Jump to content
Reese Bennett

Texas Recruiting Notes 2021

Recommended Posts

3 minutes ago, hornfromdallas said:

once he commits we wont have to worry about him flipping to oregon that bridge has been burned 

1277313588235927552127731358823592755212773135882359275521277313588235927552

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/9/2020 at 11:04 AM, Burt Macklin said:

I’ve talked about it before, but his arm motion is basically perfect. Quick release with power and no wasted motion every time. On top of that, he has an incredible arm. The only thing he really needs to work on is avoiding over-striding before the throw and keeping his plant foot closed and towards the target. He opens it up way too much, which makes it so he can’t fully drive off his back foot, because doing so would drive his body away from the throw. When you watch his back foot drive in his throws, you can see a lot of inconsistency. Sometimes he’s not even pushing off his back foot until the ball’s almost out. RoJo also struggled with syncing up his weight transfer to power his throws in HS. 
 

This forces him to generate all his power from upper body torque and arm Movement. He has a good enough arm to get away with that, but the thing that suffers when you do that is accuracy and consistency in motion, which is evidenced by him completing only 56% and 61.8% of his passes the last two years, which is low for a top 100 QB prospect. 
 

Im not very concerned about it, because he’s shown improvement over the last year, and it’s something that can be fixed at the next level, especially since he should be getting a redshirt year. He actually shows some of the best form I’ve seen from him in this video, which is good to see, but if you look at the very last throw at :53, you can see the problem. Once he starts moving and muscle memory kicks in, he takes too big of a stride with his plant foot and his foot is way to the left of where he’s throwing. He needs to dial in his stride and direction of his plant foot so he can get full drive off his back foot every throw and then his accuracy will improve.  
 

Hudson Card’s actually a great example of the right mechanics. If you watch his videos, his feet are always shoulder width apart in his stance and he plants and drives in one fluid motion with almost identical strides very time. He’s also got the timing of his movements down perfectly so his back foot push powers his throwing motion every time and he releases the ball extremely quick. 

That is a low fucking bar. lol.

I do think Milroe’s a great prospect and he’s absolutely got the athleticism to fix his footwork and become more accurate. You’d way rather have a guy who needs or improve his footwork than Re-do his entire throwing motion. 

Forgive me, but is this by design?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Rogers is keeping his plant foot closed and it's clearly something Milroe is working on, as noted in the previous videos and in the example from Stanfield that @Burt Macklin and I discussed a bit. A lot of QBs play middle infield in baseball and you can often see them open too early and too far with the plant foot. -- note the first few throws in the Milroe video again. If you look at his plant foot it is out or away from the target. you see this a lot with max effort fastball pitchers as they get tired and then they begin to miss up and in because their plant foot is dumping out.

Look at Milroe on those examples - the left foot is out and actually pointing away from the intended target, so his arm and shoulder will have to do much more work delivering this throw. Note the plant foot for Rodgers - in front of the body, in balance, and creating a perfect pivot point - toe -> - hip -> torso rotation. 

 

 

Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-2-56-31-PM.png

to quote myself from before  ::

You can tell that in the early part of the video that he is working on rotating with his upper body. Note that he is focused on lead shoulder and rotation to throwing shoulder - looking out over his finish arm and holding an exaggerated finish. The issue is that during this work, his base (his feet) are way too wide during these reps. It makes it much harder to rotate, his hips, and forces the arm and shoulder to do more work because the legs aren't carrying their share. You want them to be just over shoulder width -- which he does and you can see in the later throws where he gets into "football" mode as opposed to "learning" mode. 

