Jump to content

Astros 2020-21 offseason- can't be any worse than last year, right? RIGHT?


Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, henrygandorf said:

is forrest whitley still alive?

He feels so bust-y. He's now 23 and has thrown a total of 85 minor league innings over the past 3 seasons (and wasn't particularly good in them). 

Maybe he'll figure it out. Maybe he's traded for Benintendi. Maybe go fuck myself. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Scraps said:

After last year i would pay Correa whatever the fuck he wants for 12 years i don't give a fuck. He is the heart of the team and I am down with him 4 life. I don't even care if he leaves next season and goes to the Yankees I would still root for him.

He is a badass and told the haters and the media to suck it. Exactly the attitude we need. They wanted the Astros to wallow and cry and give mea culpas all years. We are a damn good team and he backed it up. Hate Us

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Scraps said:

After last year i would pay Correa whatever the fuck he wants for 12 years i don't give a fuck. He is the heart of the team and I am down with him 4 life. I don't even care if he leaves next season and goes to the Yankees I would still root for him.

Instead, the Astros go to arbitration over a measly $3 million in his final year before free agency.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Needed the spot on the 40 for Brantley, they also DFA'd Humberto Castellanos to make room for Castro yesterday.

No relation that I have found to former big league catcher, Damon.

But given the 30+ ages of Castro and Maldanado, is good to get some catchers in the system. Going to be a big developmental year for both Berryhill and the kid from Cal they took 2 years ago.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, UTexasFight said:

While I hated knowing we were going to lose George, had come to accept/understand/move on from it.... until Justice had to go and write this

dammit

https://www.texasmonthly.com/the-culture/houston-astros-george-springer-toronto/?utm_source=Texas+Monthly&utm_campaign=0c54e62789-TM+This+Week+1-23-21&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_92f99d7313-0c54e62789-53579063

Truly the heartbeat of the team.
I think he’s arguably about the 6th or 7th best/talented player from the team that was so good in 2019, but when he was right he could carry us and we were unbeatable. Loved him. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, n64ra said:

I fear Springer was the one to lock up.

I don’t think so. I don’t think he ages particularly well and from a $/production standpoint I think the Astros played it perfectly. But, I wanted him to retire an Astro. 

  • Hook 'Em 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This Aaron story mentions his relationship with a young Dusty Baker:

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/01/what-hank-aaron-told-me/617809/

 

Spoiler

What Hank Aaron Told Me

When I spoke with my boyhood hero 25 years after his famous home run, I learned why he’d kept going through the death threats and the hate.

10:59 AM ET
Author of Me and Hank

One morning in Milwaukee in 1972, I read in the sports pages that my hero, Henry Aaron, was getting hate mail and death threats simply for following his dream. Hank, the superstar outfielder for the Atlanta Braves, was approaching what was then considered the greatest record in sports: the career home-run record of 714, held by the legendary Babe Ruth. During his chase of the Babe, Hank received 929,000 letters—at an ounce a piece, 29 tons of mail. Some of it cheered Hank on, but much of it was filled with racist hate and violent threats.

One of the letters was from me. Hank’s Milwaukee Braves had abandoned us for Atlanta six years earlier. But I’d stayed a fan, managing to tune into Braves’ games through the static on WSM, the Nashville station of the Grand Ole Opry. “Don’t listen to those racists,” I urged Hank. “We’re rooting for you up here in Milwaukee.”

To my astonishment, a few weeks later, Hank wrote back. “Dear Sandy,” the letter began.

I want you to know how very much I appreciate the concern and best wishes of people like yourself. If you will excuse my sentimentality, your letter of support and encouragement means much more to me than I can adequately express in words.

It is very heart warming to know that you are in my corner. I will always be grateful for the interest you have shown in me. As the so called “count down” begins, please be assured I will try to live up to the expectations of my friends.

Wishing for you only the best, I am

Most Sincerely,

Hank Aaron

The letter was signed in blue ink.

