

On a hike to Roy's Peak in Wanaka, New Zealand.

 GETTY

New Zealand

If it was good enough for the Lord of the Rings, it’s good enough for you. New Zealand has made headlines with wealthy expats like Paypal co-founder Peter Thiel buying their way to citizenship. But it doesn’t come cheap. There are two different ways to get citizenship in New Zealand by investment, starting with an investment of at least $2 million over a four-year period.

Cappadocia turkey citizenship second passport

Hot air balloons at sunrise in Cappadocia, Turkey—your possible new home.

 GETTY

Turkey

With a real estate investment of $250,000, you can buy your way into Turkey’s Citizenship-by-Investment Program, which secures a Turkish passport that will give you citizenship in this gorgeous country plus visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to 111 destinations around the globe.

Champagne Beach, Espiritu Santo Vanuatu

On Champagne Beach in Vanuatu.

 GETTY

Vanuatu

Who wouldn’t want to live in the South Pacific? The archipelago of Vanuatu—about 1,000 miles east of Australia—has a Development Support Program that requires a non-refundable donation to the islands of $180,000 for a family of four. In return, you’ll get a passport that will secure visa-free travel to 116 countries, plus the opportunity to call this island paradise your new home.

 

Edited by clapclapclap

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So we are currently looking at Turkey or Ireland. I like Turkey, but Ireland would be a lot easier.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Turkey’s always on the brink of going full right wing Islamic state. No thanks.

Ireland has ginger pussy with a drinking problem. That is worth investigating.

Some friends are moving to Portugal in a month. His parents are from there so it’s an easy move. Plus he retired at 38 a couple of years ago so there’s no need to get a job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Ghost of LL said:

So we are currently looking at Turkey or Ireland. I like Turkey, but Ireland would be a lot easier.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Ireland, and it's not even close. I'd relocate there in a heart beat.  Friendly people, beautiful, clean country, courteous drivers.  The pubs are the best I've ever set foot in.  The only issue is getting good bourbon without emptying a bank account.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Onboard 2.0 said:

Ireland, and it's not even close. I'd relocate there in a heart beat.  Friendly people, beautiful, clean country, courteous drivers.  The pubs are the best I've ever set foot in.  The only issue is getting good bourbon without emptying a bank account.

If it wasn't so cold and rainy all the time, my wife and I probably wouldn't have come back from our honeymoon. We've had serious talks about doing it, we have jobs that would allow us to do it seamlessly. We just can't ever get past thinking that we'd get sick of rain and weather that ranges from freezing ass cold to 70 degrees for about a month in the summer. We like the outdoors and swimming/sunshine too much.

Edited by BradInATX

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Onboard 2.0 said:

Ireland, and it's not even close. I'd relocate there in a heart beat.  Friendly people, beautiful, clean country, courteous drivers.  The pubs are the best I've ever set foot in.  The only issue is getting good bourbon without emptying a bank account.

Ya like dags?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/11/2020 at 4:42 PM, Lidig8r said:

I am an "old," (Graduated UT in 1981), so I and the SO are seriously looking at the island of Roatan in 3 years.

Can get dual citizenship pretty easily.

Get a pretty nice shack right on the beach.

Cost of living not bad.

What's not to like?

I hated hurricanes while living in Houston metro.  There's no fucking way it's better on a fucking island in the Caribbean.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, BradInATX said:

If it wasn't so cold and rainy all the time, my wife and I probably wouldn't have come back from our honeymoon. We've had serious talks about doing it, we have jobs that would allow us to do it seamlessly. We just can't ever get past thinking that we'd get sick of rain and weather that ranges from freezing ass cold to 70 degrees for about a month in the summer. We like the outdoors and swimming/sunshine too much.

When were you there ?  We hit it for 9 days in mid September 2016, and did the southern lap from Dublin down thru Cork, and then up to Galway/ Shannon.

You get sun rain, wind, hot, and cold all in about the span of 20 minutes. The only place I saw weather change that fast was Jackson Hole in April.  Something about being in the middle of the Atlantic at those latitudes, and the light creates a green like no other green I've ever seen, it's electric.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, BradInATX said:

If it wasn't so cold and rainy all the time, my wife and I probably wouldn't have come back from our honeymoon. We've had serious talks about doing it, we have jobs that would allow us to do it seamlessly. We just can't ever get past thinking that we'd get sick of rain and weather that ranges from freezing ass cold to 70 degrees for about a month in the summer. We like the outdoors and swimming/sunshine too much.