Note the front foot in the later "football" mode throws :: 

Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3-02-22-PM.png

 

Edited by golfclap

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, golfclap said:

 

 

Pretty sure he will commit to Texas on the 3rd, but will have to be recruited through the whistle. Even if Oregon is out, Colorado and ASU are both after him heavy. Hell of a haul for Ash and Valai at DB especially if we can land Mukuba

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, RGBIII said:

Pretty sure he will commit to Texas on the 3rd, but will have to be recruited through the whistle. Even if Oregon is out, Colorado and ASU are both after him heavy. Hell of a haul for Ash and Valai at DB especially if we can land Mukuba

can Ash and Valai start recruting OL?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, golfclap said:

Rogers is keeping his plant foot closed and it's clearly something Milroe is working on, as noted in the previous videos and in the example from Stanfield that @Burt Macklin and I discussed a bit. A lot of QBs play middle infield in baseball and you can often see them open too early and too far with the plant foot. -- note the first few throws in the Milroe video again. If you look at his plant foot it is out or away from the target. you see this a lot with max effort fastball pitchers as they get tired and then they begin to miss up and in because their plant foot is dumping out.

Look at Milroe on those examples - the left foot is out and actually pointing away from the intended target, so his arm and shoulder will have to do much more work delivering this throw. Note the plant foot for Rodgers - in front of the body, in balance, and creating a perfect pivot point - toe -> - hip -> torso rotation. 

 

 

Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-2-56-31-PM.png

to quote myself from before  ::

You can tell that in the early part of the video that he is working on rotating with his upper body. Note that he is focused on lead shoulder and rotation to throwing shoulder - looking out over his finish arm and holding an exaggerated finish. The issue is that during this work, his base (his feet) are way too wide during these reps. It makes it much harder to rotate, his hips, and forces the arm and shoulder to do more work because the legs aren't carrying their share. You want them to be just over shoulder width -- which he does and you can see in the later throws where he gets into "football" mode as opposed to "learning" mode. 

Note the front foot in the later "football" mode throws :: 

Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3-02-22-PM.png

 

Boss. We need a film school thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Ricky's one-hitter said:

Forgive me, but is this by design?

 

 

 

3 minutes ago, golfclap said:

Rogers is keeping his plant foot closed and it's clearly something Milroe is working on, as noted in the previous videos and in the example from Stanfield that @Burt Macklin and I discussed a bit. A lot of QBs play middle infield in baseball and you can often see them open too early and too far with the plant foot. -- note the first few throws in the Milroe video again. If you look at his plant foot it is out or away from the target. you see this a lot with max effort fastball pitchers as they get tired and then they begin to miss up and in because their plant foot is dumping out.

Look at Milroe on those examples - the left foot is out and actually pointing away from the intended target, so his arm and shoulder will have to do much more work delivering this throw. Note the plant foot for Rodgers - in front of the body, in balance, and creating a perfect pivot point - toe -> - hip -> torso rotation. 

 

 

Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-2-56-31-PM.png

to quote myself from before  ::

You can tell that in the early part of the video that he is working on rotating with his upper body. Note that he is focused on lead shoulder and rotation to throwing shoulder - looking out over his finish arm and holding an exaggerated finish. The issue is that during this work, his base (his feet) are way too wide during these reps. It makes it much harder to rotate, his hips, and forces the arm and shoulder to do more work because the legs aren't carrying their share. You want them to be just over shoulder width -- which he does and you can see in the later throws where he gets into "football" mode as opposed to "learning" mode. 

Note the front foot in the later "football" mode throws :: 

Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-3-02-22-PM.png

 

Yeah, I think the original guy tweeting is talking about creating rotational torque as opposed to focusing on direct forward momentum.  The popping off the front foot is because you’re creating torque with your body as opposed to taking a large plant step, which is flat footed, and then trying to get all your power from pushing your whole body forward, which is definitely a slower process that will lead to a slower release. Clearly Milroe is being taught by Stanfield to emulate this motion, which will lead to the front foot being a tad bit more open, but there are still mechanical flaws with Milroe’s throwing. 
 