I started a scrapbook, chronicling “Henry’s Homers” as he chased the Babe’s ghost. I knew what his letter had meant to a white teenager growing up in Milwaukee, but I didn’t fully understand what Hank himself faced at the time. Years later, as a journalist working on a book about Hank, I had the chance to talk to his daughter, his teammates, and Hank himself. And I learned that in that long-ago summer, he wasn’t just battling pitchers and worrying about curveballs—he was putting his own life on the line in the fight against racism.

Hank, who grew up under Jim Crow in Alabama, received letters threatening to murder him unless he gave up his chase for the home-run record. One writer promised to shoot Hank at home plate, either with a long-range rifle, from the bleachers, or with a handgun, from the box seats. The threats were so specific, Braves officials alerted the FBI. When a credible threat surfaced of a kidnapping plot against his daughter, Gaile, then in college, five FBI agents showed up at her dormitory at Fisk University in Nashville. They flashed their badges. Gaile recounted the conversation: “‘The men you see cutting the grass, those are FBI men. The men painting in the student union, those are FBI men.’ And the only thing I could say is, ‘Does my father know you’re here?’”

Gaile’s father stayed at hotels separate from the rest of the team, eating alone in his room. When a specific death threat surfaced, team officials would ask him whether he’d like to skip the game. He never did. Occasionally, though, he’d alert his teammates Ralph Garr and Dusty Baker, young Black men Hank had taken under his wing, who sat next to him in the dugout.

One night in Atlanta, Hank “told Ralph and I that we better not sit next to him, because there was a death threat,” Baker, now the manager of the Houston Astros, told me in 1999. “Some guy in a red coat with a high-powered rifle was gonna shoot Hank. So Hank told us, if we didn‘t want to sit next to him, he understood. And Ralph and I were like, ‘No, Hank, we’re down with you, man; if you go, we go.’ But the whole game, Ralph and I were looking around for some guy in a red coat. And Hank wasn’t even paying attention!” Baker laughed hard. “And if a firecracker would have gone off, me and Ralph would have sworn we were shot.”

Tom House, a Braves relief pitcher, who caught Hank’s 715th homer in the Atlanta bullpen, told me that his teammate had an uncanny ability to compartmentalize, blocking out the hate while he focused on fastballs. Tellingly, though, much of white America, including many of Hank’s teammates, had little or no idea what he was going through, despite the occasional media report. Phil Niekro, the knuckleballing Hall of Fame pitcher, told me that Hank never shared his trauma, and that team officials must have kept it quiet as well.

But Black America was fully aware of the heroism of Hank’s struggle. An Atlanta barber told me he worried that Hank would lose his life before he broke the record—a fear shared by Hank’s mother. When Hank hit his record 715th blast, on April 8, 1974, off a fastball from Al Downing of the Dodgers, fireworks erupted from the Braves scoreboard.

Vin Scully, the Dodgers’ legendary broadcaster, captured the moment: “A Black man is getting a standing ovation in the Deep South for breaking the record of an all-time baseball idol. And it is a great record for all of us, and particularly for Henry Aaron.”

As Hank crossed the plate and held the ball aloft, his mother rushed out to greet him. “She had something else on her mind,” Gaile remembered as we paged through my yellowing scrapbook in the lobby of her Atlanta condo in 1999. As the fireworks continued, Gaile recalled, “she thinks someone is shooting at Daddy. And she said that ‘if they’re going to take him, we’re going to go together.’ She was going to go down with him.”

Gaile’s reaction when her father achieved one of the greatest accomplishments in the history of sport was the same as his: “Thank God it is over.”

The trauma took its toll on Hank, even if he didn’t let on at the time. “My kids had to be sheltered,” Hank told me. The ordeal, he said, “carved a part of me out that I will never regain, never restore.” The mounting death threats, the hate, and the resulting isolation of his family ate away at him.