Are you me, but older? I have a hard time here in the PNW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Onboard 2.0 said:

When were you there ?  We hit it for 9 days in mid September 2016, and did the southern lap from Dublin down thru Cork, and then up to Galway/ Shannon.

You get sun rain, wind, hot, and cold all in about the span of 20 minutes. The only place I saw weather change that fast was Jackson Hole in April.  Something about being in the middle of the Atlantic at those latitudes, and the light creates a green like no other green I've ever seen, it's electric.

May 2015.

Same thing. I played Old Head one morning and was warm (felt like 70ish) and sunny, perfect golf weather. Played Ballybunion the next day and it was 40 and poured rain. The back 9 was, and I'm not even exaggerating, like the scene from Caddyshack. We experienced the same thing weather-wise. And the colors. It's almost spiritual. Maybe it is. That place is special.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Turkey’s always on the brink of going full right wing Islamic state. No thanks.

 

Particularly these days. Sucks, because it's a gorgeous country with an embarrassment of cultural/historical riches, great food, and good weather. Without the Erdogan (sp?) Government it'd be a great choice. @Ghost of LL have you considered Greece instead? Similar, but not essentially a dictatorship.

 

Ireland is solid, though for longer term I'd want somewhere with better food and weather.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, BradInATX said:

May 2015.

Same thing. I played Old Head one morning and was warm (felt like 70ish) and sunny, perfect golf weather. Played Ballybunion the next day and it was 40 and poured rain. The back 9 was, and I'm not even exaggerating, like the scene from Caddyshack. We experienced the same thing weather-wise. And the colors. It's almost spiritual. Maybe it is. That place is special.

The Ring of Kerry was especially beautufl. We did the tour, and didn't realize our hotel (an old manor houses') house back yard was the edge of the ring of Kerry.  Cigars, and whiskey were really nice those nights on the lawn.

Edited by Onboard 2.0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Turkish cuisine is the most underrated in the world.  It's like the Greatest Hits compilation of all the best Mediterranean stuff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
 
 

 
Particularly these days. Sucks, because it's a gorgeous country with an embarrassment of cultural/historical riches, great food, and good weather. Without the Erdogan (sp?) Government it'd be a great choice. @Ghost of LL have you considered Greece instead? Similar, but not essentially a dictatorship.
 
Ireland is solid, though for longer term I'd want somewhere with better food and weather.
 

So I’m looking for 3 months, which is short enough that I don’t really care about the government, but I definitely care about the food and weather.

The time zone, however, makes Ireland attractive as I am going to continue to do work remotely and the kids will be in remote school.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/12/2020 at 4:05 PM, Sbbruin said:

I loved Roatan.  Lots of services, markets, etc. and beautiful.

Roatan is easily one of the most beautiful beaches I have ever been to. Was there with Ivan in 2005. lol. 

Must be a fuckton more expensive now then back then. Would live there in a heartbeat if not for the obvious drug cartels, gangs and shit. I did some of Honduras and man its rough. The capital is rough AF, and San Pedro Sula is really rough. Spent the night in Tela and was one of the craziest places I have been to. Met some dudes from Manugua who refused to get off the bus in Tegucigalpa lol. 

Anyway, I am sure its better now than it was 15 years ago 

giphy.gif

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 52-80 said:

Turkish cuisine is the most underrated in the world.  It's like the Greatest Hits compilation of all the best Mediterranean stuff

I would put Hungarian food as a very, very close second to Turkish food for being vastly underrated.

German Schnitzel specifically is also vastly underrated. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would put Hungarian food as a very, very close second to Turkish food for being vastly underrated.
German Schnitzel specifically is also vastly underrated. 
Isn't most schnitzel Austrian?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Chewbacca said:
1 hour ago, BurntEyes said:
I would put Hungarian food as a very, very close second to Turkish food for being vastly underrated.
German Schnitzel specifically is also vastly underrated. 

Isn't most schnitzel Austrian?

Schnitzel is generic cutlet.  Wiener Schnitzel is specifically Viennese using veal.  But both idea are stolen from the italian Milanese which predates them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Chewbacca said:
1 hour ago, BurntEyes said:
I would put Hungarian food as a very, very close second to Turkish food for being vastly underrated.
German Schnitzel specifically is also vastly underrated. 

Isn't most schnitzel Austrian?

tumblr_ol6tamJzUZ1qmob6ro2_500.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
×
×
  • Create New...