I agree with golfclap on Milroe’s  front foot, because you can’t create torque if your plant foot and front shoulder are already open, and the problems I see with his throws are when he uses all arm, because he’s not utilizing the rest of his body on the throw, be it through forward momentum or torque. Milroe also overstrides fairly often, which doesn’t allow him to create as much torque on his throws. 
 

 Stanfield’s video has a couple clips of Hudson Card, and his reps are a better example of what it should look like than what we’ve seen from Milroe. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, RGBIII said:

Pretty sure he will commit to Texas on the 3rd, but will have to be recruited through the whistle. Even if Oregon is out, Colorado and ASU are both after him heavy. Hell of a haul for Ash and Valai at DB especially if we can land Mukuba

Agreed, especially as a kid who has never set foot on campus.  Bud Elliot has done a lot of good work noting the totally abnormal amount of commitments that have happened to this point compared to other years. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Getafix said:

 

image.thumb.png.2be960e30fda293779e0bf8691058297.png

 

Tim Watkins - Baylor Insider - on Lemear.

 

  Hide contents

 

image.thumb.png.c44010ffe66ce50c99dccb0be953b307.png

 


 

They think they're really in it with Gilbert? Hmmmmm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Elmer_Fudd said:

10.52 100m

 

10 minutes ago, HenryJames said:

Is that good?

 

46vp25.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, texifornia said:

Funky timing. We taking more CBs? Pressure play on Johnson?

Was looking through the Jamier Johnson evals in the absence of verified times and the Biggins one said he may end up a safety. I rewatched some of his huddle, and damn if that's not a decent bet. We could be taking Johnson as a flex db, "luxury take" type and still be looking for 1 and 1. Johnson is certainly more suited for B12 safety than Lemear is. Also, with impending decommit szn, I think you take as many guys as you can and then figure it out in the wash. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jalon looks more athletic and much better at sticking with his man in coverage, although he does look pretty small. Johnson has better size but not much hudl of him in coverage

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
Quote

In addition to the schools mentioned -- Indiana, Arizona State, SMU, Tulane and Louisiana -- Texas and Texas A&M are two other schools steadily monitoring the three-star edge-rusher. Texas defensive line coach Oscar Giles speaks weekly with Stansbury and he's a legacy in College Station. His older brother, Gavin Stansbury, played for the Aggies from 2010-2013.

https://n.rivals.com/news/louisiana-edge-rusher-gharin-stansbury-moving-closer-toward-a-decision

https://247sports.com/Player/Gharin-Stansbury-46097905/

His tape is what I want Alexander's tape to look like. Long dude, quick first step, good block shed, decent bend. I haven't watched any opponent film, but my guess is he gets run by on occasion. Pulls up and deflects 3 or 4 balls as well. I like him a lot more than Alexander. 

Edited by Ricky's one-hitter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeff Howe: How Texas has been able to benefit from transition classes

Quote

When conducting a study to see what Texas has gotten out of recruiting classes since the start of Mack Brown’s tenure leading up to the roster continuing to be built by Tom Herman, the first class under the microscope is a transition class in 1998. It's a haul built in part by John Mackovic’s regime through 1997 and was finished off by Brown and Co. when he was hired from North Carolina following Mackovic’s swansong that ended a five-year run. Overall, the class was successful.

While it only produced one NFL draft pick (offensive lineman Mike Williams was the fourth overall pick in 2002), the lone draftee wasn’t the only success story of the class. Marcus Wilkins carved out a long career for himself in the NFL after being a special teams demon for the Longhorns. Ahmad Brooks was a team captain who lost his starting spot, earned it back and became an active-roster NFL player as an undrafted free agent. One-third of the class became eventual starters during their time on the Forty Acres.

The 1998 class was a good transition class because it helped Brown stabilize the roster while he stocked the cupboard with talent in the classes that followed. Every coach has a transition class and the lessons learned from 1998 are worth remembering when looking at how the 2014 and 2017 classes are going to go down in history. The former was comprised of some of Brown’s final verbal commitments and was finished off in a matter of weeks by Charlie Strong. Strong put the wheels in motion, but Herman had to carry the latter group across the finish line following the Thanksgiving weekend coaching transition less than 24 hours after the 2016 season ended. So, what makes a good transition class?