What kept him going, Hank told me, was the sense that he was taking part in a larger struggle for equality—even if he hadn’t ever planned to. “That was a time when Martin Luther King was saying to everybody, ‘If you haven’t found something you’re willing to die for, you probably aren’t fit to live,’” Andrew Young, the former Atlanta mayor and top aide to King, told me. “And I think Hank had decided that his life was vulnerable, and that if it meant dying in the course of doing his best, I don’t think he actually worried about it.”

John Lewis, the late civil-rights hero, added that Hank had “that extra ounce of grace” that allowed him to excel under extreme hardship. “I felt I was in the middle of something,” Hank told me.

To a lifelong fan like me, and to so many others, Henry Louis Aaron was much more than a record-setting baseball star. He was a quiet leader who unflinchingly risked his life in the name of racial justice.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Gourmand said:

Astros signed another Cuban bat......

 

Lefty bat....played most games at 1B.  Decent amount in LF also.  Hopefully can become Yuli's replacement since our 1B in the minors blow ass 

Edited by Scraps
Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Scraps said:

Lefty bat....played most games at 1B.  Decent amount in LF also.  Hopefully can become Yuli's replacement since our 1B in the minors blow ass 

26 years old, so hopefully it doesn't take him long to get to the bigs

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, WBT said:

26 years old, so hopefully it doesn't take him long to get to the bigs

Yeah I would guess it wouldn't....Stros have the option on Yuli so they can either replace him after 2021 or wait another season if this dude needs to have more ABs. That is assuming they are even wanting him for 1B and not OF.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, David Dennison said:

We won't know until we see how he's doing on the back end of that contract. 

 

20 hours ago, Wulaw Horn said:

I don’t think so. I don’t think he ages particularly well and from a $/production standpoint I think the Astros played it perfectly. But, I wanted him to retire an Astro. 

That's why I said fear instead of know for sure or guarantee. Glad you are more optimistic than me.

Edited by n64ra
Link to post
Share on other sites

With the nets and other areas off limits(next to bullpen) before covid. Really hate to see what else they take away. Either way itll be nice just to go watch a game again.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites

Give Correa 3-85 and McCullers 3-50. Add in the arb numbers for this year and make them 4 year deals. City of Houston needs good news today.

That would coincide with Altuve and Bregman's contracts, Correa would be 29 and McCullers 30.

Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, HtownHorn said:

Give Correa 3-85 and McCullers 3-50. Add in the arb numbers for this year and make them 4 year deals. City of Houston needs good news today.

That would coincide with Altuve and Bregman's contracts, Correa would be 29 and McCullers 30.

Why in the world would Carlos Correa agree to that?

Link to post
Share on other sites

enough already.  go ahead and break the fucking bank with correa.  he's an mvp talent at a need position, and he's shown he wants to be an astro for life.  he's entering his year 26 season, so he's still getting better.  give him 6+ years, it's worth it.

sure, it would be great if everyone stayed for cheap and nobody cheated and we beat the nats and blah blah blah but this ain't that.

sign him and go win some fucking baseball games, i'm sick of this shit.

  • Hook 'Em 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, henrygandorf said:

enough already.  go ahead and break the fucking bank with correa.  he's an mvp talent at a need position, and he's shown he wants to be an astro for life.  he's entering his year 26 season, so he's still getting better.  give him 6+ years, it's worth it.

sure, it would be great if everyone stayed for cheap and nobody cheated and we beat the nats and blah blah blah but this ain't that.

sign him and go win some fucking baseball games, i'm sick of this shit.

I see I have a subscriber to my 12 year 350 million plan. 

  • Fuck Around and Find Out 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My hope with Correa is based on how saturated the SS market is going to be next off-season. Correa, Lindor, Story, Baez, Seager are all set to hit free agency at once. Maybe the abundance of SS options depresses the market a bit, and maybe that makes him more likely to listen on a potential extension with the Astros. 

Then again, maybe the Mets extend Lindor like LA did with Betts last year, and maybe the Dodgers extend Seager too, and that saturated SS market never really materializes.

 

  • Hook 'Em 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...