Following the formula based off of studying the 1998 class, there are three distinct areas where a transition class can help the program rather than be a burden. While the 2014 and 2017 hauls might be most remembered for who the Longhorns missed out on due to things falling apart for the previous coach (future first-round picks Jamal Adams and Solomon Thomas were among the 2014 prospects Texas pursued vigorously, as were the likes of J.K. Dobbins, Walker Little in 2017), Strong and Herman both did enough things right that both classes are on track to go down as better than what otherwise might’ve been expected.

Minimize the bust rate

That’s easier said than done since, historically speaking, transition classes have a high bust rate. When tracking the historical data of the Texas classes in question, Horns247 has decided to define a bust as a prospect who transferred out of the program in two years or less, failed to letter and — for all intents and purposes — took up a scholarship that would’ve been better used elsewhere. Out of the 18 members of the 1998 class who went toward the study, only two were considered busts and one of those signees (running back Chris Robertson) had a season where he rushed for 10 touchdowns (1999).

The 2014 class finished their time in the program with a bust rate of 22.7 percent. That's above the ideal mark of a 20 percent or lower rate but falls below the dreaded 30-percent or higher range (which is when a class teeters on being a failure unless the top of the class is extremely talented). Derick Roberson, Duke Catalon, Jermaine Roberts and Cameron Hampton contributed to the transfer attrition within Strong’s first two years on the job while a series of injuries kept Blake Whiteley from seeing the field.

Of the 17 signees Herman got to campus in the 2017 class (four-star Tyler John Tyler wide receiver Damion Miller failed to qualify), 11 remain in the program and three completed theri eligibility for the Longhorns, giving the class a current bust rate of only 17.6 percent. Along with developing a franchise quarterback in Sam Ehlinger, Herman has seen 12 of the 17 qualifying signees earn some level of starting experience through three years.

Guys like Poona Ford, Andrew Beck, Chris Nelson and Elijah Rodriguez became key players for Herman out of the 2014 class while Ehlinger, Ta'Quon Graham, Gary Johnson, Derek Kerstetter, Cade Brewer and Samuel Cosmi are among 2017’s front-line players.

Lean on the relationships from your previous job

Not everyone can do what Brown did, which was come into the state and pull a talented foursome out of Texas City (Jermaine Anderson, Ervis Hill, Tyrone Jones and Everick Rawls), fend off the likes of Miami for Lee Jackson and plant the flag with little regard for the competition. Against that backdrop, the recruiting landscape within the state was vastly different for Strong and had changed even more by the time Herman got the job. Nevertheless, both staffs were able to lean on the relationships they built with prospects at Louisville and Houston, respectively, to bring quality players to Texas.

Strong inherited Beck, Jason Hall, John Bonney, Jake McMillon, Armanti Foreman and D'Onta Foreman, players who helped both his staff and Herman fill out the depth chart. What helped save the class was Vance Bedford and Chris Rumph teaming up to snag Ford and Nelson right before National Signing Day and Joe Wickline identifying Elijah Rodriguez as a player with some upside to him (Texas flipped Rodriguez from Colorado late in the cycle).

Herman did the same with Cosmi, Marqez Bimage and Daniel Young all committed to Houston when the head coach made his way to Austin. Derek Warehime’s Oklahoma connections led the Longhorns to Reese Leitao and both Brewer and Kerstetter turned out to be good evaluations by the staff.

Don’t be in a hurry to recruit over the previous staff’s takes

Where some coaches get themselves in trouble in a transition is when they feel the need to throw out the previous staff’s recruits like food that's gone beyond the expiration date. For Texas, Strong’s roster purge before the 2014 season forced him to use whatever pieces he had available and Herman needed most of the class to play early due to the attrition rate in his first spring and summer with several key members of the 2016 signing class departing the program.

Strong was able to retain the Foreman twins, which led to him being able to boast a consensus All-American running back who gained 2,000 yards in a season and won the Doak Walker Award during his tenure. He also got plenty of snaps out of Bonney, Hall, Beck, McMillon, Jerrod Heard, Lorenzo Joe and Dorian Leonard, all prospects recruited by Brown’s staff.

In addition to Ehlinger and Graham, Herman has seen Strong holdovers Josh Thompson, Kobe Boyce and Montrell Estell start games in their respective careers. Herman’s situation was different from Strong’s because the recruiting philosophy of the previous regime left Herman with a lot of spots to fill (of the 17 enrollees, 12 were recruited by Herman and Co.).

Transition classes don’t have to be throwaway hauls and for the Longhorns, none over the last three coaching changes have been forgettable. Herman’s time in the saddle has seen the program benefit from guys who were originally recruited by Brown or were brought into the fold early in Strong’s tenure (of the 22 qualifying signees in the 2014 class, 15 helped the Longhorns end a run of three losing seasons in a row in 2017 and four were members of the squad that won the Sugar Bowl in 2018).

One of the pieces Herman inherited from Strong’s final cycle on the job, Ehlinger is the most important when it comes to Texas potentially winning a championship in 2020. Rather than being a burden on the program, the last two transition classes for the Longhorns have played a big role in getting things headed in the right direction with a chance existing for a breakthrough in Herman's fourth season.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

McCaskill was thought of as a big frame kind of single cut power back but he turned in a 10.91 in the 100 and went from maybe getting in to Oklahoma State's class to a guy that might be able to pick from just about anywhere. No we have not reached out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, golfclap said:

McCaskill was thought of as a big frame kind of single cut power back but he turned in a 10.91 in the 100 and went from maybe getting in to Oklahoma State's class to a guy that might be able to pick from just about anywhere. No we have not reached out. 

AccurateYawningHatchetfish-max-1mb.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, golfclap said:

McCaskill was thought of as a big frame kind of single cut power back but he turned in a 10.91 in the 100 and went from maybe getting in to Oklahoma State's class to a guy that might be able to pick from just about anywhere. No we have not reached out. 

Is he better than JBrooks? Yes. Is he an RB1? I still think that's up for debate. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Defensive recruiting is so far ahead of offensive recruiting right now.
 

Look at how many coals are in the fire at DL and DB. Those are the positions where we are actually landing many of our top targets and yet we still have many contingencies in place.

Offensively, outside of QB, we’ve either missed or are currently behind on almost every top target, and yet the next offers/contingency plans are somehow coming out slower than on the defensive side of the ball.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ its weird. With current info, i would take our offensive staff over our defensive staff all day long. so why aren't players seeing it the same way?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, Longhorn94 said:

^ its weird. With current info, i would take our offensive staff over our defensive staff all day long. so why aren't players seeing it the same way?

Yeah? Yurcich might be the best hire overall but they look comparable to me.

Edited by Bevo14

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Longhorn94 said:

^ its weird. With current info, i would take our offensive staff over our defensive staff all day long. so why aren't players seeing it the same way?

I think the Brockermeyer sentiment of "wait and see" has been co-opted as a negative recruiting tool with offensive prospects, and it's landing. If the offense shows up and plays equal to or better than last year statistically (volume stats, not situational), there will be plenty of new traction with old names. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Bevo14 said:

Yeah? Yurcich might be the best hire overall but they look comparable to me.

Yurcich + Hand + Boulware is a better trio than any three on D.

Drayton is meh and Coleman TBD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Ricky's one-hitter said:

I think the Brockermeyer sentiment of "wait and see" has been co-opted as a negative recruiting tool with offensive prospects, and it's landing. If the offense shows up and plays equal to or better than last year statistically (volume stats, not situational), there will be plenty of new traction with old names. 

agreed. i think thats fair.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Longhorn94 said:

Yurcich + Hand + Boulware is a better trio than any three on D.

Drayton is meh and Coleman TBD.

Hand is proving to pretty meh right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, HtownHorn said:

Hand is proving to pretty meh right now.

He's done a good job as a coach. Next year shows whether he can take the next step to "great".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, texifornia said:

He's done a good job as a coach. Next year shows whether he can take the next step to "great".

My hope is a more consistent offensive scheme and game plans that attack the opponent's weakness will allow the OL to flourish. Still, needs to pick up the recruiting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, HtownHorn said:

Hand is proving to pretty meh right now.

I disagree. I think Hand has done a good job. I think our offensive system sucked last year. But if you look at the talent, the technique, the cohesiveness, all of it is much better under Hand than any previous OL coaches for the last forever. Cosmi going in 1st round and DK getting drafted will silence the critics. and if Yurcich is as good as I think he is, Hand's coaching will really show well.

For the Brocks, I still dont get it. Blake KNOWS Hand is a good coach and that his boys would develop properly under him, regardless of the offensive system, and that Tommy will be a first round pick under Hand and James will be coached up as much as possible. Hand teaches all the right things and is good at it. Again, Blake knows this. I still dont understand why they wouldnt jump into this class as soon as possible and lead it to the #1 class in the nation. It seems like you could control your own destiny at that point. But to do what they are doing is just puzzling (assuming they go to Texas).

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I don't get with the Brocks is two years ago Blake let his son turn down a full ride from Rice and at least one P5 school (Oregon State I think?) to walk-on at Texas. He must have been cool with Herman to a certain degree to allow that to happen. 

If Blake is really driving this hesitancy what is really the deal? Did the last few years of inconsistency change things? Was he less invested in Luke's football future anyway because he probably doesn't have next level talent? Did more exposure to Herman these last few years just grind down his patience with the guy?

Is Hand the problem? That one seems unlikely to me, I agree he's done well and he's well respected among coaching circles. Maybe it's more simple and the twins never bought into the family fandom at the same level as Luke. This is all probably well covered territory on this thread but fuck it, endless off-season and whatnot.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems like it’s the o-lines performance in the big games like OU and Baylor that give people pause on Hand. They acted as if they’d never seen a stunt in their life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hand has done a good job.  Our offensive game plan sucked. That’s on Tim.  Amazing how good they looked against Utah.  The line was solid and effective.  Where we lost games was the ability to correct the game plan on the fly.  Mike will fix that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, UncleSonny said:

What I don't get with the Brocks is two years ago Blake let his son turn down a full ride from Rice and at least one P5 school (Oregon State I think?) to walk-on at Texas. He must have been cool with Herman to a certain degree to allow that to happen. 

If Blake is really driving this hesitancy what is really the deal? Did the last few years of inconsistency change things? Was he less invested in Luke's football future anyway because he probably doesn't have next level talent? Did more exposure to Herman these last few years just grind down his patience with the guy?

Is Hand the problem? That one seems unlikely to me, I agree he's done well and he's well respected among coaching circles. Maybe it's more simple and the twins never bought into the family fandom at the same level as Luke. This is all probably well covered territory on this thread but fuck it, endless off-season and whatnot.

 

I think it's mostly due to the fact that we took a step back last year, replaced a lot of the staff, and Herman is back on the hot seat. Just doesn't scream stability. The Brocks know that at their other top choice (Bama), they are pretty much guaranteed to be developed properly and go to the playoffs a few times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


mpu


Football ... Basketball ... Baseball ... Other Sports ... Recruiting ... Gambling ... Movies & TV ... Music ... Hobbies ... Lulz ... Food & Travel ... Daily Texan ... Help ... For Sale ... Politics ... Board Discussion
​
Ă—
Ă—
  • Create New...